David Thompson
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April 20, 2018

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Ten

This thing here

Is the most beautiful thing in the world.

Black Ball

Who knew that Merkel was bringing in a million Ghandis?
https://museumsvictoria.com.au/immigrationmuseum/whats-on/mahatma-gandhi-an-immigrant/

Captain Nemo

Sculpted glass.

Very nice. And on the subject of glass artworks, these by the Danish artist Steffen Dam are equally beautiful. What's more, there's no post-modern artibollocks in evidence:

http://www.steffendam.dk/index.php?page=works

Black Ball

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/inclusive-workplaces-for-better-organisational-outcomes-tickets-44429423602

Do you have Shona Barrett on your books Mr Thompson? She does enjoy cocktails you know. So perfectly able to demand organisational change for inclusvity yo.

WTP

Chillin Harlem. Click for the interesting pic. Scroll down into the comments, for raging flame war about comma usage.

Sam Duncan

“You know, for kids.”

“Not suited as a toy ! Nicht als Spielzeug geeignet !” WTF?

“Edinburgh, 1920”

Captioned with the modesty for which Edinbuggers are renowned, I see.

Sam Duncan

“You know, for kids.”

“Not suited as a toy ! Nicht als Spielzeug geeignet !” WTF?

“Edinburgh, 1920”

Captioned with the modesty for which Edinbuggers are renowned, I see.

Sam Duncan

How did that happen, then?

PiperPaul

I got kicked off a Compuserve chat room once in the early 90s for using the term, 'wanker'. It's nice that the internet is so much cleaner now when it comes to bad word usage.

PiperPaul

I found an alternative to the blogging thong!


º|º

pst314

PiperPaul: That looks like something that an American black extremist came up with after he got out of the "kill whitey" business...except that his version was pants, not underclothing. Really. :-)

Fred the Fourth

You've been doing it wrong forever.
https://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/

R. Sherman

@PiperPaul: Evidence.

Fred the Fourth

Hmm.My link to the shoelaces site was there, then not. Is it my first time in the Trap?

Ray

Can a robot assemble an Ikea chair?

Yes, if a human opens the box, places the pieces just so, and you skip the glue.

So, no.

Cunning plan: I tawt I taw a ... Never mind.

Darleen

David R. Click -- Sept. 2, 1928 - April 17, 2018

Fort Ord, CA, 1950

David

Morning, all.

Is the most beautiful thing in the world.

It does have aesthetic properties, which is something that sets it apart from many contemporary offerings.

Do you have Shona Barrett on your books Mr Thompson?

I was distracted by Ms Sonia Lindsay, who, in the space of a year, has apparently become a “leading expert on culture and change,” while also filling in as a primary school relief teacher. So she’s either some kind of anthropological genius or a two-bit “diversity” hustler. I wonder which.

I got kicked off a Compuserve chat room once in the early 90s for using the term, ‘wanker’. It’s nice that the internet is so much cleaner now when it comes to bad word usage.

Ah, the days when an email address was (a) exciting, and (b) a string of digits and commas.

Alice

This thing here is one of these.

That's lovely.

Darleen

Ok...what crap is photobucket pulling? I've never had a problem posting my own flippin' pics... ok, just the link...

http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff182/darleenclick/blog%20images/1950-dave004fb.jpg

David

Ok...what crap is photobucket pulling?

I go to sleep for a few hours and Darleen gets drunk and trashes the place.

David

Actually, there’s some Typepad maintenance ongoing at the moment, so any bumps and glitches may be due to that.

Hal

Chillin Harlem. Click for the interesting pic. Scroll down into the comments, for raging flame war about comma usage.

Sounds like fun, especially when the Oxford commantery comes in . . . Only all I see ranges from rent control to cars of the era . . . It's the Harlem picture you're finding the comma war below?

Jen

Ah, the days when an email address was (a) exciting, and (b) a string of digits and commas.

Did you wear a white jumpsuit with a high collar? :-)

gunker

Who knew that Merkel was bringing in a million Ghandis?

Ghandi wasn't exactly complimentary about the indigenous population he found in South Africa.

David

Did you wear a white jumpsuit with a high collar? :-)

Mercifully, no. Though about the same time, mid-Nineties, the Other Half and I were tremendously excited by the fact that you could spend a mere 45 minutes waiting for a film trailer to download*, before staring in wonder as a tiny moving image, about the size of a credit card, flickered into life on your chunky monitor.

*Provided no-one used the fax machine.

David

Batvan.

Ted S., Catskill Mtns., NY, USA

Photobucket have been doing that since July.

They want $300 (or is it $400) a year to let you embed images.

Mags

a jumpsuit that flashes and vibrates whenever asteroids approach the Earth.

When S.M.O.D. arrives I don't want to be seen wearing that thing.

David

When S.M.O.D. arrives I don’t want to be seen wearing that thing.

It’s not the most flattering garment. And amid the cataclysmic judderings and tidal waves of lava, you would want to look your best.

Ten

Is the most beautiful thing in the world.

It does have aesthetic properties, which is something that sets it apart from many contemporary offerings.

True, yet western cultural classicism risks rejecting too much of the art world that doesn't hew to a certain of its acceptable intellectual structure. It tends to predicate itself on its membership: The Dutch realists were among the greatest artists ... despite being the photographers of their time. The Greek or Roman classisists were likewise, provided there was some spiritual or preferably religious import. Norman Rockwell, now there was an artist because traditional Americana, and so on. But you can keep those hippie Impressionists. And like that.

This Thing Here is living, organic, primal, surreal, original, and has elements of abstract and natural beauty to awe (which it did me). How they did it is unknown, probably technically highly astute, and bleeding edge. Computer-driven, it gives no reference to the mechanical or programmed at all. The whole thing instead speaks to some ancient genesis - original earth or the voice on the water - which grants it a creative sense that to me at least transcends the structuralism that restrains art more than it should.

That comes off like one of them damn fool progressive liberals I realize, yet that's part of the point. Predictability never cuts it, classical or otherwise, and we've abhorred the great bulk of the modernist movement for decades. The same is true in music - there's nothing worse than novel and abstract for its own sake, but surely there's nothing better than paring down an original piece to its elements. Consider Bach, who only embellished and filigreed themes as simply elegant as they were elemental. (Or good jazz; the art of the missing notes.) I'll take a Bach over the official voices like Handel ten to one.

It is possible to create new genres not for the aimless point of doing so - as this blog uniquely documents - but to knock the artistic element out of the park. This Thing Here does that, and without a classic architectural spire or a romantic 18th century figure or a member of nobility in it...

pst314

R. Sherman: Thanks. Yes, Eldridge Cleaver was the person I was thinking of.
Note that the linked article calls him an "underrated" figure of the "black power movement". I don't see how that can be, since (1) he was well known and frequently in the news back in the sixties, and (2) he had full cred as an authentic black power revolutionary, having served time in prison for drug dealing, rape and attempted murder.

David
If you happen to work for the New York Times and have a book out, your book is more likely to stay on the [bestsellers] list longer and have a higher ranking than books not written by New York Times employees… If you happen to have written a conservative-political-leaning book, you’re more likely to be ranked lower and drop off the list faster than those books with a more liberal political slant.

Here.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

David R. Click -- Sept. 2, 1928 - April 17, 2018

Darleen - if I am reading this right, my condolences, and hand salute to SFC Click.

MC

a jumpsuit that flashes and vibrates whenever asteroids approach the Earth.

I think the vibration function could be situated much more, erm... internally. Then, when the sweet meteor of death arrives, the wearer will race to a truly cataclysmic orgasm, or orgasmic cataclysm. Either way, when the world ends, you won't mind a bit.

MC

I've never got round to reading much of Quillette, but Claire Lehmann is an absolute hottie. All eyes, cheekbones and lips. Plus clever and - as far as I can tell - on the side of the angels. Yummy.

Right, I'd better go out and find a young woman to rub myself against...

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Meanwhile, in the world or art, Male artists wonder whether they can work with the female form, while the world questions what their intentions were in the first place.(Illustrations possibly NSFW)

...And the question of the moment has become: Is it still an artistically justifiable pursuit for a man to paint a naked woman?...Brooklyn-based painter Kurt Kauper found out how tricky painting the female nude is earlier this year...The website Artsy quickly sized up the problem he might encounter in an article called “The Perils of a Man Painting Naked Women in 2018.” The perils soon became real when critic Brienne Walsh reviewed the show for Forbes...To Walsh, Kauper demonstrated a “white male” viewpoint of art history, “full of gaping holes.” [Now there is a poor choice of words] She also ruminated on “how disturbing a shorn vagina [another anatomy class failure there] looks — to me, it implies acquiescence to porn culture, to a patriarchal society that prefers that women not smell, not offend, not grow up beyond little girls.”

Of course. RTWT - there is a quiz at the end where you must guess whether a man or woman painted the picture - trust me, it is easy.

pst314

Is it still an artistically justifiable pursuit for a man to paint a naked woman?

Then we must also question whether lesbians can paint naked women, or gay men paint men, and so on.

Maybe a simpler solution would be to question whether it is justifiable for Progressives to open their big fat mouths. ;-)

Darleen

my condolences, and hand salute to SFC Click.

Thank you, Farnsworth. It's one of my fave pics of my dad -- the man who always made sure there were no monsters under my bed and made sure the closet door was tightly closed.

WTP

Condolences, Darleen. Fort Ord was 7th Division. Do you perchance know what regiment he was in? Did he serve in Korea? The 7th did a lot of fighting in the Korean War. My father served in the 17th Infantry Regiment in WWII and later occupation of Seoul removing the Japanese from policing powers and setting up temporary US police force.

R. Sherman

Darleen, my thoughts are with you and your family. That was a time when men were men. I recall in the 60's, all of my friends' dads, not to mention my own dad and uncles were veterans of either WWII or Korea. On one hand, they were "just" our dads. On the other, they were larger than life, having shared something we never would. Still, they came home, married their wives, loved them, worked hard, raised their kids, wanted something better for them (us) and made sure we achieved it.

Thank God for them.

Darleen

WTP

Dad joined the Army right out of high school 1946 and was 11th Airborne occupation Army in Japan 46-48. He went into the National Guard when he came home and was called up for Korea in 1950. He had his shipping papers but at the last minute they needed instructors so he went to Fort Ord as a DI. I believe it was 1st Field Artillery Battalion - he taught weapons, artillery and military history.

My parents married 4/28/1951.

David

my condolences,

Mine too. Only just noticed the second date above the photo.

Have a large one on the house.

dw

"Readers may find it remarkable that these students expected the other people in the room to applaud and validate them for derailing the event. The students also think the university should refrain from punishing them, because any punishment would contribute to their mental health problems."

http://reason.com/blog/2018/04/20/duke-students-alumni-protest-university

David

The students also think the university should refrain from punishing them, because any punishment would contribute to their mental health problems.

Apparently, they will be “traumatised” by their actions having the customary and foreseeable consequences. Consequences to which they agreed, in writing, on arrival at university.

The word unfit comes to mind.

Pogonip

So sorry, Darleen.

Captain Nemo

My condolences, Darleen. A good life well lived, by the sound of it. Although I didn't know your father, I shall raise a glass of something in his memory.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Here is a steaming hot mess of a "special report" from the New Scientist.

As our special report shows, no one benefits from a patriarchal society.

If no one benefits, than no one is harmed, than "Teh Patriarchy™" is no big deal.

New Scientist - if by Scientist they mean BS artist, OK.

Surreptitious Evil

A large what? Given the bar snacks, the mind boggles.

Condolences.

Pogonip

My parents got married on 8 July 1948. Dad missed his 68th wedding anniversary by one day.

Mags

Meanwhile in Uganda...

http://www.okayafrica.com/ugandas-president-wants-to-ban-oral-sex-museveni-says-the-mouth-is-for-eating/

jabrwok

Then we must also question whether lesbians can paint naked women, or gay men paint men, and so on.

Not really. The objective is to vilify straight, white men. Consistent application of the "principal" would not serve to that end, and so isn't applied. Just asking the question marks one as the Enemy.

On a different note, my condolences also Darleen.

Ted S., Catskill Mtns., NY, USA

Am I a bad person for laughing at this headline?

Chris Ivey

Re:
a jumpsuit that flashes and vibrates whenever asteroids approach the Earth.

Is it just me, or does that millennial reporter from the Verge sound like she's just slightly brain damaged?

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Meanwhile in Uganda...

Apparently the president of Uganda is unfamiliar with English slang...

pst314

Am I a bad person for laughing at this headline?
Possibly. My immediate reaction was, 'in what barbaric place did this occur?'

pst314

David, sorry about the lack of a space between the italicized quote and my comment.

Daniel Ream

Am I a bad person for laughing at this headline?

To be honest, I'm still puzzling over this part:

NDTV reported that China has few regulations for its zoos and wildlife park, and pointed to a June incident where a donkey was dropped into a tiger pit due to unhappy business investors.

Hal

To be honest, I'm still puzzling over this part:

NDTV reported that China has few regulations for its zoos and wildlife park,

Quite. Reading assorted news, one keeps getting an impression of China having plenty of restrictions, but zero regulations.

Fred the Fourth

Darleen,
My dad was a Marine F4U driver (VMF 312) in Korea, along with his brother. Both started early enough to have WWII service records, but were still in training.
Dad passed 3 years ago.
My condolences.

Daniel Ream

a jumpsuit that flashes and vibrates whenever asteroids approach the Earth.

I just got around to watching this, and I'm baffled. For a startup's first prototype, I was expecting something a little more...actually wearable. What they've got there I could knock together out of an off-the-shelf Arduino, Raspberry Pi and a couple of programmable LED strips and a cell phone vibrator off of alibaba, in the same form factor. There's no reason the "puck" needs to be that big, they should be able to minimize it to a flat panel similar to those sound-sensitive LED Equalizer T-shirts.

Tim Newman

Actually, there’s some Typepad maintenance ongoing at the moment, so any bumps and glitches may be due to that.

Be honest, you find the overalls rather fetching.

David

David, sorry about the lack of a space between the italicized quote and my comment.

[ Notes date and time, laminates, files away for later use. ]

Be honest, you find the overalls rather fetching.

Have you tried the, er, savouries?

They’re best downed in one.

Jonathan

Hotep trolls Starbucks:

https://twitter.com/VibeHi/status/985642512206491649

WTP

Am I a bad person for laughing at this headline?

No, you’re a racist because something something something. But that doesn’t make you a bad person. Or did you mean bad like “good”?

David
Britain’s first specialist engineering university will take school-leavers without A-level maths or physics to boost the number of female students.

Because, er, diversity, and maths is hard.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Britain’s first specialist engineering university will take school-leavers without A-level maths or physics...

Elena Rodriguez-Falcon, 46, the university’s provost and chief academic officer [the WTF ?], said that she would welcome students with three arts A levels.

Given what passes for "art" these days, that is even less reassuring.

She said that Britain was the only country to insist that engineering students had maths and physics qualifications.

Except, of course, every other country in the Western world:

Examples of high school classes in the math and science fields needed for engineering are:

Math: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Probability & Statistics, Calculus I, and Calculus II.

Science: Physical Science, Biology, Applied Biology/Chemistry, Advanced Physics and Chemistry.

Note to self: avoid British aircraft in the near future.

R. Sherman

Britain’s first specialist engineering university will take school-leavers without A-level maths or physics...

Admission is one thing. It depends on whether the math sequence at the university level is then dumbed down in order to get a degree. At my son's STEM university, all students are required to take a math test upon admission with the results determining placement in the university math sequence. The university pays no attention to what a student had in high school or high school grades, believing its test is a better indicator of math ability.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

It depends on whether the math sequence at the university level is then dumbed down in order to get a degree.

Short answer - what math ?

Its students will be called “learners” because there will be no lectures, studying or traditional exams and they will not graduate with an honours degree. Nor will they specialise in a particular type of engineering, such as mechanical or electrical. Instead they will work on real projects in groups of five, for nearly a month at a time, and build up a portfolio proving their skills, leaving with a pass or fail in a masters degree.
R. Sherman

Instead they will work on real projects in groups of five, for nearly a month at a time, and build up a portfolio proving their skills, leaving with a pass or fail in a masters degree.

Ah. Clarity.

Query, how the university will justify a "pass" or a "fail" without reference to objective mathematics and/or physics? How will the students understand the critiques without a common reference point? Why do I believe "fail"s will be extraordinarily rare?

David

She doesn’t look the type.

Fred the Fourth

They're not teaching engineers. They're certifying "engineering project managers". The useless kind, whose work product consists of PowerPoint presentations. The kind of PM that competent engineers change employers to avoid.
You can't make a real PM out of a non-engineer, for The same reason you can't make a flight instructor out of a non-pilot.

David

On the various, rather desperate attempts to smear Jordan Peterson as a racist monster.

Sam Duncan

This might only be Jonah Goldberg's weekly newsletter, but it may be the best thing he's written since Liberal Fascism:

Our colleges teach kids that being liberal or left-wing is rebellious, but there’s nothing rebellious about it. Rather, the claims of rebelliousness are the coating that makes the pill of conformity easier to swallow. The examples that demonstrate this are all too familiar — from the Google memo to, well, Kevin Williamson.

There’s still room in our culture to be different, though the irony is that wearing a gray flannel suit today is more rebellious than wearing, well, almost anything. Being an atheist on a college campus isn’t rebellious; it’s one of the most tedious forms of conformity. A real rebel talks out loud in an Ivy League classroom about how Jesus Christ is his or her personal savior. For today’s kids, it’s okay to have weird, eccentric, or oddball ideas, so long as they don’t rub against the grain of what Everyone Is Supposed to Believe. I mean, we live in an age where Satanists don the mantle of rebellion but are quick to clarify they’re not crazy like — you know — those whacky Christians.

I’d have so much more respect for the progressives who control the commanding heights of our culture if they had the courage to admit that they control the commanding heights of the culture and that they’re in the business of imposing orthodoxy.

He also quotes Williamson himself:

If you want to know who actually has the power in our society and who is actually marginalized, ask which ideas get you sponsorships from Google and Pepsi and which get you fired.

I can't tell you how glad I am that mainstream commentators are finally saying this. It's been obvious to me for almost thirty years.

Steve E

Palm Beach County tried the waterless urinal and found it to be a piss poor alternative.

Perhaps the multimedia part might be enough to distract from the rivers of urine encountered by students.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Palm Beach County tried the waterless urinal and found it to be a piss poor alternative.

Why, it is almost as if no one ever knew urine can be very corrosive, and diluting it with the water from a flush reduces the risk.

Perhaps the designers were graduates of no math pass-fail engineering schools.

Meanwhile, back in Palm Beach...

"The technology makes sense," said Lee Kapp, district utilities manager. "It's going in every new school."

"The technology makes sense", said Dr. Ludwig Dürr, designer of the Hindenburg...

WTP

I can't tell you how glad I am that mainstream commentators are finally saying this. It's been obvious to me for almost thirty years.

Ditto. Like being gaslighted by the gaslighted.

jabrwok

A real rebel talks out loud in an Ivy League classroom about how Jesus Christ is his or her personal savior.

My preferred form of rebellion is to use the masculine singular pronoun when referring to a generic individual of unstated sex (and to use "sex" when referring to human beings rather than the linguistic construct "gender").

Hal

Historical competition.

Daniel Ream

"The technology makes sense", said Dr. Ludwig Dürr, designer of the Hindenburg

It's now well-understood the problem with the Hindenburg was the fire-retardant coating on the envelope, which when exposed to high UV over long periods (such as traveling above the clouds) broke down into a highly flammable compound. This is what caught fire and burned. The hydrogen was incidental, and most of it didn't combust.

Hal

Hmmm. . .

Being an atheist on a college campus isn’t rebellious; it’s one of the most tedious forms of conformity. A real rebel talks out loud in an Ivy League classroom about how Jesus Christ is his or her personal savior. For today’s kids, it’s okay to have weird, eccentric, or oddball ideas, so long as they don’t rub against the grain of what Everyone Is Supposed to Believe. I mean, we live in an age where Satanists don the mantle of rebellion but are quick to clarify they’re not crazy like — you know — those whacky Christians.

Ehn, that's a lovely bit of pontificating there, but singing a very pretty song is definitely the only thing going on in that statement.

Lesseee . . . Being an atheist . . . .

Being an atheist is just as much a statement of mere faith as any other statement of mere faith. As a form of mere faith, atheism also has absolutely nothing to do with genuinely personal religious experience and practice. The demonstration that atheism is faith is simple; Demonstrate as fact, and not merely by absence, that there is no god or gods or supernatural forces. When an atheist is thus unable to prove . . .

A real rebel talks out loud in an Ivy League classroom about how Jesus Christ is his or her personal savior.

Ehn? Why bring up chanting about Jesus, except to signal the exact same total conformity with the local flavor of mere right wing? The exact same right wing result is achieved by chanting Mohammad!! Mohammad!! Mohammad!! or by chanting Krishna!! Krishna!! Krishna!! or by chanting Odin!! Odin!! Odin!! because right wing demand of faith is indeed mere right wing demand of faith and thus remains mere right wing demand of quite mere faith.

---Leessee . . . do a quick bit of Googlemancy and Yes, Indeed, even the practicing Christians will instead cite Matthew 6:5-15 as a Christian religious practice.

. . . an age where Satanists don the mantle of rebellion but are quick to clarify they’re not crazy like — you know — those whacky Christians. . . . Except, of course, that Satanists, quite by definition and practice, are those whacky Christians absolutely as much as all the other Christians. Does Satan come out of Shinto or Buddhism, just to grab a couple of handy examples? No, Satan is not found there. References to "demons" do turn up, sort of like large termites or wasps, and they're dealt with in about the same manner. In Judaism, "Satan" is, at most, a stock variety of quite godly angel from heaven with a license to annoy. So again, that statement is merely standard and empty right wing cant as opposed to genuinely conservative religious observation, on several levels.

Sooo . . . if the fellow wants to piss off the left wing---and prolly piss off the right wing as well---with a practice that is openly, clearly, and genuinely conservative as opposed to being merely left wing or merely right wing, he can have a look at a fellow named William Swing, and an actually religious and conservative practice called a Cooperation Circle.

CCs are groups of seven or more individuals representing three or more different faiths or spiritual expressions (including atheists and agnostics).

And

This mission is carried out through local and global initiatives that build the capacity of more than 800 member groups and organizations, called Cooperation Circles, to engage in community action such as conflict resolution and reconciliation, environmental sustainability, education, women’s and youth programs, and advocacy for human rights.

Of course, if being genuinely religious is too much of a cross to bear, there is an easy way out. Remember, in the Americas and Europe, being a Christian on a college campus isn’t rebellious; it’s one of the most tedious forms of conformity.

Hal

Oh, yeah, speaking of being religious, as opposed to merely declaring conformity to the local faith:

I keep reading that the Catholics have been having more and more fun reminding the right wing what religious actually means . . . . . . . . .

Hal

Oh, and for that Financial Times link noting right wing against religious, I'm not an FT subscriber. I just pulled the complete article up out of Google, except that apparently getting the article instead of a subscription demand may be a matter of the whims of your local browser while supplicating the kami of Javascript and Adblock . . . .

Going with this alternative and selecting the first result seems to be a workaround . . .

Hal

And, while trying to get back to assorted studies, got reminded of another learned discussion of modern Christianity.

PiperPaul


lmao rofl

Lisboeta

Could have phrased it more clearly?

"We encourage people and dogs alike to do their business in other places, like a proper restroom or one of our fire hydrants, which are stronger and made out of cast iron.”

pst314

Hal: so you are saying that true Christianity is socialism?

WTP

Hal: so you are saying that true Christianity is socialism?

Ditto. Not a big Jesus guy myself per se, and certainly not one to speak for Him, but I think one would be very hard pressed to find support for government solutions to these problems in anything JC said. Seems to me JC was saying very much the opposite. Also not a big fan of much rightist religious philosophy either but when disasters strike, many of those people are on the front lines in helping. This Narrative of mocking the religious right and picking on their hypocrisy is itself quite hypocritical. And becoming extremely tiresome. Especially when emanating from certain corners, IYKWIM.

pst314

...healing the sick, caring for the poor, feeding the hungry...

Hal, are you unaware that Christians give much more to charity than do atheists and leftists?

Hal

Hal: so you are saying that true Christianity is socialism?

Not my mythos. Either one of 'em.

So, again being reminded of that utter gulf between mere faith and actual religion, when considering that . . . many of those people are on the front lines in helping . . . you could take the question up with Bishop Swing and his people on those front lines and see what responses you get.

. . . are you unaware that Christians give much more to charity than do atheists and leftists?

And also as pointed out, which of whom? Are you asking of the leftist Christians, the rightist Christians, or the religious Christians? Are you asking of the atheists who are just as filled with their atheistic faith as any other right winger, are you defining as atheist anyone who states not being Christian, whom?

You've got far too many overlapping sections in your quite several part Venn diagram there.

pst314

And also as pointed out, which of whom? Are you asking of the leftist Christians, the rightist Christians, or the religious Christians?

"Rightist Christians" are indeed among the Christians who give much more to charity than do atheists and leftists.
It has long been a favored meme on the left that Christians--and especially "rightist" Christians are lacking in charity, but it's not true.

Darleen

re Hal's 'toon

"Go forth & petition Caesar to seize your neighbors' crops and redistribute them." #ThingsJesusNeverSaid

BTW I don't know of any candidate who is against helping the poor - but is it the province of the State to provide or the realm of the individual?

Re: there is a reason why California has only 12% of the national population but 33% of welfare recipients and 1/5 of the nation's homeless.

Addiction to "free stuff" and the resulting entitlement mentality outstrips heroin or opioids by several factors.

Hal

It has long been a favored meme on the left . . .

'k, but what does anyone left wing have to do with this discussion???? While quite true that I, for one, am quite conservative, as opposed to left or right wing, there is no particular political orientation implied when simply noting that political reality consists of the mere right wing, the conservatives, and then the mere left wing---Or the other way 'round, to taste . . .

. . . but it's not true.

What would help with that claim is stating actual numbers and citing a source---you may be perfectly correct, but we have no idea . . .

As noted, you will also need to cite the numbers for the actual religious Christians and their contributions, as contrasting with the rightist Christians.

Darleen

It is counterfeit grace to publicly advocate for charity by offering up your neighbor's paycheck to the Government.

I hold such people in very low regard.

Hal

Re: there is a reason why California has only 12% of the national population but 33% of welfare recipients and 1/5 of the nation's homeless.

Yeah, it's called weather.

And while attempting to stir in scattered numbers, the other reason is that California is physically the third largest state, after Alaska and Texas. Consider Rhode Island, which doesn't have the room.

WTP

you could take the question up with Bishop Swing and his people on those front lines and see what responses you get.

Or you could take it up with me or anyone else who isn’t hostile to the religious right who has actually worked with them to help the poor and struggling. What gives some random California left-wing bishop of the Catholic church absolute knowledge on these matters? Never saw him in the north Georgia mountains. Saw some other kinds of people, though. But hey, his personal experience trumps mine because...something something something.

pst314

'k, but what does anyone left wing have to do with this discussion????

Because it seems that many British conservatives have in recent years assimilated the anti-Christian calumnies of the Left. I was, in fact, quite struck when I realized just how vicious the hatred could be.

What would help with that claim is stating actual numbers and citing a source

There have been studies of charitable giving here in the United States. It would be difficult to cite the various sources that I read years ago, but I'm sure that Google would be your friend here.

pst314

What gives some random California left-wing bishop of the Catholic church absolute knowledge on these matters?

And it is not unheard of for far-left atheists to go to seminary, get a theological degree, and set up shop in a church where they preach Social Justice while ignoring the Bible (except where they can quote it selectively in the service of Marxist economic theory.)

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Wherein Hal loses the plot again...

Yeah, it's called weather.

California does not equal Los Angeles, or the narrow strip of the state that has mild weather most of the year. Obviously you have never been to Ft. Irwin either in January or August. Except for the humidity, Tupelo, Mississippi, has a better climate than most of California.

...the other reason is that California is physically the third largest state, after Alaska and Texas...

I see, that explains why Texas and Alaska are overrun with welfare recipients and homeless, well their size and the various notoriously leftist Texan policies.

Hal

you could take the question up with Bishop Swing and his people on those front lines and see what responses you get.

. . .

What gives some random California left-wing bishop of the Catholic church absolute knowledge on these matters?

Hmmm. You're going to have to explain whom it is you're referring to when you state random California left-wing bishop of the Catholic church.

It the meantime, regarding Bishop Swing, William Edwin Swing is a retired bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States.

---Just in case, for those not familiar with the larger parts of the nine billion sects of Christianity, The Episcopals are considered a variation of the Church Of England, and the Catholics are the fellows based in Rome.

Hal

Wherein Hal loses the plot again...

Siiigggghhhh . . . really, when proclaiming totally random and vague selections from the nearest dictionary or phrase book, actually having a context and citing examples does help y'know.

Have an example: California does not equal Los Angeles,

Darleen's statement was Re: there is a reason why California has . . .

Darleen did not state . . . Los Angeles, or the narrow strip of the state that has mild weather most of the year.

In turn, another example of my remaining quite correct:

...the other reason is that California is physically the third largest state, after Alaska and Texas...

I see, that explains why Texas and Alaska are overrun with welfare recipients and homeless,

. . . where the weather in Alaska, once you get there, rather tends towards zero, be it Fahrenheit or Celsius, where Texas rather tends towards 100 Fahrenheit . . . while sometimes also hitting zeroIsh.

So I remain quite correct in reminding that the majority issue is the weather

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