David Thompson
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August 08, 2016

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Alice

Sethi’s five sanctions include “a 50-day suspension beginning Aug. 1, mandatory attendance of the Libra Project diversity workshop, mandatory attendance of three cultural events per month, a reflection letter and a public presentation [on] what the diversity experiences have taught her about “cultural issues,”

Funny how student politics has gone from stupid and boring to creepy and weird.

David

Funny how student politics has gone from stupid and boring to creepy and weird.

I think student politics has long been home to the obnoxiously dogmatic and generally unpleasant, at least since student politics has been largely synonymous with leftist politics. But it is interesting just how rapidly and wholeheartedly the campus left has embraced historical precedents of which it apparently has no knowledge:

I mean, that is the direction they’re headed in, isn’t it?

Ted S., Catskill Mtns., NY, USA

How much funding does the Libra Project get?

Jeff Guinn
Inevitably, the issue of naked, often comical hypocrisy becomes hard to avoid

Just as hard to avoid as when politicians and celebrities with armed security tell the rest of us our guns need confiscating.

Mike

But it is interesting just how rapidly and wholeheartedly the campus left has embraced historical precedents of which it apparently has no knowledge:

I don't think knowing about Maoism would put them off.

David

I don’t think knowing about Maoism would put them off.

Possibly not. The combination of identity politics and theatrical victimhood does tend to attract deeply unpleasant people, many of whom are gripped by a kind of imperviousness. But the proponents of this identitarian farce seem to imagine themselves as original and pioneering. That’s part of the imagined radical glamour. I can’t help thinking we should at the very least strip them of that vanity.

Richard

All of this would end overnight if we simply removed the social sciences and humanities from campuses, something Japan seems to be considering.

Burnsie

Struggle sessions do end the need to, you know, actually persuade people with a superior argument. And they let you settle all kinds of scores rather emphatically.

I have no doubt today's leftist coalition would love to bring them back into vogue. Twitter mob attacks are fine, but they don't let you really smell the fear of the person you are destroying. Know what I mean?

David

Twitter mob attacks are fine, but they don’t let you really smell the fear of the person you are destroying. Know what I mean?

Despite the incoherent protestations of higher purpose, that is, and generally has been, what these dramas are about. The thrill of exerting power over others. Though it’s still a little surreal to see it happening again in some of the most cossetting environments in human history.

ARGH

Almighty Allan, please grant Rohini Sethi the strength to call the Maoists' bluff.

And to make a massively public show of it.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg offers another case study.

Worse than the San Fransisco house is his debacle on Kauai. This bozo bought over a square mile of the 522 sq. mile island and immediately proceeded to put up a six foot lava rock wall around the thing including along Highway 56. The reason for the wall was "to block highway noise" which is utter BS given that 56 only runs about a quarter way around the island, and is all of two lanes. Seeing as how his property is on the windward side, the chances of hearing road noise are about zero.

The locals are rightly pissed off and there are questions about the legality of the wall given Hawaiian laws, not that Zuck couldn't have found friendly politicians. The property also includes a half mile of prime beach. Unfortunately for him, Hawaiian law says all beaches (except on military reservations) are public access up to the high tide line, so I hope the locals take full advantage of this to express their displeasure.

I mean, that is the direction they’re headed in, isn’t it?

Given the example of Ms Sethi I'd say they are already there except for the stylish headgear.

...this anti-government slogan [i.e., the Gadsden flag]...

It is worth noting for those in the UK who may be unfamiliar the Gadsden flag, it was originally a symbol of protest by our persons of pallor against your persons of pallor, so how the hell that is rayciss is more than a stretch.

David

it was originally a symbol of protest by our persons of pallor against your persons of pallor,

[ Pencils note to self: Must reclaim colonies. ]

Jonathan

[ Pencils note to self: Must reclaim colonies. ]

Bertie Wooster: " Why, what happened in 1776?"

Jeeves: " I prefer not to dwell on it sir."

tolkein

The former colonies are always welcome to petition to join the Commonwealth. Indeed, given a choice between Trump or Clinton, our Queen as a Head of State must look more attractive with each passing day.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Indeed, given a choice between Trump or Clinton, our Queen as a Head of State must look more attractive with each passing day.

Only if she outlives Prince Charles, and we're not going to start driving on the wrong side of the road.

Thon Brocket

The former colonies are always welcome to petition to join the Commonwealth.

There is, however, the matter of 240 years' unpaid tea duty.

R. Sherman

...[H]ow the hell that is rayciss is more than a stretch.

Excuse me, Muldoon. Actual historical facts shall not be allowed to conflict with the approved narrative. (See also, the constitutional counting of slaves to determine the number of representatives in Congress, a measure designed to diminish the legislative power of the more populous slave-holding states which wanted to count slaves a "persons" for some persons without giving them rights or abolishing slavery as had already been done in the north.)

R. Sherman

Make that, "count slaves as "persons" for some purposes." Jeeze Louise, where's my coffee?

wtp

I think student politics has long been home to the obnoxiously dogmatic and generally unpleasant

As a youngster, I found the whole concept of student government rather absurd. I recall in 1st grade being selected to sit on stage with older candidates (5th and 6th graders and such) who were giving speeches. I didn't have to say anything myself as I presume it was simply a way of introducing us younger kids to the concept. I do recall looking around at the other kids in my predicament and thinking they weren't the kind of kids I cared to be around. Not that I recall despising them or anything. I don't recall exactly who or why but at some level I felt they weren't my "kind". I remember being very uncomfortable and couldn't wait to get back with the rest of my class. Once it was explained to me what SG was all about, it seemed absurd. Obviously the head honcho was the principal, followed by one's teacher. It all seemed like playing house to me and even as a youngster I loathed being patronized.

 Captain Nemo

The former colonies are always welcome to petition to join the Commonwealth. Indeed, given a choice between Trump or Clinton, our Queen as a Head of State must look more attractive with each passing day.

I don't suppose you've seen this, have you? Saw it a while ago, and it gave me a chuckle.

David

Heh.

Daniel Ream

Once it was explained to me what SG was all about, it seemed absurd. Obviously the head honcho was the principal, followed by one's teacher. It all seemed like playing house to me[...]

I noticed this in high school. What I found particularly egregious were the school-funded trips to the local theme park and similar "team-building exercises" for the student government. When I wrote an article for the school paper expositing that the student government had no actual power to change anything, didn't do anything except hold meetings, and the most onerous work they'd ever had to do was attend the funeral of a student who died while driving drunk, I was threatened with suspension by the principal.

In retrospect, that's probably the most useful thing I learned in high school.

Spiny Norman

Heh.

I think I first saw that "Make America Great Britain Again" at 4Chan, where it was a recurring/endless argument/flame war/thread topic for a few weeks (although it may have originated at Reddit, their arch-rivals).

Spiny Norman

As noted at the College Fix link, the University of Houston has weighed in on the Rohini Sethi matter,

The University of Houston has become aware that the Student Government Association (SGA) has suspended its vice president, Ms. Rohini Sethi, from participating in SGA activities. Actions by SGA, a registered student organization subject to its own governance, are not University actions and do not affect the academic standing of a student at the University of Houston. The University of Houston continues to stand firm in support of free speech and does not discipline students for exercising their Constitutional rights.

For now.

Although she is cooperating with the student government Red Guards for the time being, if Ms Sethi should balk at the extent of her punishments, which will continue into the future, without any doubt, what will the administration do if the SGA decides her contrition is insufficient and they expel her from the student government and (what would surely be their end-game) demand her expulsion from the University? I seriously doubt the administration will accept mass stupidity by "offended" students, and the potentially financially-damaging aftermath such as occurred at the University of Missouri, for the sake of one student.

Hedgehog

Funny how student politics has gone from stupid and boring to creepy and weird.

I think "creepy and weird" rather understates the true nature of the phenomenon. How about "scary, yet drearily predictable"?

shock troops

Students seem to always be the shock troops of the revolution.

Jeff Wood

My dear Nemo, very good, though I would be inclined to use the Anigoni portrait: Lisbeta would win in a canter with that up on the posters.

(Look it up yourselves: the last time I tried to post something fancy here, David had to work on the site for weeks to get it functioning again.)

David

last time I tried to post something fancy here, David had to work on the site for weeks to get it functioning again.

It’s a good job I’m such an easy-going host.

What?

Joan

And finally, in sexual objectification news.

There's a lot of it about. :-)

https://twitter.com/fifthwavefem/status/762625161300316160

Spiny Norman

I can't vouch for the reliability of the source, but in today's politically-correct-to-a-fault atmosphere, this does not seem entirely too absurd to be bogus:

A man who famously stood up to the Munich shooter after he killed nine people is facing being charged by a prosecutor for insulting the killer ...

Florian Weinzierl, spokesman from the Munich State Prosecutor’s office, confirmed the Munich resident is being investigated. He said the post-shooting exchange between Mr Salbey and Sonboly had no influence on their actions. What will be included in the charges remains to be established, as it whether they will be brought forward. But Mr Weinzierl suggested they could include “insults to the detriment of the dead.”

{o.O}

sH2

"Perceptions (feelings) not evidence determine the guilt of a 'hate' crime..."

https://twitter.com/exsacerdotal/status/762556290984009728

David

Adam Carolla chats with Ben Shapiro.

jabrwok

Anigoni portrait: Lisbeta

This one?

Somehow when I look at that, I hear the Imperial March from Star Wars.

I'll stick with "Make Texas A Country Again" I think.

Theophrastus

"The combination of identity politics and theatrical victimhood does tend to attract deeply unpleasant people,..."

I think that combination not only attracts the deeply unpleasant but also creates them -- by offering otherwise largely harmless inadequates the intoxicating prospect of being the centre of attention and of having victim status.

R. Sherman

@Jabrwok

I think he means this one.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Meanwhile at the U of Queensland, U of Louisville (KY), and UCLA, some left on left action as signs suggesting people take stairs instead of elevators are fat shaming and abelist.

Jeff Wood

I do indeed, RS.

RY

It's a good job I'm such an easy-going host.

:-)


Ping.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Somehow when I look at that, I hear the Imperial March from Star Wars.

I can see that, but it does have a Vigo the Carpathian feel as well.


jabrwok

@R.Sherman, that one's much nicer, and less "All Will Love Me, And DESPAIR"-ish than the one I found:-).

Hal

It’s a good job I’m such an easy-going host.

Reminds me of an observation of mine from awhile back.

I am indeed familiar with The Cult Of The Dog.

Bark, bark. Dog this, dog, that. What dog should I get. What dog do You have? Of Course everyone has a dog. Et Bloody Barking Cetera.

I prefer cats.

Any Questions?

pst314

"A man who famously stood up to the Munich shooter after he killed nine people is facing being charged by a prosecutor for insulting the killer..."
Here's a German link, for those who are not sure if they should trust the Sun and the Express:
http://www.welt.de/vermischtes/article157477536/Anwohner-nach-Balkon-Wutrede-angezeigt.html

Darleen

Well, with all the precious snowflakes on campus, you just knew that this was coming ...

GREENVILLE, N.C. --
East Carolina University is starting an "adulting" counseling program to help students deal with failure and other pitfalls of growing up.

The school was prompted to begin the program after noticing an increase in counseling appointments - 9,000 appointments were requested last school year, an increase of 1,800 appointments in just two years, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Virginia Hardy said.

SumDumGuy

think he means this one.

If you have one of her pouting or biting her lip I'll give her all of my votes.

R. Sherman

@SDG,

Beware Rule 34.

Vince N

A man who famously stood up to the Munich shooter after he killed nine people is facing being charged by a prosecutor for insulting the killer ...

Germany is still a totalitarian state.

David

I think that combination not only attracts the deeply unpleasant but also creates them -- by offering otherwise largely harmless inadequates the intoxicating prospect of being the centre of attention and of having victim status.

Well, identitarian politics and “social justice” in general offer endless opportunities to scold and feel superior, and to wallow in self-absorption and petty grievance, so it will attract and retain people who find that kind of thing appealing. It then gives those people a license and pretext to indulge those inclinations, and cultivate them, all with in-group reinforcement and a sham piety. And when someone feels a need to signal their piety, their personal virtue, so often and ostentatiously, it’s not unreasonable to wonder who they’re trying to convince, and why.

Being steeped in “social justice” boilerplate seems to entail a rejection of stoicism and self-possession (and even the idea of such things) in favour of unrealism, dogmatism, resentment and vindictiveness. It also seems to encourage habitual chippiness, a captiousness, whereby one asserts one’s status by finding fault in the most humdrum things, and then inflating that fault, or imagined fault, to sociological proportions. Everything, it seems, is oppressive or “problematic,” from tiny cakes to spell-check software.

[ Edited. ]

J.M. Heinrichs

This one:
http://imgur.com/PRcD6vi

Cheers

[+]

"The secret life of a trade union employee: I do little but the benefits are incredible".

http://www.samizdata.net/2016/08/they-like-to-fill-out-forms/

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Everything, it seems, is oppressive or “problematic,” from tiny cakes to spell-check software.

Nicknames, don't forget nicknames.

PETA’s letter asking him to become a vegan said: “Like many others, we’ve been enthusiastically following your career, and we thought we’d send you a gift of delicious vegan steaks and burgers in the hope that you’ll consider adopting a kinder, healthier vegan lifestyle, which would pave the way for a new nickname: Andrew ‘Tofu’ Johnston.”

It would be funny, if they weren't so damn serious about it.

David

This just in. Wearing camouflage pants is, apparently, “anti-feminist.” And by wearing them you’ll risk traumatising brown people, who are oppressed enough anyway, while practically endorsing “human hunting” and “gunning down and killing other human beings.”

Tim Newman

This just in. Wearing camouflage pants is, apparently, “anti-feminist.” And by wearing them you’ll risk traumatising brown people, who are oppressed enough anyway, while practically endorsing “human hunting” and “gunning down and killing other human beings.”

Slightly related, but one of the amusing things I read when I first mobilised to Nigeria was that wearing camouflage gear of any sort is a very bad idea in Nigeria (or anywhere else in Africa). Whereas in the West wearing camouflage pants generally means you work in IT or are Swampy's best pal, in Africa it means you're in some sort of militia which might also be an illegal one.

The pathetic comment about traumatising brown people aside, coming face to face with an illiterate African soldier wearing a "uniform" with missing buttons, a beret that's been used to clear up an oil leak, fingerless leather gloves, aviator shades, and carrying an Ak-47 from the Biafran War is a genuinely scary experience. Especially so if he's the clever one in charge.

R. Sherman

This just in.

I note the author is "Annah Anti-Palindrome" previously discussed on these pages.

David

previously discussed on these pages.

She was indeed.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Wearing camouflage pants is, apparently, “anti-feminist.”

"Three powerful stories." Powerful but inaccurate to the point of being complete fiction, and what is it with these morons that everything is "powerful".

1. She reminded me that US border guards are often armed white folks dressed in full military fatigues...

Actually, the guys in the picture are a "militia" with no authority to do anything anywhere except their own property. The actual Border Patrol that would have been encountered is 52% Hispanic and looks like this:

Large lack of camouflage in those Texaco Man suits.

2. Needless to say, these troops weren’t there to provide aid. They were sent to establish military order and authority over a newly displaced community – the majority made up of low-income black folks...“[T]hese troops [in New Orleans] are armed as they would be in Iraq, with automatic rifles, guns strapped to legs, and pockets overflowing with ammo.”

Total and utter horseshit, this one just pisses me off. Those sufficiently interested can read about the whole thing here, (highly recommended) but the bottom line is that only one of the six Task Forces (TF DEFENDER) subordinate to Task Force PELICAN, the over all C2, was comprised primarily of MP units, and at that they functioned as much as a humanitarin aid distribution unit as MPs. The other TFs were aviation, (flying 6.500 missions tht rescued 9.600 people, transported, 35,000 locals, and delivered 2,100 tons of cargo in 11 days), engineer (responsible for restoring infrastructure), logistic (both internal to the TFs and external to the citizens). The only real patrolling was done in Orleans parish (New Orleans city, basically) out of 13 supported parishes, by a subordinate TF of TF Santa Fe, and that was only done because the locals couldn't behave themselves.

"Pockets overflowing with ammo..." what utter overwrought horseshit, one does not carry ammo in pockets, and certainly not to the point of overflowing. It is amazing that these jerks can't even see how stupidly nonsensical their comments are.

3. At that time, it was difficult to distinguish photos of police in Ferguson from images coming out of war zones like Iraq and Afghanistan. Armored vehicles driven by officers (dressed in full camouflage battle uniforms) patrolled the streets at all hours.

Yeah, no. The only cops dressed in camouflage were SWAT, and the only reason they were there was because the locals were burning their own town down and looting.

The humor value of these idiots is starting to wear off, but I guess I shouldn't expect anyting rational from our old friend Annah Anti-Palindrome.

R. Sherman

Total and utter horseshit, this one just pisses me off.

The problem is not that the horseshit appears in Everyday Feminism; its that it appears in the mainstream media on a regular basis. You and I can chuckle about "pocket overflowing with ammo," but the NYT and others do their best to confuse semiautomatic and automatic weapons almost daily. The MSM knows most of its readers are too lazy or insulated to seek out the truth.

David

Another Ben Shapiro talk, at the University of Rochester.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

R.Sherman,

For reasons that are not important now, I got direct info on the Katrina mess daily from people on the ground and this knee-jerk disparaging of troops who were doing a hard job in lousy conditions for frequently ungrateful people, I probably take too personally.

You are, however, of course correct, but the disinformation is like a cholera outbreak with no way to secure the Broad Street pump handle.

R. Sherman

Farnsworth,

Katrina is something that disturbs me greatly, as well. It was used solely as a means of attacking a) Bush The Younger and b) deflected attention from the Democratic mayor and governor of LA who had truly fucked the first response up beyond recognition. Virtually everything negative which as reported was fabricated to one degree or another. (Remember the cannibals running amok in the Superdome) First disaster response is a state and local issue, not a federal one by statute, but only the feds took any blame while Ray Nagin and Mary Landrieu escaped scrutiny.

Spiny Norman

R.Sherman,

Plus all the millions in federal money provided over the years to raise and maintain the levees that was siphoned off to nothing but corrupt officials slush funds.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

First disaster response is a state and local issue, not a federal one by statute...

Indeed, but active component planners not being idiots, they knew AC units would be deployed, orders were going out to AC units before landfall, and the only reason there was any delay was because Blanco's refused to allow JTF-Katrina (DoD) to take over evacuation and command of the National Guard units in Louisiana.

Pubes McStinkly

...the constitutional counting of slaves to determine the number of representatives in Congress, a measure designed to diminish the legislative power of the more populous slave-holding states which wanted to count slaves as "persons" for some purposes without giving them rights or abolishing slavery as had already been done in the north.

There was a similar trick pulled in Australia with regard to Aborigines.

The colonies with the highest Aboriginal population were also the ones that didn't permit Aborigines to vote. Upon Federation, the constitution held that (1) a state's representation in federal parliament would be directly proportional to that state's population, and (2) "population" was to be defined as only those people who were permitted to vote.

Thus, the newly-minted states of Queensland and Western Australia had to choose between maximising their representation at the federal level or a full extension of the franchise. They eventually caved in 1962 (Western Australia) and 1965 (Queensland).

But if you ask an educated Australian when and how Aborigines got the vote, they'll tell you it was thanks to a referendum in 1967 - and they'll probably repeat the canard that prior to this referendum Aborigines were "officially classed as flora and fauna".

I've heard that line often enough, and in those exact words too, that I assume it must come from some official or respected source, despite it being total bollocks. (I'd say obvious bollocks, except that I didn't twig that anything was wrong when my history teacher said it.)

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