David Thompson
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March 10, 2018

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JuliaM

"Most of the traits and behaviours that are likely found under the rubric of “toxic masculinity” are precisely those that most women find attractive in an ideal mate."

But, but....wait!

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/mar/08/women-are-having-different-fantasies-romantic-fiction-in-the-age-of-trump

"“I woke up on 9 November and I was like, ‘I can’t write another one of these rich entitled impenetrable alphas. I just can’t,” says the New York Times bestselling author. “It was the story of that horrible impenetrable alpha evolving through love to be a fully formed human, which is a thing we do a lot in romance. And I just couldn’t see a way in my head that he would ultimately not be a Trump voter.”"

David

“And I just couldn’t see a way in my head that he would ultimately not be a Trump voter.”

Truly, the burdens of the artist are heavy, and their suffering infinite.

Thomas O

I find the conservative/liberal empathy imbalance fascinating. I've noticed it throughout my polite discussions with friends; those who are big Corbyn fans take massive exception to any critisicm, while those on the right of me have no concern with my tilting at their sacred cows.

It's become especially pronounced since I've started admitting to people that I voted for Brexit. Most right and centrist remainers have been understanding and interested in learning why. Those remainers of the left have gotten angry, called me a racist and unfriended me. I'm aware that I'm not alone in this experience.

Min

this short clip of Jordan Peterson discussing women’s preferences in pornography.

LOL

David

I’m aware that I’m not alone in this experience.

Democratic voters are almost three times as likely to have “blocked, unfriended, or stopped following someone on social media” after Donald Trump’s victory, according to a study… The survey shows considerable splits along gender lines as well. Women were “twice as likely as men to report removing people from their online social circle because of the political views they expressed online,” 18 percent to 9 percent, according to the study conducted by Daniel Cox and Robert P. Jones… Meanwhile, 5 percent of those polled said they will alter plans to spend less time with select members of their family because of their political views. This, too, showed a partisan divide: 10 percent of Democrats said they planned to avoid certain family members, and 2 percent of Republicans said they would do likewise.

Joe Concha, here.

David

LOL

In case you’re tempted.

Hector Drummond, Vile Novelist

"In my undergraduate honours thesis I analysed the significance of Herman Melville’s allusions to the Book of Job in Moby Dick. I wanted to do more of that: studying and understanding the great works of literature. Instead I was asked to understand how “The Althusserian ‘ideological interpellation’ designates the retroactive illusion of ‘always-already;"

Sure, Althusser is evil garbage. But that doesn't mean that analysing the significance of Herman Melville’s allusions to the Book of Job in Moby Dick for three years in grad school is time well spent.

David

I’m aware that I’m not alone in this experience.

I think I’ve mentioned before a visit to a friend’s place, years ago, where a handful of other people had gathered – mostly people I didn’t know or didn’t know well. After maybe five minutes, one of the strangers suddenly, quite randomly, began a lengthy and impassioned political tirade, unrelated to anything else being said. I forget the particulars, but the general thrust of the young woman’s outburst was that conservative voters are bad people, driven solely and always by selfishness, wickedness, etc.

What struck me at the time – apart from the incongruity and randomness of the rant – was the evident assumption that the rest of us – including me, a person she didn’t know - would be in wholehearted agreement, or at least defer to the general sentiment. The woman’s tone and demeanour made it clear than any demurral or factual correction would likely result in a heated exchange. She was there to signal her piety; we were there to bear witness to her magnificence. And so, not wanting to further derail an otherwise pleasant gathering, I said nothing.

Maybe it’s a temperament thing, but when among strangers, it wouldn’t occur to me to launch into an unprompted political tirade of eye-watering length and questionable coherence, and in which I called half the population next of kin to demons. It would seem… rude.

David

that doesn’t mean that analysing the significance of Herman Melville’s allusions to the Book of Job in Moby Dick for three years in grad school is time well spent.

It does strike me as an expensive indulgence. Not terribly practical, shall we say.

Y. Knott

Asked to think the way a liberal thinks, conservatives answered moral questions just as the liberal would answer them, but liberal students were unable to do the reverse…

- Having no idea myself, I ponder - are liberals more prone to group-think than conservatives, and hence easier to type-cast ( - and satirise? - )

Or is it simply explained by one of Charles Krauthammer's quotes: Conservatives think liberals are stupid. Liberals think conservatives are evil."

A penny for your 2c' worth (as often as I can get-away with it)...

David

A penny for your 2c’ worth

Regarding the asymmetry, I think Thomas Sowell gets to the nub of it.

Jonathan

He is a tall prince and a neurosurgeon. He is a risk-taker who wrestles alligators and subdues them on his six-pack abs, and yet is sensitive enough to be tamed by the love of a good woman.

Male feminists seen in action on an earlier thread:

No wonder feminists seem so pi**ed off at men. They don't know any.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

It was the story of that horrible impenetrable alpha evolving through love to be a fully formed human...

Right, no conceit there, nosireebob.

Crossing the Line (Harlequin NASCAR)

The only home Garrett knows is behind the wheel of a race car, and now he's on track to win a coveted championship. Falling for a hardworking mother of three isn't part of his freewheeling bachelor plans, but how's he supposed to resist the tempting package Grace is offering—a home, a family, the whole nine yards?...[knee deep in hot babes, three screaming sprogs - choices, choices...]

Mass Market Paperback
from £0.01

OK, I laughed.

Jonathan

They say a picture paints a thousand words:

Jonathan

Women hit hardest:

Jonathan

More 'peaceful' leftists:

Armed communist group calls for “offensive attacks” and “revolutionary martyrdom”

“We have to initiate offensive attacks, as part of a larger defensive stage in our preparatory sub-stage of war. We have to hit. We have to hit hard. Women have to hit. Women have to hit hard. It is through severe punishment – but a revolutionary kind which we call revolutionary violence – that the enemy is subdued, even momentarily, or completely neutralized.”

Cue Media outrage about the dangers of communism....crickets.

ComputerLabRat

In case you’re tempted.

Hahahaha! A bodice-ripper! Although in this one, it's his own he is tearing open.

No romance novels for this woman - I prefer Tolkien or Heinlein.

Romance is one genre that SJW types haven't managed to ruin yet, like they have SF and fantasy. Interesting point he's making.

Jonathan

This is true wokeness:


via Battle Beagle

Adam

“The Althusserian ‘ideological interpellation’ designates the retroactive illusion of ‘always-already;’ the reverse of the ideological recognition is the misrecognition of the performative dimension.”

I could not have said it better myself!

[+]

'A student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania was recently barred from attending a religious studies class that he needs in order to graduate after he questioned his instructor's claims regarding the "reality of white male privilege."'

https://www.campusreform.org/?ID=10622

PiperPaul

"Corbyn fans (and leftists in general) take massive exception to any critisicm"

I suspect this is because their arguments are, as our host would say, not load bearing.

David

questioned his instructor’s claims regarding the “reality of white male privilege.”

I’d have thought that the people with grading leverage and other institutional backup, and who presume to be the unilateral arbiters of “privilege” – resulting in campaigns of gender and racial shaming aimed at other people’s children and without parents’ knowledge or consent – might also have some “privilege” worthy of scrutiny.

But maybe that’s just me.

Darleen

Bret Weinstein on chickens and their residency.

David

Bret Weinstein on chickens and their residency.

“Freedom from intimidation and abusive acts,” says the pretentious, neutered wretch whose policies and personal behaviour indulged and encouraged narcissistic morons to the point where they lay siege to his office and refused to let him go to the toilet without their supervision.

The man, and the institution he supposedly runs, are unfit for purpose.

Darleen

More from Julia's link on Romance Genre in the Age of Trump [cue the screaming horses]

But women’s fantasies may be changing in the current political climate anyway; MacLean says the blue-collar hero has become more popular (“Mechanics are really big”) while Boatman says career women have begun appearing more often in manuscripts. “The fashions of romance have always changed over the years – they change with the fantasies that women and men want to have,” she adds. “And maybe in the current climate, women are having different fantasies.”
I never was a huge reader of this genre, mostly books that my friends shoved at me and said OMG you gotta read THIS! but the idea of blue-collar hero isn't new at all.

1976 ... my sister and I went to the movies more than once to watch Sam Elliot in Lifeguard
Another favorite of the era was a made-for-tv romance movie Hardhat & Legs ... professional woman & blue-collar man

These just off the top of my head, but template of "roguish guy of less social status than uptight woman, wins her over" has long standing in the genre.

Funny how history for some always begins with their own birth.

Duke Magoo

After years of trying to bridge the gaps .... find common ground .... I have reached the point where I avoid any and all leftists. I will not befriend a leftist, I won't talk or debate them as that is futile, for they are mentally and emotionally impaired. Perhaps not all of them, but I am not interested in weeding them out.

They have shown themselves to be violent for very little reason such as differing opinion or a Trump T-shirt.

They know not what they do, but I will not forgive them.

The civil war is coming. The time for talking to these zombies is over. They stopped talking to us a couple of decades ago and now scream obscenities at us at every opportunity. Facebook, Twitter, and Google-(youtube) regularly lock out accounts for speaking our minds. Many big left-leaning firms won't hire or promote conservatives. We have been under attack (especially white conservative men & boys) for a long time and didn't quite 'get it'. Well, now we do.

I am not a naive, God-fearing conservative. I know what we are dealing with and it is dangerous to our freedoms ... in the extreme. There are growing numbers who feel as I do. This shit we are living right now in American and Canada had got to be ended. A civil society cannot last with this level of animosity between its people. The EU is already gonzo so there's no point trying to save them. Use them as an example to avoid at all costs.

David

Sam Elliot in Lifeguard

[ Googles “Sam Elliot in Lifeguard.” ]

[ Tries to muffle sounds of laughter. ]

Darleen

Hey, what is not to love here? (the movie theater made a fortune off me & my sister in popcorn alone)

David

[ More muffled laughter. ]

[ Sound of wine being poured. ]

Ed

Parker Stevenson on the left. Kirstie Allie thanked him during her acceptance speech during the Emmy Awards for "giving me the big one". And yes,she meant exactly what it sounded like.

Look on his face was ..."Yep,you're welcome".

Pogonip

Romance writers may have to start their own publishing houses. As the Guardian article shows, the publishing field is infested with feminists, and if the books become too feminist-ized, women will quit reading them. Although I suppose the writers could turn to gay romances, all they’d have to do is change the sex of the heroine.

I think if I were to write a novel, I’d bypass the publishing industry entirely and just put it out there on Amazon. There’s a risk that you’d miss little mistakes, but it’s offset by not having your story forced into a stupid ideological box.

Once upon a time there was a blogger, (in)famous for his unbending policy of No Refunds, Credit Note Only. Then one day a handsome fellow wielding a kitchen blowtorch turned up, and...

The above illustrates the real problem with leftists: they’re boring. You and I could read the story of these two gentlemen and enjoy them as people. The leftists would turn them into stereotypes and have them oppressed by heteropatriarchy and blah blah blah.

Bill_Peschel

"Romance writers may have to start their own publishing houses."

Oh, they have, Pogonip. It's called "indie publishing," and romance writers make up the biggest percentage.

Romance writers are like rappers: They're in it for the money. They love to tell the stories, but they love the chedder, too. Most of them are hip to the latest marketing trends, and they work the websites, the social media, and form alliances to provide marketing support for each other.

David

Having now Googled “Sam Elliot in Lifeguard,” “Hardhat & Legs” and various romance novel covers featuring billowy dresses and shirtless pirates, my browser history is looking more damning than usual.

Darleen

romance novel covers featuring billowy dresses and shirtless pirates

And then there is the whole soap-opera industry! Much mocked but well-watched.

pst314

"See also this short clip of Jordan Peterson discussing women’s preferences in pornography."

From the video: "five categories of most desirable male entity used most broadly in female pornography:...vampire, werewolf, billionaire, surgeon, and pirate"

I wonder if Dr. Peterson has heard of K/S (Kirk/Spock> porn, which is written by and for women. Would it make him laugh, wince, or both?

Steve E

"...my browser history is looking more damning than usual."

Wait until you see the ads that start showing up in your browser.

Captain Nemo

The Age of Travesties: https://www.city-journal.org/html/age-travesties-15750.html

Leading universities have turned themselves into hybrids of Mr. Rogers’ neighborhood and Mao’s Red Guards. They have become madrassas of identity politics, given over to dogmatism, indoctrination, the coddling of grievance, and the encouragement and manipulation of neurotic youthful insecurities for the purpose of consolidating political power. The effects of travesties being committed on American campuses, where the mind of the hard Left is embedded in faculties, administrations, and boards of overseers, will be felt for generations. The damage may be irreparable.

Darleen

K/S (Kirk/Spock> porn,

Ah, slash fanfic. Kirk/Spock, Solo/Kuryakin, Harry/Draco ... yep, mostly female demographic, but within that demographic majority non-heterosexual.

Fred the Fourth

Various conservative figures have noted a plausible explanation for the liberal / conservative difference in understanding each other.
Conservatives are constantly exposed to, and must operate in the context of, a culture saturated in liberal ideas.
Liberals are not similarly situated.

David

Conservatives are constantly exposed to, and must operate in the context of, a culture saturated in liberal ideas.

They have no politics.

Steve E

...filthy ads for things ending in "uck" like this and this. And other ads for things ending in "eer" like this.

Spiny Norman

feel free to share your own links and snippets, on any subject, in the comments.

Okay, you said "any subject"...

https://twitter.com/Mel_lific/status/972151221405605888

(from an @iowahawkblog retweet, so blame him. No, really!)

Phil B

“The Althusserian ‘ideological interpellation’ designates the retroactive illusion of ‘always-already;’ the reverse of the ideological recognition is the misrecognition of the performative dimension.”

I'm reading that in English but it is somehow being translated into Swahili in my brain.

Can a native Swahili speaker please translate it for me? Pretty please?

David

Okay, you said “any subject”...

The word Burroughsian came to mind.

filthy ads

We may have to sedate Darleen.

Pogonip

Spiny Norman: “Hakuna bullshit.”

Steve E

Burroughsian

Fleshy Dan?

Pogonip

If the pirate’s shirt has been pirated, he’s perfectly sensible to put on the billowy dress. You can get a nasty sunburn out on the open sea.

champ

Its come to this:

https://pjmedia.com/trending/offend-diversity-lose-job/

pst314

perfectly sensible to put on a billowy dress

https://youtu.be/V36cnqFuVAA?t=49

R. Sherman

Regarding the Haidt study and David's subsequent link to Bidisha and Jeff Goldstein's comments thereto, the current education industrial complex no longer celebrates examination of core principals with a desire to test arguments with the tools of logic, reason and evidence. Rather, there are now only received "Blessed Truths" which endlessly must be recapitulated, lest one be accused of heresy. Stated differently, we've devolved to a sort of Neo-Scholasticism. Is it any wonder that Leftists cannot accurately state classical liberal positions? Not only have they not been exposed to them, they've been purged of any ability to understand them when they're heard. They've been conditioned to view such ideas as witchcraft. Knowledge now is not examination; it is repetition without comprehension.

Hal

. . . various romance novel covers featuring billowy dresses and shirtless pirates, my browser history is looking more damning than usual. .

And then there is Dislocating My Left Shoulder, and other book covers . . .

Geoffrey

Another possible cause (and one that might be more timeless) for the disparity between how the Left and Right sees each other is the Idealism vs. Pragmatism divide. The Left leans more towards Idealism while the Right is more Pragmatic.

To the Pragmatist, an Idealist is a well-intentioned fool. Their good intentions are worn on their sleaves, and so it's fairly safe to presume that most of those idealists really do believe what they say, even if they have no idea how to implement it. While it's clear that at least some supposed idealists are just manipulating people, it's also clear that they'd have no-one to manipulate if their ideas didn't sound so lovely.

To the Idealist, a Pragmatist is someone willing to accept a lesser evil, when there are ways to avoid any evil. Now, this is a fine idea in and of itself, but it's also VERY easy to see the Pragmatist as someone willing to sacrifice other people towards his own end. As pragmatism is not terribly attractive to people who are going to be the losers in the arrangement, the pragmatists will indeed be made up primarily of those who make little to none of the pragmatic sacrifices.

As such, the pragmatist sees most of his enemies as fools, while the idealist sees most of his enemies as uncaring or selfish. We generally are more forgiving to foolishness than selfishness, and so the idealists will be more inclined against his opponents than the pragmatist.

I suspect there is a strong relationship between traditionalists and pragmatists, as well as progressives and idealists, throughout history, regardless of the ideologies of the time. The traditionalist sees that "Society is fine enough as it is, let's not gamble the good we have now on some crazy new ideas", while the progressives see how the world could be better, because they can see ideals not being realized.

Perhaps someone could tell me what Britain thought of the Americas during the revolution, and vice-versa? The Founding Fathers so loved by the American Right today would have been the progressive idealists of their time. This is not a criticism, as the ideals have long since proven to work, and so have rightfully become the domain of traditionalists. But did the British Empire see the Americans as a bunch of idealistic fools with a government designed to fall into anarchy? And did the American revolutionaries see the British as evil oppressors refusing freedom to people who could safely handle it?

I'm curious what an educated student of history could confirm or deny in this hypothesis. Regardless of whether it's historically consistent, it seems pretty clear to me that it's true at least right now, and partially responsible for the way people see their political opponents today.

R. Sherman

If I may, let me rise in defense of the study of literature, something which occupied the better part of a decade of my life. I concede that it's difficult to perceive a utilitarian purpose for such things and further that the current state of literature studies is a far cry from when I was a grad student in the early '80s. Still, there's something to be said for diving deeply into the canon in an attempt to understand the author, his/her work, and the time it was written. Such study and contemplation allows us to have a better clue about Humanity as a whole. Without it, Huck Finn becomes nothing more than a travelogue about a float trip. Those insights need to be preserved.

That said, there's no question that the current state of affairs is abysmal, primarily because literature and philosophy departments have been taken over by the SJW menace and have turned the study of literature and human thought into nothing more than Leftist Struggle Sessions where the New Progressive Orthodoxy must be disseminated constantly and all contrary views suppressed. This all started happening when it became fashionable to divorce a work of literature from its context, i.e. specifics regarding the author, world affairs at the time of its writing, and human society at the time of its writing, in order to make a work reflect the biases and political leanings of whomever happened to be reading it. At the same time came the explosion of "Angry Studies" Departments and/or "Oppressed Group Du Jour Literature Studies" classes which argued that "dead white males" had no insight into the human condition generally, and certainly none for whatever allegedly marginalized group was in the audience.

In sum, it's not the study of literature which is the problem. It's what's been done to it.

R. Sherman

And did the American revolutionaries see the British as evil oppressors refusing freedom to people who could safely handle it?

Geoffrey, I cannot speak for the British view of the colonies, but at the outset, the colonists simply wanted to have the same rights as "all free Englishmen." The objection was that colonists were being treated as second class by a parliament away in London and exploited accordingly.

Believe me, dear Sir: there is not in the British empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But, by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament propose; and in this, I think I speak the sentiments of America.— Thomas Jefferson, November 29, 1775

Geoffrey

While I agree there is value in the study of literature, I'm not sure it warrants college-level studies, unless you wish to become an author yourself. It is certainly worth some of your time, in the way studying history also tells you something about the human condition and the nature of societies. It can also serve as good mental exercise. Figuring out what Melville's favorite books are by the allusions he puts into his own works can really get you thinking and opening up new mental pathways, but the conclusions you derive are still not terribly useful.

That being said, we do still need good authors, good historians, and good exercise coaches, so that doesn't mean I fully discredit these college courses. I'm just not sure they're good for more than that. Though, if you don't claim significantly more than that, then I think we have no real disagreement.

Squires

A civil society cannot last with this level of animosity between its people.

That is the means to the ends.

Daniel Ream

Romance writers are like rappers: They're in it for the money. They love to tell the stories, but they love the chedder, too.

A family friend used to work for Harlequin (a Canadian company, btw) writing the back cover blurbs. There are apparently a large number of men writing romance novels under pseudonyms because it's steady, fairly easy work. Harlequin keeps this under wraps because women won't buy romance novels written by a woman.

Daniel Ream

...written by a man. Ducking autocorrect.

R. Sherman

That being said, we do still need good authors, good historians, and good exercise coaches, so that doesn't mean I fully discredit these college courses. I'm just not sure they're good for more than that. Though, if you don't claim significantly more than that, then I think we have no real disagreement.

There's no question that a deeper understanding of the humanities is, dare I say, necessary for a life well-lived, IMHO. And for that, society needs a limited number of literature scholars. The problem since the late '60s is that there is a surfeit of people chasing those limited billets. This leads to the lunacy our host has noted occasionally in the "publish or perish" atmosphere of modern academe. That, combined with the take-over of departments by the "Angry Studies" crowd gets us to where we are today.

(As I noted, my literature studies came at the beginning of all this and fortunately, I could see the writing on the wall. In my case, I noted that departments no longer were interested in males with an expertise in 16th-17th century German poetry, the Renaissance and/or the Reformation. Instead, the craze was for female German writers, which meant there were suddenly hundreds of specialists in post 1945 German fiction, but virtually none who knew anything about the literary influence of the Thirty Years War. Thus, shifted gears into a different career. Nonetheless, I don't view my literature studies as a waste of time.)

Sam Duncan

“Funny how history for some always begins with their own birth.”

This evening, I caught an advert (you know, one of the ones the BBC doesn't have) for the BBC's 6 Music radio station, in which its presenters wax lyrical about their love for “all kinds” of music. Now, I'm not as up to speed on the Beeb as when I was on its Listeners' Panel a few years back, but I'd be pretty surprised if 6 Music has ever, in its entire existence, played anything older than the Corporation itself. In fact, if it weren't for the faint chance that some eclectic soul has dug up some blues records from the '30s, I'd lay good money on nothing before 1950.

“And yes,she meant exactly what it sounded like.”

Crikey. Lucky bloke. I had quite the crush on Ms. Allie back in her Cheers days.

I mean, she was no Lynda Carter, but who is?

“I think if I were to write a novel, I’d bypass the publishing industry entirely and just put it out there on Amazon. There’s a risk that you’d miss little mistakes, but it’s offset by not having your story forced into a stupid ideological box.”

There's probably a gap in the market for freelance editors catering to self-publishers. (Unless it's already been filled. What do I know?)

Pogonip

“Fern Michaels” is a man who’s been in the romance business for 50 years or so. Fern says his wife helps him with the sex scenes so they don’t sound too masculine.

Pogonip

The semi-annual clock fustercluck (fusterclock?) is tonight. Does Great Britain have Daylight Savings Time? The last time I was in Canada, they did.

Indiana held out for decades, but finally caved because a lot of residents of South Bend, Indiana commute to work in Chicago, Illinois.

Other Chicagoland trivia: LaPorte, Indiana, about 11/2 hours from Chicago, has notoriously bad weather (even by U.S. standards) caused by storms sweeping down from Lake Michigan and combining with atmospheric inversions that are caused by I-forget-what; look up “LaPorte weather anomaly” for a good explanation of it all. Also, Dr. Scholl, founder of the Dr. Scholl foot empire, was from LaPorte, and probably hotfooted (ha!) it out of there to someplace with better weather as soon as he got rich.

My aunt lives in LaPorte, but she’s 91 and rarely goes out when so the foul weather
doesn’t inconvenience her as much as when she was raising 5 kids there. Which reminds me.

POGONIP PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT: Please do NOT try to chew up and swallow large tough raw broccoli stems. My cousin (of the LaPorte Pogonips) choked to death doing that. He lived alone and the position in which he was found suggested he had tried the self-Heimlich maneuver and failed. So boil those broccoli stems into submission before you eat them.

RNB

"Ah, slash fanfic. Kirk/Spock, Solo/Kuryakin, Harry/Draco ... yep, mostly female demographic, but within that demographic majority non-heterosexual." Another member of a group of Trekfen I hung out with (Argh!) forty years ago presented a draft of a K/S 'slash' story to a gay gentleman of her acquaintance, asking for his informed opinion of the 'mechanics' thereof. A week later he handed it back to her with the comment, "Who the hell wrote this? A teenage lesbian?" She denied it on a technicality: The authors were TWO teenage lesbians.

Pogonip

...who then grew up to work in some bar with thousand-year-old pickled “eggs”...

David Bishop

On and on and on the SJWs gibber, drone and drivel:

Via Samizdata:
https://www.samizdata.net/2018/03/samizdata-quote-of-the-day-1018/

this from The American Conservative: "Hating Whitey at Stanford"
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/hating-whitey-at-stanford/

(I hope I haven't missed someone else posting these links.)

JuliaM

"Maybe it’s as basic as saying that people mustn’t have meetings in private any more."

Ha ha ha! Let’s all laugh at hopelessly out of touch conservative politician Mike Pence, and his squaresville beliefs, right?


Oh.

https://t.co/76jc8FJvLN

JuliaM

I have offended the spam filter *sad face*

David

Does Great Britain have Daylight Savings Time?

We’ve had this conversation before, I think.


I have offended the spam filter *sad face*

What the buggery have you done to upset it this time? I’ve had to make offerings.

David

There’s no question that a deeper understanding of the humanities is, dare I say, necessary for a life well-lived, IMHO. And for that, society needs a limited number of literature scholars.

Maybe it’s just a case of personal aptitude and finding some subjects much easier than others at school, but unlike, say, chemistry, I always found literature lessons easy and the content on offer insufficient to justify years of university study and an enormous bill. In that, while teachers of chemistry and physics seemed to have a reservoir of knowledge and expertise to tap – stuff I couldn’t just intuit or figure out autonomously, at least pre-internet - teachers of English literature seemed to have a fairly limited bag of tricks. Tricks that you could pick up quickly and repeat as necessary with little supervision. There are only so many ways to parse, say, Shakespeare before you venture into baseless conjecture, and then absurdity.

And from a lecturer’s point of view, there’s a career pressure to be unobvious, as if one had a vast reservoir of hidden knowledge. This obligation to be unobvious can lead some to make claims that are original only insofar as more realistic people would not be inclined to take them seriously, and which may explain how quickly and irretrievably the humanities have been degraded and in large part rendered ludicrous.

As Thomas Sowell put it,

If you’ve mastered the writings of William Shakespeare and convey that to the next generation, who have obviously not mastered it, you’re performing a valuable service. But, that’s not going to advance your academic career. You’ve got to come out with some new theory of Shakespeare. You’ve got to go through and show how there is gender bias or the secret gay message somewhere coded in Shakespeare. You’ve just got to come up with something.

And so things have to be problematised and politicised, and subject to the “woke” fashions of the day, often in laughable ways, and we get professional educators – professors of Medieval Literature - denouncing whitey and theorising about the preputial connotations of aluminium cans.

a different james

There are only so many ways to parse, say, Shakespeare before you venture into baseless conjecture, and then absurdity.

It all depends, does it not, on how rigorous the course is? Up to recently (20? 30 years ago?) an Arts degree usually required reading and absorbing much information and writing many essays.

The content might not have been as immediately useful as, say, engineering or accounting but it should have shaped a mind to absorb and distill information and think rigorously.

David

It all depends, does it not, on how rigorous the course is? Up to recently (20? 30 years ago?) an Arts degree usually required reading and absorbing much information and writing many essays.

Again, this may just be a function of my own aptitudes, and blind spots, and maybe there are students of engineering or chemistry who find parsing literature a deep and mysterious business. But pondering literature always struck me as something any reasonably intelligent person could do with minimal steering and supervision. I’m not questioning the potential rewards of mulling literature, so much as the need to spend a fortune, and several years, on someone telling you how to do it.

Karen M

“toxic masculinity”

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/290881/

Pogonip

If someone asked about DST before, it was probably me. Sorry!

If someone asked about DST before, it was probably me. Sorry!

David
Places for scientific journalism, such as the Guardian, or Wired, or Scientific American, they won’t go near anything that contradicts very strong leftwing narratives, such as stereotype accuracy, or the biology of sex differences, or intelligence research. So there are these areas of the behavioural sciences that don’t find a platform. And I wanted to create that platform.

Jordan Peterson talks with Claire Lehmann, founder and editor of Quillette.

Turk Turkleton

Amanda Marcotte, sort of the American version of Laurie Penny, intuits that "classical liberal" is just another term for "alt-right", counters a valid criticism with snark about "gaslighting".

Also, she says, if you're not in favor of heckling, you're not in favor of free speech after all. Checkmate, alt-right wolves in classical-liberal sheep's clothing!

David

Amanda Marcotte, sort of the American version of Laurie Penny

Ms Marcotte is an imperviously stupid woman. And quite vile.

Turk Turkleton

As Thomas Sowell put it

Where is that from? I'm still trying to accumulate all of his books, but haven't seen that passage yet. It reminds me of a point Damon Linker once made:

Professors are trained as graduate students to become scholars — and scholarship in our time is defined as an effort to make progress in knowledge. The meaning of progress in the hard sciences is fairly obvious. But what does it mean to make progress in our knowledge of, say, English literature? One possibility is to find obscure, previously neglected authors and make a case for their importance. (This could be described as making progress in knowledge by way of expanding the canon.)

Another possibility is to bring new questions to bear on old, classic texts. But where will those new questions come from if not the concerns of the present? This is how professors end up publishing reams of studies (and teaching gobs of courses) on such topics as "Class in Shakespeare," "Race in Shakespeare," "Gender in Shakespeare," "Transgender in Shakespeare," "Intersectionality in Shakespeare," and so forth. To tease out those themes in texts that have been read, studied, and debated for centuries certainly constitutes progress in knowledge, since those who publish the research have said something genuinely new about something old and familiar.

One reason why conservative scholars tend not to conduct this kind of research is that they're not especially interested in questions of class, race, gender, and related issues. But that's not because they'd prefer to achieve progress in knowledge by bringing a different, more politically conservative set of questions to bear on classic texts. ("Supply-Side Economics in Shakespeare"? "Hawkish Foreign Policy in Shakespeare"?) Rather, conservatives are usually drawn to the study of the humanities with a very different goal in mind — nothing less than pursuit of the timeless human wisdom they believe can be found in the great books of the past. What kind of research and teaching does this motivation produce? Studies of, and classes in, such topics as "Love in Shakespeare," "Friendship in Shakespeare," "Justice in Shakespeare," "Death in Shakespeare," and "God in Shakespeare."

David

Where is that from?

It’s from this interview.

Darleen

We may have to sedate Darleen.

oh my... it's gotten a bit warm in here ...

definition of a man

David

[ Opens windows and flaps newspaper in attempt to disperse dense, choking clouds of oestrogen. ]

Darleen

Amanda Marcotte, sort of the American version of Laurie Penny Ah Mandy Mandy Mandy ...

I don't whether it is a good or bad thing that she has blocked me from Twitter for years.

She was scribbling for the now defunct blog, Pandagon when I first started blogging. How I came to here attention, I don't know but she wrote a snark-filled 'review' of my views even attacking the little stories of my first grandsons (twins) who were toddlers at the time. She especially hated when I related that my husband had surprised me on my birthday with a box of chocolates in which he had put a necklace with my birthstone pendant.

I commented asking her why my quite conventional views and experiences were such an object of ire to her.

She remarked that I was a problem, that I was happy being married and that marked me as someone who didn't have an authentic voice because I "let men own my vagina"

I snarked back, "and you let them rent yours"

I was forever marked as being a female misogynist and generally as an Un.Person by St. Mandy of the Vagina ever since.

In 14+ years her writing has never changed ... she is still a profoundly angry and unhappy person.

Turk Turkleton

It's hard to pick a favorite example of Marcotte's boundless stupidity, but I was particularly impressed when she traced the dislike of cats back to sexism:

Well, I think I have a theory, and yes, it’s sexism. Deeply sublimated sexism, but sexism all the same. While all sorts of people have pets of both types, cats are associated with not just women, but single, childless women. A lot of what people are doing when they insist that you cat doesn’t really love you and you must be fooling yourself is a kind of mansplaining: Silly cat ladies, who think that their cats love them! It fits into this larger narrative about how women are dumb and needy and cling to cats, unlike sure-footed, bright men who pick a pet they know loves them: dogs.

It's like she heard the old saying about having a hammer and seeing everything as a nail, and took it as an inspirational slogan. She's like an idiot savant of apophenia and pareidolia, capable of perceiving sinister patterns in the most random and innocuous phenomena.

R. Sherman

In 14+ years her writing has never changed ... she is still a profoundly angry and unhappy person.

I wonder how much of that is also due to her being out of the limelight. Early on, she was somewhat of a darling on the Left, but after crawling from the trainwreck of the Edwards campaign, her star faded quite a bit. I'm sure she still has her acolytes, but she doesn't seem to have the exposure she had years ago.

Captain Nemo

She remarked that I... didn't have an authentic voice because I "let men own my vagina"

I snarked back, "and you let them rent yours".

That's brutal. And brilliantly funny. To the point where I've just had someone come upstairs and ask me what I'm laughing at.

Darleen

R. Sherman

I'm sure that may have something to do with it ... but she has never changed her style or come up with any original thoughts since. She clings to the rad-feminist Leftism as if she could find the right combo of magic phrases and all fame would come to her.

Heh...she's the Ray Manzarek of feminist bloggers, forever recycling her past connection to fame.

Daniel Ream

But, that’s not going to advance your academic career. You’ve got to come out with some new theory of Shakespeare. [...] You've got to come up with something.

Interesting note: a few years ago the Globe Theatre was rebuilt and there was a brief push for staging Shakespeare as historically consistent as possible - men playing the female roles, etc. One of the things they wanted to do was present the play in the original Elizabethan English, so they scrounged some period dictionaries and began rehearsing the period pronunciation.

It turns out that every Shakespeare play is absolutely packed with puns, mostly filthy, based on similarities of pronunciation that only occur in the original Elizabethan dialect. Apparently no one had ever noticed this before and it set off a flurry of new research.

pst314

a few years ago the Globe Theatre was rebuilt and there was a brief push for staging Shakespeare as historically consistent as possible

http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/
and:
http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/shop/category/cds-dvds/148

Sweet.

Pogonip

“Imperviously stupid” is right. Amanda and another feminist, whose name I forget, were hired to work on John Edwards’s presidential campaign. One of them thought it would be a good idea to insult the Virgin Mary, the other then doubled down, and both of them were baffled when they were fired. Now, it’s not unheard of to think Mary was the town slut who pulled history’s biggest con job—but how stupid do you have to be to say so when your boss is running for president? And how stupid do you have to be to be surprised when your statement doesn’t go over well?

Pogonip

I am not sure how cats, nice little critters who mind their own business, became associated with feminism. I’m in the cat-lady age group so I know several, and none of them are particularly feminist. One, in fact, is a dumb-blonde type who’s always hip deep in men. She has between 8 and 10 cats—the number fluctuates as they get run over and she replaces them. The two characteristics that I observe in cat ladies are that they like to collect things, and they have higher-than-normal maternal instincts (certainly not a feminist trait) or a normal level of maternal instincts that were never fulfilled—they remained childless for some reason.

The association between collecting and cats is probably because it’s a lot easier to hoard cats than dogs—cats don’t make much noise if they’re fixed so you can collect many more cats than dogs before the neighbors finally get local authorities to do something.

David

Why so much art is bad.

Geezer

So boil those broccoli stems into submission before you eat them.

You might try this, instead:

  1. Skin those broccoli stems the same way you skin cucumbers (potato peeler?)
  2. Slice those broccoli stems longitudinally into quarters or eighths the same way you slice cucumbers.
  3. Salt those broccoli stems to taste the same way you salt cucumbers.
  4. Those broccoli stems no more need boiling than cucumbers do.
David

Or,

5. Throw those broccoli stems in the trash, where they belong.

What?

Daniel Ream

I am not sure how cats, nice little critters who mind their own business, became associated with feminism.

There's an interesting theory that toxoplasma gondii plays a role. Not with feminism, but with self-destructive behaviour generally.

Then again, one could argue feminism is self-destructive behaviour.

ComputerLabRat

Why so much art is bad.

'Cause it's trying waaay too hard to challenge and disrupt worldviews? Yeah, I can see that.

Although what these wastes of oxygen fail to realize is they aren't challenging anything any more, just reaffirming their own little worldview bubbles and preening for their peers.

Or something. Postmodernism is not my strong suit.

David

they aren’t challenging anything any more, just reaffirming their own little worldview bubbles and preening for their peers.

Pretty much.

If an artist or would-be artist is preoccupied with “disrupting” my “worldview” – if that’s the goal, the measure of their ambition – then there’s a very good chance that they aren’t doing their job, and may not even understand what their job is supposed to be. Making something beautiful is a much humbler ambition, compared to all this worldview disrupting, and generally much more difficult.

Geezer

Throw those broccoli stems in the trash, where they belong.

Is that what you do with cucumbers?

Pogonip

Nobody here likes cucumbers, so they’re not here to be thrown into the trash. I only buy cucumbers if I’m lucky enough to be making the salad for a potluck (easiest role you can have next to “I’ll bring the paper plates!”)

If you get stuck with Bread and Rolls, get sick the day of the party. Nobody eats the Bread and Rolls anyway , and you save a lot of money.

David

Is that what you do with cucumbers?

At its best, the edible bit of broccoli is barely a foodstuff. Disintegrated in a chicken stew, perhaps. And cucumber’s typical role is as a moistening agent in sandwiches.

Pogonip

Why has that Tyson guy been anointed the real-life Ludwig von Drake, expert on everything? Just once I’d like to see him quoted as saying, “Gee, I’m sorry, that’s not my field, I don’t know anything about that.”

Geezer

Oh, dear. Do David and Pogonip also throw away the chicken's heart and liver?

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