David Thompson
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July 17, 2017

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Connor

The authors say that “white men tend to be cited in much higher numbers than people from other backgrounds,” but dismiss the idea that this is due to the relative preponderance of white male geographers.

Math is hard.

Surreptitious Evil

I'm quite interested in their suggestion that non-academics should be cited. The current academic climate, at least in the journals my wife submits papers to, is entirely against this.

Also, "graduate students"? How the hell are people supposed to find 'publications' by graduate students? They aren't likely to be widely available, even on something as wide as Google Scholar.

Mike

‘poor me’ feminism

I thought it was supposed to be empowering?

David

I thought it was supposed to be empowering?

Judged by the commentary and behaviour of prominent feminists in the media and academia, the primary effect of feminism seems to be to make women whiny, joyless and neurotic, and more inclined to make excuses for their own inadequacies. And the more loudly feminism is embraced and advocated, the more pronounced and disagreeable those outcomes seem to be.

Tom
Math is hard.
- Barbie

Please use proper attribution.

tolkein

At last. A rational reason for all this diversity and equity stuff on campus. It'a a rational response to economic incentives. The solution, because all of the people doing diversity and equity are noble, driven by altruism and not grubby things like money, is to set a ceiling on such salaries. Maybe fix them at the average salary of oppressed people in the US? Then let's sit back with some pop corn and watch the reaction.

Nikw211

From The Huffington Post

Dr Tiffany Page of the Centre for Feminist Research at Goldsmith's College in London defining the difference between 'sexual harassment' and 'sexual misconduct' in Higher Education (my italics):

    We use the term ‘sexual misconduct’ to describe forms of power enacted by academic and professional staff in their relations with students. Sexual harassment is one of a number of behaviours encompassed by misconduct, which can include assault, grooming, bullying, sexual invitations, comments, non-verbal communication, creation of atmospheres of discomfort and hostility, and promised resources in exchange for sexual access. While harassment certainly does occur, the term ‘sexual harassment’ captures only some of the possible abuses of power that may be enacted by staff in connection to students.

I wonder what "comments" encompasses? Could an off-the-cuff 'dad' joke suddenly be ruled an act of sexual aggression if spoken at the wrong time in front of the 'wrong' person?

Even "hostility", which on the face of it seems clear and even fairly reasonable, begs the question of definition because if even "non-verbal communication" can lead to "hostility" then what could not be included in such wide-ranging term? What kind of gestures, stances, or glances could be redefined as displays of aggression under such an elastic phrase (I assume they do not mean overt gestures such as flipping the bird or other vulgar hand signs)? How on earth would they ever be able to define what that means in practice let alone actually identify effective means of determining the truth of any accusation based on an act of "non-verbal communication"? How could even a witness be used to support or refute an accusation that person A looked at person B 'funny'?

But the one that really made my jaw go crashing to the floor is "creation of atmospheres of discomfort".

This, surely, could not be anything other than Kafkaesque if it were ever to become actual policy? And from that point of view it seems hardly better than the poison it is meant to be a cure for.

Are there some professors who abuse their position and enter into inappropriate relations with their students? Yes, there are. Of course there are. And taking action to prevent such behaviour is a laudable goal in and of itself.

But to expand the definition of this kind of offence to include "creation of atmospheres of discomfort" seems, quite frankly, absolute folly. It is all too easy to imagine how such a broad definition could be exploited for personal gain by the malevolent, the maladjusted or the just plain mad. Besides, it seems to me to be completely unrelated to solving the problem of inappropriate and abusive behaviour.

It seems like a charter for transforming campuses into a state much like Florence under Savonarola.

David

such a broad definition could be exploited for personal gain by the malevolent, the maladjusted or the just plain mad.

Which, presumably, is why such carefully sweeping language is used, repeatedly.

WTP

Math is hard

My OCD is even harder. Thus I am compelled to point out that $175K is closer to four times the average salary of nearly $45K. $180K vs. $135K. Of course OCD and approximations are a bad combination.

Matt

A sheet compiling the salaries of the top diversity administrators at 43 of America’s top public universities finds that virtually all are paid at least $100,000, with some going well beyond $300,000. The average of $175,088 per year is more than three times the average American’s salary of $44,980. The lowest salary identified by Campus Reform is $83,237, still almost twice as much as the average American salary. A 2016 report by American Association of University Professors found that the average professor salary across ranks was $79,424. In one example, an administrator at Rutgers University named Jorge Schement, vice chancellor of the office of diversity and inclusion, made $253,262 in 2016, while most faculty at Rutgers in 2015 made less than $50,000 a year.

Given that these types seem to constitute a sort of secular priesthood these days, they could at least take a vow of poverty...

Black Ball

So are the administrators in positions of power across the globe in our higher learning instituions for or against free uni?

Ed Snack

WTP, surely that should be CDO, so THE LETTERS ARE IN THE RIGHT ORDER !

David

I am compelled to point out that $175K is closer to four times the average salary

Somewhat related.

David

Tim Newman reflects on the joys of Manchester:

Never in my life, anywhere else, have I… climbed aboard a bus and found somebody has sandpapered the windows and set fire to the seats. In Manchester, this was all perfectly normal.

The place does seem to have an unusually large sociopathic underclass.

David
Will Self observed… that all of Britain’s professional writers could attend a modestly sized cocktail party. The same is true of many courses, but especially those in the creative arts and the social sciences. There were more journalism students at my university than there are journalists in the United Kingdom.

Ben Sixsmith on the higher education racket.

Sporkatus

Remember when Minnow assured us that tattoos were not something that it was fair to judge people by, and that the ostentatiously tattooed were almost certainly better hires?

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11889732

David

The Oamaru-born teenager says he had it inked a few months ago, while drunk on homebrew in a jail cell in Christchurch.

He chose… poorly.

Though I do like the blurb below it: “Do you have a similar story to share?”

Jeanne Crain

Heather MacDonald:

The federal action, filed under Title IX with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, rests on a few juvenile frat-house pranks deliberately designed to violate feminist taboos. On October 13, 2010, the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity forced its pledges to chant “No means yes, and yes means anal” while marching blindfolded in the freshman quad. In 2009, some athletes and fraternity brothers circulated an anonymous e-mail ranking female freshmen by the number of beers the sender would have to drink before having sex with them. And in 2008, 12 pledges to the Zeta Psi fraternity photographed themselves outside the Yale Women’s Center, the wellspring of the college’s most unhinged feminist agitation, holding small signs that read WE LOVE YALE SLUTS.

Here are a few possible responses to these incidents. Roll your eyes at the immaturity of boys and go back to studying for your chemistry exam. Stage counter-demonstrations outside the DKE and Zeta Psi fraternities giving out the toll-free number for Viagra prescriptions as an antidote to the brothers’ well-known performance problems. Announce a sex boycott of the offending fraternities and athletes until they send every freshman girl roses and chocolates.

That wise precept, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me,” has obviously long disappeared among the sisterhood, however. So, too, has the idea of keeping things in perspective. The DKE brothers’ tasteless pledge prank was just that: a tasteless pledge prank. What is the most provocative thing you could say on a college campus today, the thing most likely to outrage the largest and most influential power bloc? “No means yes.” To inflate this incident into a symbol of anything beyond an unfunny effort at transgression on the part of a trivially small (and marginalized) number of individuals requires a willful blindness to the reality of Yale.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Toni Airaksinen on the priorities of academic feminists:

Their argument in its simplest and most real form is that it is easier to crank out more garbage and protect their phony-baloney jerbs if they don't even have to make any pretext of substantiating their "work".

He chose… poorly.

Indeed, but a little bit of laser removal and a beard/moustache would solve his problem.

David

Indeed, but a little bit of laser removal and a beard/moustache would solve his problem.

Oh, I think the tattoo itself is just one of his problems, a secondary effect. Being the kind of person who ends up in jail for aggravated robbery - and who, while there, thinks it’s a good idea to get a huge facial tattoo that screams “do not employ” - is perhaps the bigger problem. And harder to fix.

Sonny Wayze

Mattress Girl's victim has (presumably) collected a wad of cash from Columbia:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/columbia-university-settles-gender-bias-suit-by-man-in-mattress-girl-accusations/

Should he stage a 'Carry That Weight' performance piece there by toting a large canvas bag stencilled $$$ ?

Sporkatus
Being the kind of person ...aggravated robbery...huge facial tattoo
A huge tattoo while drunk in that selfsame prison on prison hooch, and while still a teen, concurrent with becoming a teen father.

Why, it's almost as if the tattoo is suggestive of a wider pattern of bad judgment or something. Unfair of me to notice, according to the bait fish, but there it is.

Also rather obvious to point out that "I was drunk" only goes any sort of length as a bad behavior excuse if the getting drunk and choice of associations in prison are not themselves suggestive of very, very bad judgment. Which they are.

Surreptitious Evil

and who, while there, thinks it’s a good idea to get a huge facial tattoo that screams “do not employ” - is perhaps the bigger problem. And harder to fix.

A brief neck-trim would solve society's problem?

Pogonip

http://everydayfeminism.com/2016/07/questions-i-ask-myself-before-sex/

I cannot imagine what life must be like when you monitor your emotional temperature every moment of every day.

R. Sherman

It’s what’s keeping women out of STEM, apparently.

I am soooooo tired of the hyperventilating regarding the lack of distaff STEM graduates, ostensibly because of some sort of institutional oppression. I have a son in STEM and one neck deep in his college search. If a female high school graduate expresses even the most vague interest in a STEM field, colleges and universities will fight to the death to entice her to their campuses. They do everything except roll up a Brinks truck to her door and dump bags of $100 bills on her porch. It's not STEM's fault that women gravitate toward majors heavy on the "feelz."

Jonathan

The authors say that “white men tend to be cited in much higher numbers than people from other backgrounds,” but dismiss the idea that this is due to the relative preponderance of white male geographers.

A global map of scientific papers published might be somewhat instructive as to why this could be:

David

It’s not STEM's fault that women gravitate toward majors heavy on the “feelz.”

Again, I’m reminded of Celia Edell, a “feminist philosopher interested in social justice,” who claims that, being a woman, she’s a “gender minority” in academia, and therefore oppressed – albeit in ways never quite specified or convincing. This claim is aired despite the preferential hiring of women across much of academia, including in departments of philosophy, despite the fact that women earn a majority of both Batchelors and Masters degrees, and despite the fact that Ms Edell inhabits an environment where female students outnumber male students by quite some margin.

Needless to say, lecturers in gender studies tend to have qualifications in English literature, rather than, say, biology or neuroscience. Both of which, you’d imagine, might be more appropriate, at least if the objective were to find things out, and not merely indoctrinate.

Spiny Norman

Tim Newman reflects on the joys of Manchester:

Even now, when people tell me to be careful somewhere, or ask if I was afraid in (say) Paris, I laugh and say “God no, I lived in Manchester, FFS!”

Vaguely related: in 1968, my family lived for a brief time in Compton, California (as in "Straight Outta..."). The particular neighborhood were we lived, at the time, was mostly Samoans and old white people, and was fairly well kept and a generally pleasant place. That was nearly 50 years ago, and I definitely do not want to see it now.

David

He’s using the full power of that English degree.

Tweet of the day, I think.

Oh, and click through for the endorsement of Mr Cooper by Hanna Brooks Olsen, mentioned here previously, and who is also struggling to find a use for her needlessly expensive English literature degree.

Spiny Norman

R. Shermasn,

It's not STEM's fault that women gravitate toward majors heavy on the "feelz."

Why, yes it is: STEM fields must adapt, and become more focused on "feelings" and less on mere cis-hetero-patriarchal "numbers" and "facts". The old white males clinging to the old white ways must understand that there are no "wrong" answers (except their old white ones).

[ now I've given myself a headache ]

Sam Duncan

“At last. A rational reason for all this diversity and equity stuff on campus. It'a a rational response to economic incentives.”

Was that ever in doubt?

R. Sherman

So much for basic history knowledge. Via Ace.

Sporkatus

It really must be asked - first use of time machine:
1. Kill Hitler, or
2. Diversify Dunkirk, and make sure it gets referred to as "D-Day"?

Billy Whiz

Was particuarly touched by the travails of the woman scientist trying to overcome the gender barriers of the polar potty break.
As a man who is for some reason totally incapable of defecating standing up (and God knows, I have tried), I can certainly sympathise...

David

As a man who is for some reason totally incapable of defecating standing up (and God knows, I have tried),

I’m… not sure how to respond to that.

Hal

Will Self observed… that all of Britain’s professional writers could attend a modestly sized cocktail party. . . . There were more journalism students at my university than there are journalists in the United Kingdom.

Rather a number of years ago there was a general computer Stuff magazine that would finish an issue with a guest essay. One particular issue---and I'd love to track down a copy at some point---had someone telling of training to be a software coder way back even further.

He and his tiny cluster of, say, 75 classmates hung out among their computer lab(s) and did the exercises and got their grades, and, in time, graduated. The writer went off to one job, and then another, and then another. A particular friend of his didn't bother, stayed at their uni, and taught.

Twenty years went by and the writer then went back to that uni to join his friend and also teach, bringing in the what it's like out there point of view---'cause twenty years on, coding had become the big thing to do, where by that point even hipsters---which would have been preppies and then yuppies at that point---can make big money.

By that point the coding classes were enormous and filled entire lecture halls . . . . and then the writer started noticing a particular pattern. In the cavernous lecture hall, as the lecture progressed, off thataway someone's having lunch, thisaway is someone having a nap, that one's reading a newspaper, this other one over here is . . . Etc.

And in and amongst the obvious educational hangers on he had that rather definite coder over there, this one over here, there was that cluster of two or three over thataway, and once all the actual coding students were added up, the number came out to, oh, about, say, 75 . . .

Billy Whiz

Oops, sorry, I forgot to use these htlml tags: <sarcasm > </sarcasm>

Hal

Here are a few possible responses to these incidents. Roll your eyes . . . Stage counter-demonstrations . . . as an antidote to the brothers’ well-known performance problems. Announce a sex boycott . . .

In short, follow at least one established successful response with announcements such as I like Turtles! . . . Bring Back Crystal Pepsi!!


'Weird hobby!' Couple gain hordes of fans after picketing pro-life abortion clinic protests with witty inappropriate signs

Joan

'Feminist Critic Trashes New Doctor Who For Not Being Black And Transgender'

http://dailycaller.com/2017/07/17/feminist-critic-trashes-new-doctor-who-for-not-being-black-and-transgender/

Not a parody.

David

Not a parody.

Will gender-swapping the lead character actually make the series any good? As a child, I sort of liked the idea of Doctor Who, the premise, but what ended up on screen was almost always dire. Even the supposedly “classic” episodes seemed pretty ropey, veering into panto, even as a wee seedling. Now it’s pitched as an all-ages drama, so every year or so I watch an episode in the hope that it might have improved. I’m still waiting for that surprise.

Spiny Norman

Not a parody.

Who can tell anymore? Even blatantly obvious, over-the-top parody like The Peoples' Cube gets a disapproving ("pants on fire") write up by the decidedly left-leaning Politifact.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

So much for basic history knowledge.

2. Diversify Dunkirk, and make sure it gets referred to as "D-Day"?

As I rounded the corner of a trenchline on Pointe du Hoc I came face to face with a German soldier. My rifle was held high and, running full bore, I drove its bayonet into their chest delivering a mortal wound.

This is not an unusual sight for a Call of Duty game. It’s been commonplace since the series’ inception in 2003. But right there, in my first demo of the upcoming Call of Duty: World War II, I noticed a big difference.

I’d just killed a woman. A black woman. A black woman in a German uniform.

Apparently everyone is caving to the SJWs. Heaven forfend you should play a game as something you are not.

dcardno

Heaven forfend you should play a game as something you are not.

Like, for instance, an 18-year old from Nebraska, in 1944?

Hal

'Feminist Critic Trashes New Doctor Who For Not Being Black And Transgender'

I've not watched any of the show, but have read of bits in passing. So as I recall, there are recurring female characters that do rotate in and out, and certainly a big central bit is that the Doctor is a time traveler who does a shift from one body to another after awhile.

Sooo, to have everyone happy, the solution is obvious:
A) Have the Doctor and the assistant(s) all be female and some shade of other than white.
B) Very quickly have them all turn out to be trans, and for each person, for some reason which for each is carefully explained and shown to be quite sound, the color is all just wrong.
C) Given Doctor Who storyline advances in science and the basic bit of a Time Lord shifting time at will, use both to rather speed up the change(s)
D) By three episodes into the new season, all characters will be white males, and all critics will be completely happy because they did indeed get exactly what they wanted.

Monty James

In a recent academic journal article, two feminist professors claim that citing sources in scholarly articles contributes to “white heteromasculinity.”

This is lazy of me, but I'm simply going to copy what I had to say over at Kim du Toit's place:

Isn’t this a great time to be alive? Scholars of the future will write theses, earn doctorates, make whole careers erecting a field of study trying to figure out just what our civilization’s major malfunction was. Probably working in a stone abbey, in a world lit only by candles and torches.

Bronze Age, Iron Age, Age of Discovery, Renaissance, Enlightenment, Industrial Age; I wonder what they are going to call ours? The Great Squawking? The Era of Daft Cows? That Time of the Millennium?

Looking at the second picture of Professor Cockayne makes me think of the Fred Reed quote, “Without men, civilization would last until the oil needed changing.” Hmmm.

Daniel Ream

"creation of atmospheres of discomfort".

This, surely, could not be anything other than Kafkaesque if it were ever to become actual policy?

Hostile environment harassment is a well-codified bit of law in Our Fair Dominion. I've used it myself to put the boots to a particularly odious HR department.

It is all too easy to imagine how such a broad definition could be exploited for personal gain by the malevolent, the maladjusted or the just plain mad.

...and all too readily proved by the legal history here, yes.

If a female high school graduate expresses even the most vague interest in a STEM field, colleges and universities will fight to the death to entice her to their campuses.

After twenty years of women-only scholarships, mentoring programs, advertising, and insulting the faculty for being sexist, the percentage of women in my alma mater faculty (chemical engineering) has dropped by seven points. Good job, ladies.

lecturers in gender studies tend to have qualifications in English literature, rather than, say, biology or neuroscience.

I once knew a female schoolteacher who was inordinately proud of her multiple degrees in English, ethnomusicology, education, and neuroscience. I asked about the neuroscience degree, odd man out that it was, and discovered that she needed a science degree to get a higher pay grade in the public school system, and had made it through the program by trading sexual favours to the male students to do her coursework for her.

Will gender-swapping the lead character actually make [Doctor Who] any good?

The lone season with Chris Eccleston I quite enjoyed, as he portrayed the Doctor as the sort of person you could actually believe would choose to cold-bloodedly genocide an entire species for the greater good, as opposed to a mincing, twee fop.

This was of course what got him fired.

bgates

I’d just killed a woman. A black woman.

Yay feminism! Yay intersectional feminism!

I wonder what "comments" encompasses?

Harrumphs of agreement, elaborations upon the main point by the host, polite nods to the henchlesbians, an occasional appearance by a giant closing i tag who always looks frustrated, and once in a while there's cake.

Geezer

... a giant closing i tag ...

That would be the enormous sign hanging above the bar:

Pogonip

I vote for "The Great Squawking."

Chester Draws

If a female high school graduate expresses even the most vague interest in a STEM field, colleges and universities will fight to the death to entice her to their campuses.

My elder daughter is off doing Statistics at University. She found the pressure to do STEM, once it became clear she was very good at Maths, was horrendous. Indeed off-putting rather than inspiring.

David

The lone season with Chris Eccleston I quite enjoyed, as he portrayed the Doctor as the sort of person you could actually believe would choose to cold-bloodedly genocide an entire species for the greater good, as opposed to a mincing, twee fop.

Heh. Yes, when I saw the Eccleston episodes, I thought the series might even develop into something half-decent. But no.

Re the outrage, or alleged outrage, over a gender-bending Doctor, I wonder if, as a character, the Doctor’s apparent age may ultimately be more important than his maleness. Having a young(ish) actor playing the part never quite convinced me. The dynamic with the companions suggests an intergenerational aspect. As I read somewhere, “no teenager should fancy the Doctor.”

David

Inevitably, Laurie Penny has written an article about the new, female Doctor. Also inevitably, it turns into an article about herself and how much more enlightened she is than those awful people who think that a long-established male character should probably remain male.

Fred the Fourth

Chester,
Hmm. As it happens, a sort-of-niece of mine just got a Stats degree at UC Berkeley. I'll have to ask her if she felt pressured to do something more Science / Engineering.
In fact I'm seeing her next week. Do you suppose she'll be interested in having that discussion with me during her wedding reception?

Jacob

Inevitably, Laurie Penny has written an article about the new, female Doctor. Also inevitably, it turns into an article about herself

:-)

David

And another thing.

What’s strange to me is that the more the writers make the Doctor mouth earnest and clumsy speeches about helping and caring, the more dissonant and unconvincing the series becomes. In the last couple of episodes, which I watched with morbid curiosity, the Doctor basically abandons and dooms his two companions - the friends that he’s responsible for – in order to briefly delay the extinction of some random people he’s just met and will presumably never see again, and who are apparently destined to be Cyberman fodder regardless of what he does, or who he sacrifices. And this is something that we, the audience, are supposed to applaud.

Call it the Janeway Error.

Daniel Ream

The dynamic with the companions suggests an intergenerational aspect. As I read somewhere, “no teenager should fancy the Doctor.”

The original premise was educational; it was supposed to be a show about British history, with the Doctor as a sort of osteoporosis-ridden professorial type holding forth to a couple of moppets. One can't help but think it's gone off the rails a bit. Even Eccleston's Doctor, the first one to both express open amour for a companion and be the first one young enough for it to be not entirely squicky - it's still terribly awkward and seems forced, as if the Doctor is either being mind controlled or having Rose on in some elaborate gambit to genocide the Daleks again or something.

Call it the Janeway Error.

I can't find it in five minutes of Googling, but post-Roddenberry Exodus Kate Mulgrew indicated in an interview that the only way she could reconcile Janeway's erratic and occasionally horrifying behaviour was to assume she was suffering from massive PTSD as a result of losing much of her crew on their first mission. And so she intentionally started playing her that way. It may be apocryphal, but you can definitely see Janeway ratcheting up the crazy in the later seasons.

I suspect some of the problem with Doctor Who's wildly spinning moral compass is that the writers really have no idea who the Doctor is or what the show is about, beyond "being weird".

David

Doctor Who’s wildly spinning moral compass

There were, in fairness, a few nicely monstrous touches – for instance, the scene in the hospital with the pain relief that turned out to be just a volume control, so we couldn’t hear the screams. And I quite liked the Master’s two incarnations betraying each other, seemingly fatally. But what struck me most about those episodes was, as you say, the bizarrely inconsistent, and perverse, morality. Yes, Bill is eventually saved by a third party, but this is after the fact and unknown to our supposed hero, who has chosen to abandon and doom the people he’s supposed to care for, while lecturing everyone about the imperative to be compassionate.

It’s like an attempt at a moral fable written by someone with sociopathic leanings, and who doesn’t comprehend why anyone should find this behaviour an odd definition of virtue, let alone heroism.

Tom
It’s what’s keeping women out of STEM, apparently.

My wife was calling around trying to find summer programs to occupy our 16 year-old son and discovered a STEM summer school at Trinity (the one in Dublin with the Harry Potter library). She emailed an application and received a "Sorry, we're full" response.

She mentioned her disappointment to a work colleague, who, not jokingly, indicated that they'd probably reached their quota for boys. So my wife then reapplied using her gmail account with a very feminine name. She received information exhorting her to come almost instantaneously.

I ain't no perfessionul or nufin'... but it seems to me that you never need to exhort people to do things they want to do. Is it perhaps true that young women are just not interested in STEM to the degree young boys are? Probably, but only in our preening, virtue signalling culture would we make it double-plus ungood to think so.

Clam

The problem with Doctor Who.

https://www.samizdata.net/2013/06/the-problem-with-doctor-who/

Clam

Just noticed the Samizdata link links back here. :-)

David

Heh. Tentacles everywhere.

sH2

"Recent findings show that the proportion of high school seniors graduating with an A average...has grown sharply over the past generation, even as average SAT scores have fallen. In 1998, it was 38.9%. By last year, it had grown to 47%. That's right: Nearly half of America's Class of 2016 are A students. Meanwhile, their average SAT score fell from 1,026 to 1,002 on a 1,600-point scale — suggesting that those A's on report cards might be fool's gold."

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2017/07/17/easy-a-nearly-half-hs-seniors-graduate-average/485787001/

What grade inflation?

Spiny Norman

A-grade students getting 1002 on the SAT? What the hell? I graduated HS with a B grade average and scored a 1460*. SMDH.

(*My first attempt was a 1390 and I felt I hadn't done as well as a I should, so I took it again.)

David

A-grade students getting 1002 on the SAT?

The last item here is an interview with Dr Duke Pesta, in which he details the shocking ignorance of his students and the fact that it’s all but impossible, career-wise, for a professor to fail 40% of his students, even though 40% of his students really shouldn’t be there.

R. Sherman

...the shocking ignorance of his students...

Which is why we get tweets or even op-eds in major national publications bemoaning the lack of POC in the movie Dunkirk.

WTP

Here's the thing about the other 60%, a good number of them survived by taking in what they were told, remembering it for a few hours/days, and spitting it back out on a sheet of paper only to be forgotten later. I'm quite certain Andrea Mitchell was one of them. Most of the MSM were good little students, I am quite certain of that. And look what they have given us. Then there are those who are experts in a very, very thin slice of knowledge but lack the common sense that God gave a turnip, thus create havock when endowed with responsibilities beyond their ken.

As for that 40% who supposedly shouldn't have been there, I would guess that more than a handful were of the type that objected, vocally or internally, to being taught a certain amount of bollocks.

Nikw211

OT

    I own a hoodie that reads, “Police Murder People.” I don’t wear it ironically; I wear it because (spoiler alert) police have a habit of murdering people.

So says Black Lives Matter (Cambridge, US) organiser, spoken word poet, mother, freelance journalist and activist DiDi Delgado in her article/T-shirt and hoodie sales drive 'In Defense of Punching Cops: Why the original slave catchers can catch these hands'.

    ... I’m frequently referred to as a fanatic and an extremist in the comment sections of my articles and social media posts. I’ve even internalized this, and (like many queer Black organizers) have started referring to myself as a radical.

    [ ... ]

    From where I’m sitting, there are only two possible solutions ... We can continue to slowly build grassroots movements and increase pressure on the powers that be to abandon their regressive and oppressive regimes[,] or we can punch cops.

    I think both of these solutions have merit, but cop punching might solve our problem faster [ ... ] It ALWAYS comes down to the people rebelling and punching cops. It’s only a question of when.

David

I’ve even internalized this, and (like many queer Black organizers) have started referring to myself as a radical.

Yes, of course. She was forced to flatter herself.

David

With effortless presumption, Laurie Penny speaks on behalf of most interesting women:

How she knows this, and why it should be a good thing, remains unclear.

Joan

Most of the interesting women you know are far, far angrier than you'd imagine.

People who are always angry are usually dull and boring.

David

People who are always angry are usually dull and boring.

Well, yes. Chronic rage and congeniality aren’t obvious bedfellows. To say nothing of how a default bad mood might impair rational thought or a sense of proportion. But Laurie has said, many times, that what “terrifies” her is being unable to “stay angry.” As if being angry were a credential.

It reminds me of the unlovely Bidisha, a self-described “non-white angry political female,” who, writing in the Guardian, insisted that those who don’t share her chronic ill-temper are “lazy and complacent,” and worse, “they have no politics.” Because only leftist politics count, apparently.

PiperPaul

"what 'terrifies' her is being unable to 'stay angry.'"

Once again, people "outraged" on others' behalf - outrage that just happens to provide them with an income, status and attention.


Meh.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

I think both of these solutions have merit, but cop punching might solve our problem faster...

Somehow I don't think that is really going to work they way she thinks it will, though being locked up does remove worries about housing, food, and health care from the equation.

dcardno

It reminds me of the unlovely Bidisha...

The link is for 2010, and I've heard nothing of her in a long time - is that unlovely lass still writing for the Graun (etc), or has she faded from the scene?

David

has she faded from the scene?

Hard to care, really.

dicentra

Godfrey's been suspended; his sister Jodie steps in: https://twitter.com/JodieElfwick/status/887681064998711297

Wordness to the turdness

One of Jodie's adoring fans used the term WYPIPO, which I googled and found out is apparently a slang term meaning white people. But what's (slightly) amusing is the website I found that explained that to me.

It's called Negus Who Read ("Smart. Bold. Brilliant. Black."), "negus" apparently being a weird phoneticisation (is that a word?) of "niggers"; the idea being that nothing scares white people so much as "niggers who read". (I think that's an old Paul Mooney joke.)

What's funny about that? I hear you ask. Just that they tend to slam those words together like so: NEGUSWHOREAD - which makes their website appear to be called Negus Whore Ad. Which is considerably less woke and empowering.

I did say "slightly".

Fred the Fourth

"Negus"?
Wut? Negus is wine cut with water, drunk by such ladies of fashion as Fannie Price, at the Mansfield ball.

Wordness to the turdness

How dare you whitesplain

tolkein

I see Jodie Elfwick is now suspended, as is lisagravesart. Of course Twitter isn't run by SJW snowflakes. Why would you think that.

Rich Rostrom

"A sheet compiling the salaries of the top diversity administrators at 43 of America’s top public universities finds that virtually all are paid at least $100,000, with some going well beyond $300,000."

When Barack Obama was elected State Senator, Michelle Obama was hired by the University of Chicago as "Director of Diversity Outreach" at a salary of over $100,000/yr. When Barack was elected U.S. Senator, Michelle got a raise to over $300,000/yr. This reflected the immense importance of her position, which was left vacant when she became First Lady.

Rich Rostrom

Fred the Fourth | July 20, 2017 at 20:24: Negus is wine cut with water...

"Negus" is a traditional Abyssinian imperial title, last held by Haile Selassie. I don't know, but suspect the name for the drink may be derived from the title.

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