David Thompson
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November 24, 2015

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Karen M

peak political correctness

Related…

http://heterodoxacademy.org/2015/11/24/the-yale-problem-begins-in-high-school/

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Meanwhile, a student having been microaggressed by the image of a Confederate battle flag on another student's privately owned computer, the Framington State Universuity, Bias Protocol and Response Team, led by plucky People's Commissar Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Sean Huddleston, has had "...a productive reeducation session discussion between the person making the report and the laptop owner about the incident...", the incident. Fortunately, People's Commissar Huddleston "provided a list of the various resources the university provides to help students cope with their trauma" that ensues when they look at other people's computers.

dw

Good discussion, especially the bit about a strong counter-narrative. "Cultural confidence", as you put it.

David

“Cultural confidence”, as you put it.

I liked the acknowledgment that Western culture is by some margin the most self-critical culture on Earth, and that while this can be a benefit, it’s a tendency that has been exploited by the left and used as a kind of cultural immunosuppressant. The effect of which is to inhibit responses to, and discussion of, serious threats.

John D

But political correctness is all about tolerance...!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/12011143/Student-driven-from-campus-after-speaking-out-against-rape-seminar.html

WTP

So Bill Whittle is a Florida Gator. Just thought I'd point that out.

David

On that cultural confidence, or the lack thereof:

Barack Obama, in his first remarks about the slaughter [in Paris], did not mention Islam at all. The attack was, he said, not just an attack on Paris or the people of France but “an attack on all of humanity and the universal values that we share.” The trouble is, it is patent that the “values” to which Barack Obama gestures are anything but “universal.” On the contrary, they are Western, liberal values that are conspicuously not shared by much of the world. They are most flagrantly not shared by Islamic culture. Religious freedom, including the freedom of apostasy, freedom of speech, equality before the law and between the sexes: these are a few bedrock Western values that are neither preached nor practiced by the dominant currents of Islamic thought.

And,

A widely reproduced picture of the man who had dragged his piano, decorated with a peace symbol, to the Bataclan theatre, the primary site of the massacre, and then sang John Lennon’s single most emetic composition, “Imagine,” is not reassuring. As the commentator Mark Steyn acidly put it, “What kind of parochial solipsist would think that an appropriate response a day after mass murder?”

What kind indeed.

Hal

. . They are most flagrantly not shared by Islamic culture. . . . >

Ah, but David, by the way, nor are . . Western, liberal values . . . the least bit shared by Christianity, in various branches.

Oh. Hang on, oh wait, all that bit about two different branches of The Faith are slaughtering each other and whomever they can get their hands on, that was actually back in the 1500s, Common Era, aka 1500 years after the creation of Christianity, wasn't it.

Leesseee . . . Do the Islamic maths . . . Oh, Look: I am extremely amused to note that according to the Islamic calendar, right now actually does seem to be sometime in the 1430s---I tried two different converters, got 1438 in one, 1436 in another . . . Factor in the advances of planet wide near instantaneous communication and resulting discussions, and what do you know; It's about 1500 years after the founding of The Faith, and two different branches of The Faith are slaughtering each other and whomever they can get their hands on, all being exactly the same practice as Christianity. . . .

Sooo. Basically, five hundred years of cultural growth later, quite exactly as the entirely correct and quite Conservative U.S. President Obama has quite correctly stated, in his first remarks about the slaughter [in Paris], did not mention Islam at all. The attack was, he said, not just an attack on Paris or the people of France but “an attack on all of humanity and the universal values that we share.”

---And as far as the pianist, the selection of John Lennon was also quite correct, just not the era . . .

Microbillionaire

The existence of Henry the Fourth, the Protestant King of Catholic France who led a war against the Catholic League, then converted to Catholicism, then was assassinated by a Catholic fanatic, deals a heavy blow to the idea that the Wars of Reformation were essentially about denominations of faith rather than largely opportunistic power struggles with religious pretext.

There was also the case in England of Henry the Eighth first standing up so vehemently for Catholicism against Protestantism that the Pope declared him Defender of the (Catholic) Faith. Not ten years later Henry would make a complete turnabout, tell the Pope where to stick it, and lose his title and get excommunicated from Catholicism for this. But he liked the title, so in a petty snit he got Parliament to declare him Defender of the Faith again for his own Protestant church, the Anglicans.

Finally, I would mention the accounting from the Encyclopedia of Wars, where religious wars comprise ca 7 percent of recorded wars. Of those 7 percent, the majority were Islamic despite Islam's late appearance and limited spread. "The Christians did it too, 500 years ago" is not only a red herring (we're not living 500 years ago), it's false.

Patrick Brown

I've always thought the protestant reformation was about 90% a war of political independence from the Vatican disguised as a theological controversy.

Bill

I would not agree with Hal's suggestion that religions follow a certain trajectory of development that somehow makes them especially dangerous 1500 years after their founding. His implication that in five hundred years time Islam will become as benign as Christianity seems right now is lacking evidence of a mechanism for this coming about. Islam has always had a blood-soaked history, and the resurgence of this in the post-WW2 seems more linked to the availability of finances from oil revenues combined with the suicidal lack of confidence by Western Civilization. A key difference between the religious memes of Christianity and Islam is that in Christianity the Bible is considered inspired by God but still the work of men, whereas in Islam the Qur'an is believed to be the literal word of their God Allah, unchanged and unchangeable. This allows reinterpretation of the Bible over time as philosophy and culture changed, but with an immutable Qur'an you cannot make any changes that affect behaviors proscribed or mandated on the faithful.

Jen

Hitch. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yj0xFpu6Hgw

David

A small sample of the demands made by students during the recent protests on US campuses.

And hence the term Mao-lings.

Hal

A couple of points . . .

His implication that in five hundred years time Islam will become as benign . . . .

Not will as much as noting that Oh. My, isn't the parallel timing interesting . . . And besides, what is indeed noted right now is that there is Daesh, and then there are the rather vehement observations by Muslims that Daesh is not Muslim . . .

Thousands of Muslims victimized by DAESH
Daily Sabah - ‎Nov 18, 2015‎

Local Muslim leaders speak out against radicalization, ISIS
WLS-TV - ‎Nov 18, 2015‎

Paris attack: As a Muslim I'm disgusted how Isis can carry out this violence ...
The Independent - ‎Nov 14, 2015‎

Etc.

A key difference between the religious memes of Christianity and Islam is that in Christianity the Bible is considered inspired by God but still the work of men, whereas in Islam the Qur'an is believed to be the literal word of their God Allah, unchanged and unchangeable.

Except that one notes that memo never went around either, noting the very recurring insistence among rather a number of Christians that in Christianity the Bible is . . .believed to be the literal word of their God . . . , unchanged and unchangeable.

Microbillionaire

https://www.google.com/search?q=hal+is+a+condescending+prat+who+thinks+google+searches+count+as+arguments

I quite like the first hit: Is Google Making Us Stupid?

Hal

google+searches+count+as+arguments

Heh. Arguments? Nah. Supporting evidence . . .

newrouter

> noting the very recurring insistence among rather a number of Christians that in Christianity the Bible is . . .believed to be the literal word of their God . . . , unchanged and unchangeable. <

allan likes to kill the "infidel: and it says this where exactly in the new testament?

OJ

Always felt there was 'something of the night' about this Molyneux character. Just Googled him and found my instinct to be correct...

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