David Thompson
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May 29, 2017

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MC

stolen by white supremacists

I must say, if I was a white supremacist, I'd have stolen this video for my website.

David

Note the demand that all faculty and staff undergo “anti-racist” “competence training.” Moments later, one of the ‘protestors’ asks, “Are there any black folks who need water in here?”

MC

Watching the video, all I can think of is toddlers having a tantrum: the screaming, the dancing, the shaking hysteria, the sense that they are absolutely loving it...

BTW well done to Prof. Weinstein for standing up to this bull(ying)shit.

David

Around 4:40:

“I’m tellin’ you, you’re speakin’ to your ancestor, all right? We been here before you. We built these cities, we had civilization way before you ever had … comin’ out your caves.”

Yes, the smug black student is the “ancestor” of the older people she’s lecturing. She, personally, is the original upright human. “We’re not simpletons,” says she.

David

the screaming, the dancing, the shaking hysteria, the sense that they are absolutely loving it...

If you wanted a mental image of the world’s most pathological kindergarten, the video above would be a pretty good template. And if the ‘protestors’ – who alternate between ostentatious weeping and mob thuggery - actually wanted to inspire racist feeling, and make onlookers despair at the state of the supposed black intelligentsia at Evergreen, this video – of their own words and behaviour - would be a very good way to go about it. And yes, at times you can actually hear the titillation, the sense of trying it on, with each attempt to go a bit further and be a little more gratuitously offensive, a little more racist. Like a child testing parental boundaries.

Because no-one is pushing back.

Tom
“We’re not simpletons,” says she.

Having to tell someone that you are not a simpleton probably means you are. <Fredo Voice>"I'm smart!</Fredo Voice> ...and we all know how well it turned out for him...

I have to admit that I haven't watched this video, although if it's what I think it is then I have seen it via Twitter, along with lots of other videos here are the same petulant children screaming over, and over, and over again.

My first thought is, when is anyone at any of these institutions going to stand up to them and act like an adult? I'm losing any sympathy I may have had because university administrators and lecturers have made this rod for their own back, and I can't say I'm not enjoying watching it being used.

I know, the Discipline Room is that way...

John D

the video... was stolen by white supremacists and edited to expose and ridicule the students

They're doing that all on their own.

David

They’re doing that all on their own.

Yes, but the attempt to displace blame for how they seem is, like so much else, revealing.

Burnsie

It resembles Phnom Penh in 1975.

Astute. Although there's more race-fueled malice this time around. These children have been conditioned to hate whites.

Another difference: we Americans are armed to the teeth. These ragebots can act out all they want on college grounds, but they'll be in for a rude awakening if they ever take it past the safe-space tantrum stage.

WTP

The Google reviews of TESC as they call it, T for The I presume, are interesting. Especially those from months/years before the recent exposure. One liberal arts student from four months ago gives it two stars and says

I hate to say anything bad about TESC because it offers so much potential for change and progression but overall I probably wouldn't recommend attending this college.

Here is the short of it: Generally academically weak faculty (I didn't take any science classes so this only stands for the Arts) who show a general disinterest in their students. An administration that has no formal method for dealing with complaints or the lack of academic merit of most Arts programs. Uncomfortable and unheated classrooms: the chairs force you to lean forward or to lean back, there are no chairs with strong back support (this, to me, is absurd at a institution of learning!).

Because this is an interdisciplinary school there are very few subjects that you can take programs for throughout your entire time here and thus you can't really focus in a subject. This of course doesn't apply for Science but for the Arts.

Want the good!? Tons of great, ambitious and self-motivated students that deserve a lot better faculty and administration. The administration and the college at large seem to put the students last. But what's the best part about the college and why is the college even here? Because of the students. Before Evergreen changes the world, they need to change themselves first - same old lesson from Gandhi - "be the change you want to see in the world".

Plenty of comments from 5-7 years ago describing a hippie world and weak academics outside of math/science. One points out that the math/science classes can be triggering because such faculty are oblivious to the mindset of those kinds of students. Notable alumni include Matt Groenig.

WTP

Oh, and their mascot is the geoduck, descibed as a "penis clam" by some also of Mike Rowe fame.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoduck
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0849908/

WTP

Another difference: we Americans are armed to the teeth.

And yet these little tyrants go to school on your money anyway. They just get the state to do the dirty work. And we all comply.

David

Oh, and their mascot is the geoduck, described as a “penis clam”

I’ve nothing to add, I just thought it bore repeating.

Trevor

We built these cities, we had civilization way before you ever had … comin’ out your caves.”

We wuz kangz! Presumably this was at a time when the laws of physics were different and it was possible to chant, dance and gibber stuff into existence.

And this little gem at about 3:03: "Is there any Black folks that need water in here?" How inclusive.

sH2

the video created for Day of Absence and Day of Presence that was stolen by white supremacists

Wait. They thought any of this would make them look good...?

JuliaM

OK, how much does President Bridges and his senior staff get a year? Because no amount of money would keep me in a job where I was ridiculed by the ungrateful little bastards, not even a couple of million.

Mass expulsions, George. Are you a man, or a mouse? Squeak up!

Mags

How's that affirmative action working out?

David

A lot of this, I think, is due to the fact that many people, especially in academia, are reluctant to challenge racism and racial bullying when black people indulge in it. As if those indulging in it, provided they have brown skin, should be held to a much lower standard, if any standard at all. Some will tie themselves in moral knots pretending it didn’t happen, even when it’s happening right in front of them. As we’ve seen, quite vividly,

WTP

OK, how much does President Bridges and his senior staff get a year? Because no amount of money would keep me in a job where I was ridiculed by the ungrateful little bastards, not even a couple of million.

Mass expulsions, George. Are you a man, or a mouse? Squeak up!
....
A lot of this, I think, is due to the fact that many people, especially in academia, are reluctant to challenge racism and racial bullying when black people indulge in it.

Y'all are assuming they have someplace else to go. They're academics. Their options are mostly limited to academia. A CV looks very different from a resume, having reviwed a few. And once you are associated with a story like this that one can easily run across on the internet doing the most basic DD, you are as radioactive as your students. It's Stockholm Syndrome on steroids at this point.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

We built these cities, we had civilization way before you ever had … comin’ out your caves.

I see. So there existed magnificent African cities and civilization (for which there is no archeological evidence), but all were wiped out by knuckle dragging honkey cave men. OK, I am guessing that idea wasn't completely thought through.

Meanwhile, Deep Thoughts from one of the ringleaders, "The first time I took an African American history class, I started self harming. I found it completely overwhelming, just trying to deal with the pain caused by constantly thinking about the long list of traumas Black people have faced in this country." This comes from the column "POC Talk".

POC Talk is a space to focus on the unique experiences people of color face at Evergreen and in Olympia. It is written by Evergreen Student of Color in an effort to specifically discuss POC issues.

Let us meet the authoress, one Felix Chrome (sure):

Felix likes to read and loves to party. Felix likes to read and loves to party. According to her OkCupid she spends her time “working on becoming a liberal arts school drop out, borrowing books from like library and not reading them, and pretending to write poetry.” If she isn’t at the salon of spending all night in the office working on the paper, you can find her downtown drinking shitty beer and talking about anarchy.

Person of Color. OK pale pink is a color, but I am thinking she is missing a fundamental concept of The Struggle™.

Ripley

This is what a commitment to diversity instead of quality along with complete PC subjugation to the leftist talking points: utter chaos. By all means,we need more of this everywhere.

Spiny Norman

For a sense of perspective, Evergreen State College has been referred to as "Cannabis U" for years.

Here is the short of it: Generally academically weak faculty (I didn't take any science classes so this only stands for the Arts) who show a general disinterest in their students. An administration that has no formal method for dealing with complaints or the lack of academic merit of most Arts programs.
Science classes at Evergreen? I can't imagine anything beyond "Organic Hydroponics".

Spiny Norman

WTP,

Notable alumni include Matt Groenig.

And Rachel Corrie, aka "St Pancake".

rachelcorrieflagburning

Link

Spiny Norman

Farnsworth,

I see. So there existed magnificent African cities and civilization (for which there is no archeological evidence), but all were wiped out by knuckle dragging honkey cave men. OK, I am guessing that idea wasn't completely thought through.

It's part of a popular American black mythology created W.E.B. DuBois - an "Out of Africa" theory - and concocted nearly out of thin air, loosely based on Napoleonic-era French Freemasons' complete misunderstanding pharaonic hieroglyphs (believing they were magic symbols and represented technology that is now lost to the world) - and assumed because Egypt existed on the continent of Africa the people could only have been sub-Saharan blacks - despite the fact that the Egyptians always depicted themselves as brown, with Hittites and Greeks as white and sub-Saharan Nubians as black.

Tim Newman

I'm sorry, but I have no sympathy for the professor or the administration of the university at this point. If they haven't got the sense to leave these idiots in the hall and go down the pub (or do something else more worthwhile of their time) then they deserve all the derision being heaped on them. He should have walked out ages ago.

Spiny Norman

created by

(I have always been good a proofreading others' work, but my own, not so much.)

Spiny Norman

(Oh, I give up. Maybe more coffee will help...)

David

I have always been good a proofreading others’ work, but my own, not so much.

You should start a blog.

Rian

What kind of prick goes to university and starts making lists of *demands*?

David

What kind of prick goes to university and starts making lists of *demands*?

The kind of pricks in the video, I should imagine.

Lisboeta

The Internet never forgets. Taking down one video will not help. In fact, the hysterical reaction has now garnered sufficient notice that aforesaid video will have been saved/viewed in umpteen locations (aka Streisand effect). I'm surprised these students didn't realise that.

... On reflection, I'm not surprised.

Spiny Norman

You should start a blog.

Sorry for spamming the thread. I'll try to limit myself to one comment at a time in the future.

I think I'll drop some change in the "swear jar" as penance. ;-)

David

Sorry for spamming the thread.

It’s all good. One day I’ll publish Dave’s Most Gripping Typos, featuring my more hilarious and deflating blunders.

David

swear jar

Now there’s an idea. :-)

Pogonip

American trivia: "geoduck" is correctly pronounced "gooey-duck," and the school's fight--er, cooperative non-racist non-sexist non-ablist recreation--song, begins " Go geoducks go!" Which makes more sense than what those overgrown toddlers were blathering on about.

R. Sherman

I may have missed it, but do these victims of oppression provide actual examples or other evidence that Evergreen is the center of racial animus? Or are they just pulling stuff out of their entitled, middle-class asses?

Pogonip

This seems like a good time to ask: does anyone else like old books, really old books, published before ca. 1970? I love them. They're so clear. An author didn't have to spend 12 paragraphs explaining why a Stone Age lifestyle in the Amazon is just as comfortable as an industrialized lifestyle, because any dern fool could see that wasn't so. ( Although there was a lady from an Amazon tribe who married an American, ended up disliking the American '70's lifestyle, and returned to the Amazon. But even she didn't say industrialism was worse overall, just that she found it too complicated, lonely, and noisy.)

An old-time author could just state his piece. He or she didn't have to convolute his or her prose, nor did he or she have to waste a lot of his or her, and the readers', time carefully avoiding pronouns so he or she didn't offend his or her 22-year-old feminist editor by failing to insert one "or she" into an 800-page manuscript, because the Deity knows women are too dumb to understand that "He who hesitates is lost" also applies to us.

I am currently enjoying 20th-century sorceress, or mystic, or something like that, Dion Fortune. She's great. She writes about New Age woo-woo as if it were as practical as plumbing. Makes you want to sign up for the next term at Hogwarts.

Burnsie

...do these victims of oppression provide actual examples or other evidence that Evergreen is the center of racial animus?

Evidence? The president of the college is white! What more do you need?

David

do these victims of oppression provide actual examples or other evidence that Evergreen is the center of racial animus?

When not using mob harassment against members of staff - by surrounding them, blocking their exits (and lying about it), and screaming racial abuse at them - and when not complaining about their spiteful little drama being seen for what it is, the ‘protestors’ are also oppressed by the expectation that their academic work should be done on time, or indeed at all.

Pogonip

Evidence is a racist, sexist concept. They FEEL the college is [noun]ist. That's enough, you -ist pig.

Trevor

... does anyone else like old books, really old books, published before ca. 1970?

I was born into what would now be thought rather austere circumstances. My parents both worked long hours in a variety of jobs and literally had little time for reading, but nonetheless managed to teach me to read by the age of three using a combination of Aesop's Fables and the Brer Rabbit stories. Other than library books, all I had was Arthur Mee's Children's Encyclopaedia, which was a glorious feast but already very dated and out of favour by the 1960s. Its discovery in a home with young children would these days occasion their removal by social workers and a public enquiry. I can't recommend it highly enough.

Microbillionaire
Its discovery in a home with young children would these days occasion their removal by social workers and a public enquiry. I can't recommend it highly enough.

I have an old songbook along those lines, containing Old Boy Noah and other songs about wine and knives and cripples and fire.

sk60

students... yelling and ranting about everything from “racist white teachers” and “white-ass administrators”

The only racists I can see are the students.

Tim Newman

This seems like a good time to ask: does anyone else like old books, really old books, published before ca. 1970? I love them. They're so clear.

Last time I was back in the UK I got hold of my mother's old recipe books from the 1960s. Some of the handwritten recipes in there are from her mother, my grandmother, and probably date from the 1940s or 1950s. What I noticed is how straight to the point the recipes are: they tell you what ingredients are needed and what you do with them, no woffle about "making things nice and fluffy" or demands that you use "fresh, organic parsley". And because they're not written by a celebrity there is no need for the author to spend half the book going on about themselves.

Darleen

ostensible student near the end talks about "My ancestors were brought here as slaves, your ancestors were not, they came here of their own free-will"

What presumption! Many melanin-enriched people in America do not have any American-slave ancestors and many people of pallor DO.

::::ahem:::: Irish

(my family was brought here against their will in 1697 and sold to work on a Virginia plantation. Took them approximately 60 years to gain their freedom...bet that would be a shock to the Darker-than-Thou snowflake)

R. Sherman

Re: Old Books

A year ago, I moved my mother from her home to a senior living apartment. In the process of clearing out her stuff, I came across a box of our old children's books, which I rescued. I have a 1940ish edition of Little Black Sambo, which caused raised eyebrows when I was a kid in the '60s. (In first grade, ca. 1967, my mom suggested I take another book for "show and read" day at school.) I can't decide whether to erect a shrine to it in protest of political correctness or secret it away, like a radio in occupied Europe, to avoid the possibility of reeducation.

BTW, merely thinking about the title causes me to crave pancakes.

Bob

Washington state has no history of slavery and until very recently was probably 95% White. So why do they choose to live in such an awful racist White state?

Darleen

I have a 1940ish edition of Little Black Sambo,

I remember in high school (68-72) a fave for cheap, good breakfast food after football games was Sambo's Restaurant. (there's only one left in operation in Santa Barbara)

David

ostensible student

That.

JerryC

TESC has been a hotbed of the most extreme forms of hippie lunacy for decades now. In a sense, the rest of academia is just now catching up to it.

Pogonip

I have my mom's 1952 Good Housekeeping Cookbook. It has all sorts of straightforward information: a whole chapter listing what to do with leftovers, a chapter on garnishes, a chapter on cooking for one, a chapter on cooking for two, a chapter on pressure cooking ( the crockpot hadn't come along yet), a chapter on marketing. There's a very useful chapter on how best to carve various meats and fowl at the table, called (quelle horreur!) "When He Carves."

When you use this book you are saddened by what's been lost. There are recipes involving raw eggs, which are no longer safe to consume in the U.S., and paragraphs assuring the reader than any meat with a U.S. Department of Agriculture stamp has been inspected by same and is safe to eat. This was true in 1952 but isn't now. Now the meat packer inspects his own meat and reports the results to USDA. That's much more efficient, you see.

Pogonip

I had "Little Black Sambo" too, and don't recall much about it, but I am quite sure it took place in India, not Africa? His parents who sent him on the errand, whatever it was, were Mumbo and Jumbo, and after the tigers chased each other round the tree until they turned into butter, the family happily chowed down on pancakes. So Sambo outwits the tigers--the Indian tigers--and everybody lives happily ever after. I don't understand why this is considered insulting to persons of black African ancestry. Shrug.

R. Sherman

@Darleen

My dad worked a year for the Military Industrial Complex in L.A. during the mid-'60s. Sambo's was our go-to post-church restaurant for Sunday lunch. I think the one we patronized was on Brookhurst(?) in Anaheim.

Daniel Ream

does anyone else like old books, really old books, published before ca. 1970?

I avoid any fantasy or science fiction published after 1983 or so, although for different reasons. As far as fiction goes I've found a great deal of enjoyment in historical fiction, usually mysteries; there seems to be less temptation by the author to clean things up for modern sensibilities.

As for cooking, I learned how to cook out of my mother's 1960's vintage Better Homes and Gardens New Cookbook. The first third or so is just "how to" and "what this cooking term means". I think basic skills have gotten lost in the explosion of foodie blogs and pretentious eating; I cringe every time I see some terribly hip foodie slicing things with their index finger along the spine of the wrong knife for what they're doing.

Pogonip

Hi Daniel, why do you avoid fantasy and science fiction published after '83?

I recommend Rick Yancey's books, from the 2000's, if you don't mind blood and guts. Except for the last one in the "Monstrumologist" series. That one wasn't very good, but the first 3 are great.

WTP


I had "Little Black Sambo" too, and don't recall much about it, but I am quite sure it took place in India, not Africa? His parents who sent him on the errand, whatever it was, were Mumbo and Jumbo, and after the tigers chased each other round the tree until they turned into butter, the family happily chowed down on pancakes. So Sambo outwits the tigers--the Indian tigers--and everybody lives happily ever after. I don't understand why this is considered insulting to persons of black African ancestry. Shrug.

This. No tigers in Africa as anyone could know, but anyone (anyone?) who knows of Monty Python should know. Sambos restaurant, as noted above, was a very good breakfast establishment. WTH did sub-continent Sambo have to do with the civil rights of African descendants such that the story, which has no white people in it, which in no way demeans the character any more than Alice in Wonderland, should drive such hysteria? Yes, some rednecks and such used references to the character derisively, but screw them. This was an opportunity to rise above the racism, but the civil rights crowd took the racist bait. As Brietbart said, politics is downstream of culture. The African descendents allowed the racist rednecks to define them wrongly in so many ways. Absurd.

Hal

I avoid any fantasy or science fiction published after 1983 or so,

Hmmmmmm.

Neuromancer


A Small Colonial War


Discworld


The Nightside

champ

@Farnsworth

"Person of Color. OK pale pink is a color, but I am thinking she is missing a fundamental concept of The Struggle™"

Maybe she's the millenial version of Rachel Dolezal...

R. Sherman

I learned how to cook out of my mother's 1960's vintage Better Homes and Gardens New Cookbook.

Bingo. Plus a Betty Crocker cookbook and a few specialty cookbooks of the era. My nieces snatched those up when my mom moved. In the early '70s, my mom went back to work after my brother started junior high. She placed us in charge of preparing dinner for the family and we were instructed to have it ready to go when our dad got home*. To facilitate that charge, she would leave ingredients in the fridge and one of the cookbooks open to a recipe on the counter. Eventually, we just started doing our own thing, including meal planning for a week for four. To this day, both he and I are better cooks than our wives.

*One morning before Dad left for work, he announced that he would love to have Crêpes Suzette for dessert that evening. My brother presented him with purple Jello and fruit topped with Cool Whip. When my dad laughed and said, "That's not Crêpes Suzette," my brother said, "Oh. I thought you said Grape Suzette."

Pogonip

I have yet to see a SJW provide an explanation as to why you can "identify" as the other sex but not as another race.

I identify as Romulan, at least until I use up all that green lipstick left over from Halloween.

Darleen

I think the one we patronized was on Brookhurst(?) in Anaheim.

That was one we went to, mostly the one in Fullerton on Harbor Blvd.

Darleen

I avoid any fantasy or science fiction published after 1983

Hugh Howey, Brandon Sanderson, Larry Correia ... I SO enjoy their books (among others), even as I go back and read my favorite Heinlein, Zenna Henderson and Bradbury.

Pogonip

I started one of Larry's books--the one where the hero achieves the American dream by throwing his boss out a skyscraper window--and now I always refer gun-porn fans to his work. I read very little gun-porn, but I bet Larry's the funniest writer in that field. Viva the Mountain That Writes!

Ray

If I behaved like that and people tolerated it, I would ask myself why? Is it because I'm worth tens of thousands of dollars to them? It's like, when a salesman is too pleased to see you, you think, am I paying too much?

"We wuz kangz." There is an SF theory that magic was real, but it was all used up about 3000 years ago. Since then we've had to do stuff the hard way. Some people adapted better than others.

Pogonip

It's because they're worth tens of thousands to the college, if not to anyone else.

WTP

It's because they're worth tens of thousands to the college, if not to anyone else.

And they're only worth tens of thousands of dollars to the college because they got their tens of thousands of dollars from our pockets. The education provided by the institution is only valued such because it is being purchased with other people's money. The professors, the lib arts and humanities ones at least, have essentially no-show or no-effort jobs. The professors and administrators are not the suckers here. The taxpayers are.

Daniel Ream

There are exceptions; I've read all of Green's Nightside series, but like all pulp serial fiction you can pinpoint exactly the spot where he gets bored of the whole thing and starts phoning it in.

To answer the question posed, I avoid most fantasy written post-1983 or so because that's the point where D&D swallowed the fantasy lit genre whole. I don't know if it's related, but that's about the same time "fantasy" and "science fiction" started becoming conceptually separate genres, to the point that authors separated themselves into only writing one or the other. Prior to that most F/SF authors wrote both.

The long term upshot of D&D's tropes becoming more-or-less synonymous with fantasy means that a whole generation of college kids who have never been exposed to any fantasy lit - or indeed, anything else really - other than D&D and its spawn have grown up and begun writing fantasy lit of their own. Where once fantasy and SF authors had significant life experiences of their own, or a deep scholarship of history and literature to draw on, there are now multiple bestselling fantasy authors whose entire corpus is literally their college D&D campaigns put to paper. That doesn't make for good literature.

As for science fiction, somebody upthread mentioned Larry Correia. While I'm not much for gun porn and so don't read his stuff, the Sad Puppies campaign will tell you everything you need to know about what's wrong with SF lit today.

And because it will annoy Hal: Sad Puppies is also why I've never been a huge fan of the Discworld novels; I'm not a huge fan of pretentiously didactic metaphor.

Hal

why I've never been a huge fan of the Discworld novels; I'm not a huge fan of pretentiously didactic metaphor.

Well, actually, Hunh??!!!

Do explain---or at the very least, where do you get pretentiously didactic?

David

A click-through timeline of the Evergreen drama can be found here. The particulars of the students’ demands are quite revealing, in a spitefully totalitarian way.

Note that the ‘protestors’ complain about not being paid for their “labour,” i.e., their ‘protest’, i.e., harassing and slandering anyone who disagrees with them or who fails to defer with sufficient promptness. Note too the extent to which the ‘protestors’ are indulged by the university president, as if the Mao-lings’ vindictive, dishonest and self-flattering pantomime were being acted out in good faith.

David

I’m sorry, but I have no sympathy for the professor or the administration of the university at this point.

The university president George Bridges is certainly complicit. Judging by the video, he’s an absurd figure, contemptibly effete. He’s seen repeatedly enabling the pathological behaviour and continues to do so even after the Mao-lings have treated his staff with imaginative vindictiveness. His willingness to pretend, despite all absurdity, that the students are both victims and virtuous – rather than spiteful opportunists and openly malevolent – robs him of any credibility.

And look at the thanks he receives for his prostrations.

Jonathan

We wuz kangz.

I've posted This before, but it's worth doing again.

Tom

Apologies for going back off thread but Trevor's comment yesterday at 17:52 caused me to google Arthur Mee's Children's Encyclopaedia and led to this from the Wikipedia entry. Apparently the encyclopaedia was published by a U.S. publisher under the name, The Book of Knowledge which will help to understand the following:

In May 1973 riots occurred in Jammu and Kashmir, India, in an area where the Jamaat-e-Islami was gaining influence, sparked by the discovery that an illustration contained in The Book of Knowledge, which had been stored in a local library for decades, portrayed the Archangel Gabriel dictating portions of the Quran to Muhammad. Muslims offended by a visual depiction of Muhammad caused riots which left four dead and over a hundred wounded. The sale of the encyclopedia was then banned, although it was already out of print by that time.

You could change 1973 to 2017 and it would be completely plausible.

Lisboeta

Me, me, me!

So her/his/its reaction to "the pain caused by constantly thinking about the long list of traumas Black people have faced in this country" was ... self-harming?

Burnsie

And look at the thanks he receives for his prostrations.

Well, he's getting what he bargained for. Good and hard.

JonathaN

You could change 1973 to 2017 and it would be completely plausible.

You could change 1973 to 973 and it would still be completely plausible.

David

Evergreen’s gay emo goth squad shows its tolerance.

David
If a [student] mob comes for you, there is a good chance that the president of your university will side with the mob and validate its narrative… You must assume that one or more of its members is willing to use violence against you, and you can assume that many members of the mob believe that violence against you is morally justifiable.

Jonathan Haidt on the Mao-ling psychodrama at Evergreen.

Tom
You could change 1973 to 973 and it would still be completely plausible.

True, nice addition JonathaN.

David

Here’s the university president’s written response to the students’ mob delinquency. It begins,

I’m George Bridges, I use he/him pronouns.

It goes downhill from there.

Sporkatus

@Daniel Ream: Are you familiar with Gene Wolfe? Slow sometimes, and very heavy style of writing, but could never, ever be mistaken for anyone's D&D campaign. His Book of the Long Sun and Book of the Short Sun are fantasy taking place *after* interstellar colonization, and his The Knight and The Wizard are an interesting take on loosely Arthurian legend through a lens of early Norse myth.

He got started well before your cutoff date, but most of his written work has been since.

Jonathan

nice addition JonathaN

Thanks. I inadvertently hit caps there though.

Trevor

Via the chaps/chapesses over at Gay Patriot, a reminder that Evergreen has what one might call 'form'. I'm still surprised that Obama didn't contrive to pardon this gentleman and install him on the Supreme Court. Perhaps he wasn't all bad.

Marko

I disgusted by the colonialist use of the term "black" without capitalization in these comments on this site. Show some respect.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/public_editor/2017/05/26/respect-dignity-and-fairness-conveyed-in-capital-letters-public-editor.html

David

a reminder that Evergreen has what one might call ‘form’.

It must be strange to spend so much time acting out a contrarian adolescence, always in search of some parent-dismaying posture. I’m thinking of the lecturers, the supposed grown-ups, but the students too.

Daniel Ream

@Daniel Ream: Are you familiar with Gene Wolfe?

Yes, he's on the Pile of Shame :D

Don't think that it's some kind of hard and fast calendar date, it's more an awareness of the general shift in publishing trends that occurred about that time.

As a tangent, the unforeseen success of Harry Potter caused many publishers to print everything in their children's fantasy slushpiles in the hopes of cashing in. Some of the best fantasy I've read, period, was written in the children's fantasy genre in the last ten years.

As for Discworld, Hal - the early books are satirizing a genre which, like comic books, is largely pointless to satirize; the later books are, as I said, pretentiously didactic metaphor (or did it escape your notice that "Moist von Lipwig" and "Ludwig von Mises" sound awfully similar?)

Trevor

... the colonialist use of the term "black" without capitalization ...

For people who proudly assemble ludicrous names out of random selections of letters and misused diacritics to get so sniffy about nuances of orthography when so much of their identity is centred on a part of the world that produced precisely zero written languages strikes one as a bit rich, frankly.

R. Sherman

N.B., the incident which forms the basis for the lunacy at Evergreen was an email between Professor Weinstein and the Diversity administrator. Query, how was the lynch mob summoned, if not by the administration itself publicizing the "blasphemy?" I would appear that Diversity Offices on college campuses are now functioning as a Praetorian guard who must be appeased constantly, lest they decide to engage in (metaphorical) assassination.

Spiny Norman

David,

Evergreen’s gay emo goth squad shows its tolerance.

I can only imagine the dire consequences for the target of the gay emo goth Red Guards had he even attempted to defend himself...

It goes downhill from there.

Fergawdssakes, how could it not? What a spineless, pretentious twat that man is...

Marko,

the colonialist use of the term "black" without capitalization

To be clear, as Collins said in a memo to newsroom editors, the Star will not be capitalizing white or brown because “they do not describe a shared identity and experience the way Black does.”

As Anthony Morgan, a Toronto human rights and civil liberties lawyer, told her, “there’s a fundamental criteria of human rights at stake here.

“Blacks have a desire to have that capital B. The principles of self-identification are essential. We are trying to assert our Blackness, we are trying to assert our humanity in a language that was not ours to begin with, and now we have to suffer the indignity when our oppressors who benefit from the structure tell us we are not right.

“Not capitalizing the B diminishes Blackness.”

Conversely, not capitalizing the W diminishes "Whiteness" intentionally. To do otherwise would surely provoke uncontrollable rage among the "diverse community they serve".

The Toronto Star has always had more than a little Guardian-esque silliness about it; they're just shouting it from the rooftop now.

R. Sherman

Conversely, not capitalizing the W diminishes "Whiteness" intentionally.

Thus, we move to "Caucasian," even though most of us know bubkus about the Caucasus.

WTP

even though most of us know bubkus about the Caucasus

When the actual, geographical area known as the Caucasus comes up, the context, the image of such as materializes in my mind is Prometheus chained to a rock in the Caucasus, where his liver is eaten daily by an eagle. His punishment for having given fire to humanity. Just thought I'd share that little piece of my psychosis. All context and stuff.

R. Sherman

Just thought I'd share that little piece of my psychosis.

Think of it as "Caucasian Privilege."

Spiny Norman

Thus, we move to "Caucasian," even though most of us know bubkus about the Caucasus.

Aside from Russian incursions into Georgia, the only context with which most people associate the Caucasus is the bloody, long-running Chechnyan conflict, yet because the Chechens are Moslems, they are automatically "oppressed brown people", you see?

Calico

Are these protesters aware that they are making themselves unhireable?
HR Departments look at "___ Studies" majors, especially from colleges with a reputation for protests, as radioactive. It's openly discussed in the HR world. When employers look at your resume and your online presence, if there are mentions of political activism and protests, your resume will be circular filed.
When these kids get through with school, they will be in for a very unpleasant surprise when they start looking for jobs.
(On a side note, any statistics on how many of these protesting snowflakes actually graduate? What is the graduation rate for Angry Studies majors?)

Farnsworth M Muldoon

“they do not describe a shared identity and experience the way Black does.”

Yes, because all blacks share the same identity and experiences, just ask born and raised in the ghetto by a single mother Ben Carson and raised in upper middle class Hawaii by white grandparents Barry O.

pst314

Thinking of this guy?
https://youtu.be/SV4Y_ensniY?t=26

pst314

Oops, the above comment was in reference to "They’re Stealing Our Black Essence"

jabrwok

Perhaps related, a new instantiation of Physics Envy:

https://www.thecollegefix.com/post/32830/

A feminist academic affiliated with the University of Arizona has invented a new theory of “intersectional quantum physics,” and told the world about it in a journal published by Duke University Press.

Alex deWinter
I avoid any fantasy or science fiction published after 1983

Add F. Paul Wilson to the list of authors who are well worth a look.

I remember in high school (68-72) a fave for cheap, good breakfast food after football games was Sambo's Restaurant.

I recall going there several times as a kid and loving the coloring placemats.

Alex

I'm still surprised that Obama didn't contrive to pardon this gentleman and install him on the Supreme Court. Perhaps he wasn't all bad.

My understanding is that the president can only pardon federal prisoners, whereas Mr. Cook is a state prisoner. The governor of Pennsylvania could pardon him.

Monty James

Jabrwok, surely that's another hoax, like the Conceptual Penis hoax? Like the Sokal Affair? Intersectional quantum physics just has to be another hoax. God, let it be another hoax, please, these keyboards cost money.

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