David Thompson
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September 17, 2017

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Clam

self-styled ‘progressives’, the self-imagined woke, calling a Jewish man “Nazi scum” and a “fascist xenophobe” because he opposes racism and thuggery,

These people are ignorant hysterics.

David

These people are ignorant hysterics.

Yes, the vehemence of the howling is matched only by its factual inaccuracy and general dementedness. The backpacked person of indeterminate gender - the one bellowing that, “The very nature of the world, of the planet, of humanity, is at stake” – doesn’t seem to know anything at all about Mr Shapiro’s actual views. It’s as if wildly disparate people and opinions were being liquidised into some kind of mental slurry. The reference points are so confused, so unmoored from reality, it’s hard to know to where to start.

David

Related:

The notion of microaggressions suggests that if I attack your politics, I’m attacking your identity — and that such political attacks are a form of “aggression” equivalent to violence. This is plainly un-American. No, speech isn’t violence, as we showed last night… We had a bunch of people who disagreed with me who attended the lecture. That was great, and I personally thanked them for their attendance. That apparently didn’t stop a few [protestors] from feeling supremely hurt by things they didn’t even have the stomach to hear.

Mr Shapiro’s talk and the subsequent Q&A - the one that was pre-emptively denounced in hysterical terms as “fascist,” “misogynist” and “xenophobic” - can be viewed in full here.

John Brady

I'm a longtime lurker who doesn't usually comment, but I'm horrified by the degraded idea that speech is a form of violence. It doesn't seem like it should be hard to challenge and address this, but I fear that this is simply the top rung of a very long ladder of inference.

There was a rather good comment by Aquinas on Spiked the other day, arguing that in this post-modern, relativist world the Left are clinging onto "discrimination" as being the only absolute. It's the first comment under http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/article/a-killing-in-harlow-the-shame-of-remainers/20327#.Wb5VXdHTXmo

As a practical person, I want to challenge this nonsense, but I'm at a loss how to. Depressing times.

David

I’m a longtime lurker who doesn’t usually comment,

Welcome aboard.

but I’m horrified by the degraded idea that speech is a form of violence.

And note that it’s the supposed educators and academic bureaucrats who are actively encouraging this poisonous conceit. This is the Long March, and look at its fruit.

Burnsie

...the one bellowing that, “The very nature of the world, of the planet, of humanity, is at stake” – doesn’t seem to know anything at all about Mr Shapiro’s actual views.

Doesn't seem to know anything at all about the world, the planet, or humanity either.

It's almost hard to be that ignorant. Yet it seems epidemic. That's what makes the people pulling their strings so dangerous. Every generation seems to have its Lenin, Pol Pot, Castro, or Chavez.

Who's the monster behind Antifa?

Farnsworth M Muldoon

These people are ignorant hysterics

More like histrionics, but it is a fine distinction, though the ignorance cannot be denied as demonstrated by the fact, as has been repeatedly pointed out, that if the present administration really was fascist, racist, sexist, insert boilerplate leftist claptraphereist, they would all now be laboring in the beet fields in the Montana gulags.

“There’s a misconception on campus that we seek to invite provocateurs. It’s not true,” said senior Naweed Tahmas, of the Berkeley College Republicans, the student group that invited Shapiro.

Little know fact - his real name is Beauregard Robert E. Jefferson Davis Lee, he just goes by Naweed to make it look like there is a non-white Republican.

For many protesters, the specifics of what the opposition says is not the point.

I think it has gotten to be, judging by the people we have seen, basically a club for those who were too weird to have been in clubs or had any kind of social life in high school.

David

if the present administration really was fascist… they would all now be laboring in the beet fields in the Montana gulags.

Heh. I very much doubt that realism or a sense of proportion are assets in such circles.

As we’ve seen many times, this isn’t about politics so much as status and psychodrama. It’s about role-play, self-flattery and power. And so there’s no way to please the competitively indignant, who must forever be aggrieved, short of total and ongoing deference. Endless prostration and self-abasement, bending the knee to each new whim, however risible and erratic.

Attempting to appease such people, in the hope that they can be satisfied and made reasonable, is a futile endeavour and absurdly naïve.

MC

I want to challenge this nonsense, but I'm at a loss how to.

I find that "fuck you" is a good starting point.

Squires

They dream of a society where the rat cage is strapped to everyone's face, and they get to tell us how many fingers they are holding up.

Dhimmitude comes to mind.

Daniel Ream

Attempting to appease such people, in the hope that they can be satisfied and made reasonable, is a futile endeavour and absurdly naïve.

No, it's worse than that. Appeasing these people teaches them that what they're doing works, and so they're going to keep doing it.

David

Appeasing these people teaches them that what they’re doing works, and so they’re going to keep doing it.

Well, yes. One might reasonably infer that indulging opportunist tantrums and outright thuggery is the Clown Quarter’s core function and loftiest ambition, and certainly its most titillating.

David

If anyone has trouble with comments not appearing, email me and I’ll take a broom to the spam filter.

Pogonip

Take the train to the spam filter--it's cheaper and you get there about as quick.

David

I see what you did there.

Hopp Singg

In the Howard Zinn version of things, David, we hear about you from the spam filter's point of view.

You come off pretty well, actually.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Appeasing these people teaches them that what they’re doing works, and so they’re going to keep doing it.

Related, President of Lipscomb College grovels to students "offended" by a centerpiece featuring cotton.

Of course Lipscomb College* is in Nashville, and cotton is a Tennessee crop, and it is getting to be cotton harvest time, so it was a seasonal thing, but hey, anything to throw a fit.

(*Lipscomb College is not affiliated with noted blues singer Mance Lipscomb whose father as an ex-slave and was raised in Texas cotton country and knew from cotton picking)

David

President of Lipscomb College grovels to students “offended” by a centerpiece featuring cotton.

The students were also angered by the home-cooked meal they were served.

Today’s word is gratitude.

Also, fuckers.

Pogonip

This nonsense must not inconvenience rich, powerful adults at all; if it did, the tear gas, dogs, and fire hoses would have already been deployed. Maybe it's the rentier class's version of The Kids Letting Off A Little Steam?

Pogonip

"...we SEEN cotton as the centerpiece..."?

What's this kid doing in college?

David

The students were also angered by the home-cooked meal they were served.

I wonder. Given that these churlish little shits evidently have a taste for identitarian leverage, and once they’ve become accustomed to their power games being indulged, will they ever grow out of them? Or will they spend years being chippy and obnoxious, seething with petty resentment? As if their vanities and spitefulness should be flattered on demand.

Pogonip

They're the children of the ruling class. Of course they feel their vanities and spitefulness should be flattered on demand. 'Twas ever thus. This generation has simply found a particularly inane way to do that. And unless human nature changes bigly, no, they won't grow out of it, though they may switch to more traditional methods of bullying the peasantry.

The joker in the U.S. deck is that the peasantry, while certainly outgunned by their betters, is still sufficiently well armed to stage a pretty fair insurrection. I hope I'm dead before that happens, as it'll make life very unpleasant for everyone.

Pogonip

Hello, Magnesium Person! I took my first pill yesterday and I did fall asleep sometime after oh-dark-thirty; I don't know whether this is coincidence, placebo effect, or magnesium, but it's encouraging enough to keep trying.

(A while back I read an interesting article to the effect that a placebo can still work even if the patient KNOWS it's a placebo!)

Spiny Norman

It’s as if wildly disparate people and opinions were being liquidised into some kind of mental slurry.

This brings to mind Blair's Law:

"the ongoing process by which the world's multiple idiocies are becoming one giant, useless force."

Farnsworth M. Muldoon

The students at Lipscomb apparently also had to stand to eat because that is unheard of at an informal gathering of large numbers of people.

Fortunately there was none of this sort of thing around or a psychiatric mass casualty situation might have ensued.

Large Cotton Bale…one that plays DIXIE! This is an authentic bale of cotton in miniature – grown and “baled” in Mississippi. This measures @ 7” x 4 ½” x 3 ½” and would make a great bookend or shelf display. Price: $20.00

Pogonip

Oh, I wish I was in the land of cotton
Where microaggressions are not forgotten...

Spiny Norman

Who's the monster behind Antifa?

Well...

sipseystreetirregulars.blogspot.com

Also, this.

R. Sherman

The students at Lipscomb obviously have no clue about the history of picking cotton. The poorer classes of people of all races in the cotton states all resorted to doing it to make ends meet. My very pasty grandmother and her siblings all carried nine foot sacks dragging on the ground behind them in the early '20s filling them up with cotton buds. Because they were children, they were only paid about a third of what the adults made because they couldn't carry as much and couldn't work as fast. At the end of the row, they'd dump the sacks onto a burlap sheet which then would be tied up to make the bale shown above.

pst314

"but I’m horrified by the degraded idea that speech is a form of violence."

Leftists have been telling me for decades that speech is violence, so the current wave of leftist thuggery to silence dissent does not surprise me.

champ

What's this kid doing in college?

Hey, don't oppress him with your cis, white, patriarchal grammar...

The Phantom

David said: "The reference points are so confused, so unmoored from reality, it’s hard to know to where to start."

By now I think we can safely start from the notion that these Antifa people and campus "radicals" generaly are essentially mercenaries in the pay of a foreign power. When you accept that they're in it for money, everything else comes into clear focus.

Squires

Well, that $5,000 stereo isn't going to pay for itself.

WTP

It's almost hard to be that ignorant

Yes. It takes years and years, decades even, of education to make people this ignorant. And they managed to find some poor schmucks to pay for it. Suckers all around.

R. Sherman

What strikes me about the young man questioning Shapiro about abortion is how shallow his (young interlocutor's) thinking is. It's obvious he only a litany of talking points, but had never taken the time to actually ponder the philosophical or practical application of those points. Also interesting (and typical of your average collegiate leftist) was the shifting goal posts mid-argument. The young man was civil certainly, but moving from "sentience" to "societal burden" arguments is yet another example of the Left's refusal to engage in good faith. And, note well, the young man's refusal to concede the points well-made by Shapiro. He simply sits down. One wonders whether he learned anything.

R. Sherman

Meanwhile at Georgia Tech, a tale of a student described by his mother as, "very, very bright."

Pogonip

We've had little to no care for the mentally ill in the U.S. since the late '60's. Even though a few asylums still exist, in some states it's virtually impossible to commit anyone. That's why tragedies like this are so frequent here.

Hal

Meanwhile on line . . . .

---Couldn't resist the straight line there. . .

. . . a centerpiece featuring cotton.

'k, fine, have an entire field of cotton. Quite highly recommended, all three parts.

Wh00ps

One wonders whether he learned anything.

Give him a chance, he's at least attempting to engage in civil discourse rather than standing outside REEEEEEing. There is hope for some of them.

David

What strikes me about the young man questioning Shapiro about abortion is how shallow his (young interlocutor’s) thinking is

Well, baby steps. The student did at least thank Shapiro. And I suppose this is why Shapiro devotes most of his allocated time to the Q&A session, and why students who disagree with him are invited to speak first. It’s telling, I think, just how often the students who seem confident in their assumptions, and in the rightness of their feelings, also appear to have difficulty even phrasing a question, despite having days to prepare one. As if questioning their own assumptions is a novel experience and not much practised.

There’s also a tendency, as illustrated by the second student to speak, to beg the question, or to assert as self-evident and unassailable something that’s either untrue or by no means clearly true, or just sweeping and nebulous – “societal discouragement” was one of the terms used, as if it were some rhetorical and logical full stop, as if no actual evidence or specific example need be offered for the purposes of testing. What’s funny is how often these claims of “systemic” or “structural” oppression jar with everyday experience – even the experience of the students making such claims.

Still, it’s certainly an improvement on some of Shapiro’s other attempts to debate ideas on campus.

I’ve shared this video before, filmed last year at Cal State, where leftist students physically prevented anyone entering the venue and assaulted several would-be attendees. The video, which I think is quite symbolic, shows a Shapiro supporter trying to start a civil conversation with one of the protestors, who claims that discussion itself – and particularly, any questioning of campus identity politics - is “violence” against black people. Note how, after mouthing his slogans, the protestor pointedly turns his back on the person he’s supposedly debating, so as to show his virtue in not listening to anyone who might show him to be wrong. Or indeed an idiot.

It’s the new intelligentsia, as developed by the left.

[ Edited. ]

Daniel Ream

a tale of a student described by his mother as, "very, very bright."

I have some sympathy for the parents here. Their son was clearly suffering from severe mental health issues and I have no doubt that any parent is going to be distraught and searching for answers after their child apparently commits suicide-by-cop.

That said, not stepping in and getting your child therapy when "[...] born male, [Scout] preferred 'they' and 'them' gender pronouns and identified as bisexual, non-binary and intersex" means there's some responsibility to go around here.

I have no idea how rigorous an engineering school Georgia Tech is, but given that Scout was a 4th year engineering student who planned on going to grad school while heading one of the more politically activist clubs on campus, I'd be looking at his grades to see if he hadn't perhaps recently found out his activism was interfering with his aspirations.

WTP

Actually, GT was one of the top engineering schools in the country. Considered best in the South when I applied but didn't get in back in the late 70's. The best engineers that I have personlly known were Tech grads and never met a bad one. I have had suspicions lately that standards have slipped, but I think this is true across the all universities. Cultural degeneration has consequences. Trying to point that out 20 years ago was not socially acceptable and could cause "educated" people to question such a person's grasp of reality. Now an entire generation or two has been steeped in leftist idiocy. Good luck reversing it now.

David

Goodness me. Here’s a thing.

Vlogger Nuance Bro interviews some of the gathered thinkers protesting the talk by Ben Shapiro. There’s an Empathy Tent and everything. Oh, and several students who announce, proudly, that they’re “resisting ignorance,” seconds before admitting that they know little, almost nothing, about the man whose presence they’re protesting against.

Here’s part two.

Jen

several students who announce, proudly, that they’re “resisting ignorance,” seconds before admitting that they know little, almost nothing, about the man whose presence they’re protesting against.

Berkeley only takes the best.

David

Berkeley only takes the best.

I have to keep reminding myself that these people are supposedly our cognitive elite, attending a supposedly prestigious institution of higher learning. And yet, based on their obliviousness, it’s doubtful they could find their own arses in the dark.

WTP

Berkeley only takes the best.

Certainly. The best at taking input and regurgitating that input back out at a later date. This is what education has mostly been about for quite some time. Using thinking and reasoning and especially physical interaction with the real world to test if what it is you think you know is actually something you really know just wastes teacher's time. Foolishness is what it is. You're supposed to sit in a lecture hall of several hundred people, listen to what the old guy at the front says, and write it down in your notebook. Then a couple weeks later you take what was written in your notebook, cram it back into your head (short term/long term memory, makes no difference), and spill it back out on another piece of paper. If you do that right, after four, five, six, seven years they give you another piece of paper that you can then use to refute any challenge to what you have to say. Thus we have the rules of Rock, Paper, Scissors, Lizard, Spock.

Nikw211

these people are supposedly our cognitive elite, attending a supposedly prestigious institution of higher learning

I can't help wondering whether it's precisely an awareness of the very same point that leads, ironically, at least some of those students into a far less rigorous questioning (if any at all) of the arguments presented to them.

A point made quite succinctly - and somewhat acerbically - here.

Of course, when questioning certain orthodoxy may lead not only to poor grades from the tutor, but also being made a pariah of by one's peers, the path of least resistance becomes clear.

David

A point made quite succinctly - and somewhat acerbically – here.

Heh. The smug student doesn’t even seem to register that his attempt at a gotcha moment – itself a logical error - is backfiring terribly. Shapiro even warns him, but Mr Self-Satisfied just ploughs on, unsteadily, repeating the same blunder, three times, still looking pleased with himself.

Again, impervious.

It’s a plausible shorthand for the wider phenomenon. The left-leaning students in Shapiro’s videos obviously know what kind of political noises they’re expected to make, and make loudly, and happily comply, but so many of them seem genuinely unable to formulate a rational argument. Just as the protestors in the Nuance Bro videos know that they’re supposed to be denouncing Shapiro as a “fascist” and all-round monster, and happily comply, but they don’t even feel obliged to know anything he’s said or written. Anything at all.

Hopp Singg

Pogonip,

We've had little to no care for the mentally ill in the U.S. since the late '60's. Even though a few asylums still exist, in some states it's virtually impossible to commit anyone. That's why tragedies like this are so frequent here.

A question for which I have no definitive answer of my own: Given a psychology/psychiatric/legal/medical system as we have at present ... have the teachers confused you, little 10 year old? Have some hormones and a surgical brochure ... how would we avoid a complete soviet-style politicization of mental illness were we to return to the old system? It ran on trust.

Have we, even inadvertently, picked the better of two onerous possibilities?

Squires

Hatefacts strike again:
http://legalinsurrection.com/2017/09/third-world-quarterly-publishes-the-case-for-colonialism-leading-to-censorship-demands/

"People claim to be frightened and unsafe"

Of course.

David
If you can’t handle disagreement, you’re making your life harder, and you’re making your life worse, and you’re making the country worse.

From Shapiro’s talk at Berkeley.

Y. Knott

And so there’s no way to please the competitively indignant, who must forever be aggrieved, short of total and ongoing deference.

- Yet, there are ways to address them; ridicule and starvation work wonders.

R. Sherman

Have we, even inadvertently, picked the better of two onerous possibilities?

The problem is, even under the "old" system, caregivers relied upon the government, i.e. its court system, to determine whether someone was a danger to himself or others to the extent that he warranted involuntary commitment, usually in a state institution. You are correct, that such a system relied on trust in caregivers, i.e. parents or physicians, to not overreach and courts to confine themselves to true mental illness. Still, the state was a player in the process and anytime that situation exists, there is a risk that the system will be perverted for political ends. Those in power always have an interest in punishing and/or eliminating "wrong think," and playing with the definition of "mental illness" is an easy way to accomplish that.

Hal

The best at taking input and regurgitating that input back out at a later date. . . . Using thinking and reasoning and especially physical interaction with the real world to test if what it is you think you know is actually something you really know just wastes teacher's time.

I'm reminded of an experience of my own that's only tangential in circumstance: Years ago I recurringly encountered someone who at best was and is acknowledged as a rather cretinous and malevolent psychopath. A repeated insistence made by the idiot was that all that one ever needs to learn of tactics comes from the game of chess---with playing chess being something the idiot didn't even do himself. A bit after I first ran across the idiot, I watched him encounter the game of Go.

After awhile he actually started to sort out that Go involves open ended learning, assessing ambiguity, having balance, working with entire battlefield scale strategy, instead of merely fencing in a closet with toothpicks.

He then absolutely doubled down on his demands that chess be declared preeminent, possibly with the idea that he could be considered to have a clue just by extension.

---And noting doubling down and that ilk, over time I did also find out his approach to anything else involving the tactics of strategy and chance. At no point did I ever hear anything of the skills involved in blackjack or, especially, poker. Instead his emphatic preferences were penny and nickel maximum slot machines, and craps.

Hal

Hatefacts strike again:

As noted before, David Cannadine's book on the operational realities of the British Empire---and anywhere else of the sort---: Ornamentalism.

[+]

Instalanche!

David

Instalanche!

We need more coasters.

Spiny Norman

We need more coasters.

On can never have enough coasters.

The always insightful Richard Fernandez:

If the Left now think they can determine the limits of free speech they are more trapped than empowered, captives of their own stare decisis. They are on a treadmill sometimes called a "national conversation" from which they cannot get off. Often when the Left talks about having a national conversation they mean the thoughts that occur to them and no one else. Then having adjudicated their own internal reflections they author what they regard as binding opinion on themselves and all the rest.

Imprisoned by their own imperatives they arrive at policy positions -- such as limits on free speech -- which they regard as "settled" even though hundreds of millions may not even know what they are talking about. This insidious process of begging the question is typical of totalitarian propaganda which made abundant use of expressions like "undeniably", "unquestionably" or as "everyone knows" or their more modern equivalents like as "all decent people agree ...", "the science is settled" or "this is not who we are" to assume what must otherwise be proved. But it nevertheless compels obedience like a herd driving itself along.

This has the effect of positing a consensus which in fact may not exist. The inevitable outcome of a "national conversation" is conflict declared upon a population that may never have heard of the casus belli before. But it does more than that. In many cases it also creates its own anti-universe. The paradox Ben Shapiro represents is that he as an entity should not exist but inexplicably does. Yet he exists because he must. Many of most of the monstrous figures that make progressives physically sick have their origin stories in the framing of the narrative itself.

One of the most unsettling effects of the Left's inward journeys is how it can instantly redefine everyone else. A population, for example, can go to uneventful sleep and awaken the next day to find the papers proclaiming they've been afflicted with cisnormativity or some other disorder, in a process not unlike how Kafka's Gregor Samsa became a giant cockroach. Overnight there are suddenly 71 genders.

They've constructed an ideological prison from which there is no escape. I've seen many of the same self-imposed shackles in actress Leah Remini's rather shocking exposé of her years in Scientology on the US cable channel A&E.


(Sorry for the over-long quote, but there's too much good stuff there to pull out just a snippet. Although I've quoted the meat of it, as Insty says, read the whole thing.)

WTP

They've constructed an ideological prison from which there is no escape. I've seen many of the same self-imposed shackles...

And yet it is they who have been driving the culture, law, media, education, etc. for the last few decades. Exactly who is in this ideological prison?

Tim Newman

The left-leaning students in Shapiro’s videos obviously know what kind of political noises they’re expected to make, and make loudly, and happily comply, but so many of them seem genuinely unable to formulate a rational argument.

I noticed that about my polyamorous, feminist pal Angela. She used to take a position and do the equivalent of reading the headline, but wasn't able to take the argument to any depth. She'd rote-learned the mantra from her mates, but was unable to support any of it. To her credit, I was able to win her round on a few minor issues.

David

She’d rote-learned the mantra from her mates, but was unable to support any of it.

To a large and grimly comical extent, it’s about posturing and conformism - which attitudes to display in order to win the approval of other idiots. Who to denounce, loudly and ostentatiously, is obviously an important signal; though, as illustrated in the videos above, there’s apparently no obligation to know why. Which I suppose saves a lot of time.

But to those of us who are less needy, and whose social lives are less theatrical, it does seem a little odd to spend an entire evening, maybe several evenings, loudly and publicly badmouthing someone you know nothing at all about, and while utterly unconcerned by whether or not the badmouthing is deserved or perverse.

Adam

I believe applicants to Berkeley have to take the Miller Analogies Test, and score below the 50th %ile. Those who score above may be admitted provisionally but must pass "Critical Race Theory" to assure the University that all sense of irony hsd been extinguished.

Col. Milquetoast

I can tell you when I realized we're all doomed : 1997. I was visiting a friend at her university and I was invited to, what I was told, a group of the smartest people in the entire university including the professors. After a while someone declared there has never been cannibalism anywhere. Cannibalism is a lie to dehumanize and otherize people. I pointed out a Chippewas tribe that would ceremonially eat the flesh of their enemy, the Paupauan cannibals with the prion disease, the Maori, the Donner Party, and the Raft of the Medusa. They insisted. I suggested calling the university library and asking them to check (librarians love that). They refused and resorted to name calling. Eventually, they admitted that the Donner Party was cannibalism but at the same time insisted that there has never been cannibalism anywhere. (fyi, referencing the cannibalism of the Medusa was considered racist against the French who suffer enough from Americans mocking them). When leaving 2 people came up to me and mentioned how surreal the conversation had been and that they would have mentioned it at the time but they didn't want to be called racist. After a long silence my friend said "that was soooo embarrassing" and I said "yeah, they're supposed to be the smartest people in the entire university?!" and she stopped dead and pointed out that I had been the problem. So, we walked to the library and with the librarians' help convinced her that reality is still there.

For some it isn't about logic or consistency or a strict ideology or even a religious like devotion instead it is all about identifying the ideas that are fashionable trends and which are the ideas not to be caught dead in and conforming to it no matter what. I know a girl who went from peace, love and harmony pacifism even opposed to self defense to "sure, let's punch nazis" in an almost overnight transformation.

Geoffrey

In 1807 the British Empire ended slavery throughout it's domain.

The United States 13th Ammendment was ratified in 1865, almost 60 years later.

If America was still a part of the Empire in 1807, then abolition would have been 'imposed' on us. A colonial demand would have made the lives of wealthy white people worse, and colored people better.

Colonialism has done many bad things. But in light of the British Slave Trade Act of 1807, it would be foolish to claim that it had no positive effects for people who lived under it's yoke. I haven't read this persons paper, nor do I know much about the subject in general, but I don't find it hard to believe that the British Empire did some measurable good to it's colonies.

D

A major part of the disconnect between the largely female (or feminized) Leftist Liberals and the largely masculine conservatives is not so much ideology but the differences between the way men and women communicate. Of course, this is only my observation and opinion, so it does not rise to the level of unquestioned fact....and that is part of the problem too.

Men communicate with words and they give some care to which words are arranged, and in which order. Every word has a meaning and all the words strung together become a message, which is largely intended for other men. Yes, men speak to other men about men-stuff.

Women communicate with feelings, or more actually, with tone and sense. The actual words used are not nearly as important as the tone of their performance. It does not matter much WHAT you say....it only matters how you say it. This is particularly true in the English language, which is a spoken language. You could actually say the same English words a dozen different ways, changing the emphasis and tone, and mean a dozen different things.

But don't just take my word for it. (No pun intended.) You can perform a relatively inexpensive experiment yourself the next time you are having a discussion with a woman, even one who knows you very well. Stop the discussion and ask them to repeat what you said (word for word) a few minutes ago. They usually cannot because they did not listen to the actual words that you said....they only focused on HOW you said it, and your tone and your attitude. They seldom retain those carefully crafted messages verbatim, they only know how it made them feel at the time. That is why they are more likely to get into an argument with you about something you never said....because they know better what you meant.

Darleen

Not parody

I have to say I experienced bystander-embarrassment anxiety watching that.

Darleen

D

I hope I've not grown older, but wiser and really paid attention in order to communicate clearly with both men and women.

(I credit listening to a lot of Dennis Prager's talks explaining men's nature so women can understand in this, too)

I find that a lot of people of both sexes, when you think they are listening to you speak, are busy in their mind formulating their next argument against you.

sH2

Today’s word is gratitude.

"Related"

https://twitter.com/CollinRugg/status/909861874409205760

WTP

They refused and resorted to name calling. Eventually, they admitted that the Donner Party was cannibalism but at the same time insisted that there has never been cannibalism anywhere. (fyi, referencing the cannibalism of the Medusa was considered racist against the French who suffer enough from Americans mocking them). When leaving 2 people came up to me and mentioned how surreal the conversation had been and that they would have mentioned it at the time but they didn't want to be called racist. After a long silence my friend said "that was soooo embarrassing" and I said "yeah, they're supposed to be the smartest people in the entire university?!" and she stopped dead and pointed out that I had been the problem.

Heh...been there once or twice. Cute how you were the one with the self-awareness problem.

Daniel Ream

Cute how you were the one with the self-awareness problem.

Virtue-signalling one's membership in the tribe outweighs all other considerations.

I was turfed out of a cooking group on Facebook (of all places) for pointing out that no matter how tasty homemade almond essence might be, making things out of peach pits was extremely risky and the "lab test results" the original poster had allegedly contracted to prove her recipe safe were dangerously wrong.

tolkein

In 1807 the British Empire ended slavery throughout it's domain.

The effort the British put into the abolition of the slave trade (including squadrons of the Royal Navy off the coast of West Africa) and abolition of slavery in the 19th century onwards is something, as a Brit, I'm proud of. But it was only the trade that was abolished. It was not until 1833 that the Abolition of Slavery Act was passed. Perhaps, if the 13 Colonies had not won independence abolition could have come earlier and race relations in the US would not have been as poisonous. But the cost to the North of buying out the South might have been much harder and the importance of slavery to the South much greater than it was to the UK. And, without prompting, the Northern states had abolished slavery after independence, so credit is due there.

Richard Cranium

And, without prompting, the Northern states had abolished slavery after independence, so credit is due there.

Well, it's easier to do so when your economy doesn't require slave labor and you don't have a lot of them.

Upon reflection, it's obvious that the "anchor baby" idea wasn't in effect until sometime after the American Civil War. I should look that up.

Richard Cranium

Ah. The 14th Amendment makes the difference.

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