David Thompson
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August 28, 2018

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David
Another of my distinguished colleagues heard a nurse, who had climbed up the greasy pole to become finance director of her hospital, say, “The future projection of the current fiscal envelope predicts a challenging context.” This makes Emperor Hirohito’s radio announcement after the Americans dropped the atom bombs that developments had taken place that were not necessarily to Japan’s advantage seem brutally frank. It is true that the nurse’s statement was unusually comprehensible—the hospital had exceeded its budget this year and would have to spend less next—but one has to remember that it was a spontaneous spoken remark rather than a written one, and that, with a little polishing, it could be upgraded in writing to complete incomprehensibility.

Theodore Dalrymple on plain speaking and its enemies.

Peter H

Some things never change.

Reminds me of Francis Bacon’s assertion in the 16th Century…that one cause of sedition and mutiny in any polity is “breeding more scholars than preferment can take off.”

Peter H

This post by David Foster at the great Chicago Boys blog also rings true:

"Some thoughts from the great economist Joseph Schumpeter, writing in 1942:

The man who has gone through a college or university easily becomes psychically unemployable in manual occupations without necessarily acquiring employability in, say, professional work. His failure to do so may be due either to lack of natural ability—perfectly compatible with passing academic tests—or to inadequate teaching; and both cases will . . . occur more frequently as ever larger numbers are drafted into higher education and as the required amount of teaching increases irrespective of how many teachers and scholars nature chooses to turn out.

The results of neglecting this and of acting on the theory that schools, colleges and universities are just a matter of money, are too obvious to insist upon. Cases in which among a dozen applicants for a job, all formally qualified, there is not one who can fill it satisfactorily, are known to everyone who has anything to do with appointments . . .

All those who are unemployed or unsatisfactorily employed or unemployable drift into the vocations in which standards are least definite or in which aptitudes and acquirements of a different order count. They swell the host of intellectuals in the strict sense of the term whose numbers hence increase disproportionately. They enter it in a thoroughly discontented frame of mind. Discontent breeds resentment. And it often rationalizes itself into that social criticism which as we have seen before is in any case the intellectual spectator’s typical attitude toward men, classes and institutions especially in a rationalist and utilitarian civilization.

Well, here we have numbers; a well-defined group situation of proletarian hue; and a group interest shaping a group attitude that will much more realistically account for hostility to the capitalist order than could the theory—itself a rationalization in the psychological sense—according to which the intellectual’s righteous indignation about the wrongs of capitalism simply represents the logical inference from outrageous facts. . . . Moreover our theory also accounts for the fact that this hostility increases, instead of diminishing, with every achievement of capitalist evolution."

Too much education really is bad for you!

Captain Nemo
[T]hose on the left regard me as a Judas. And they do so because I don’t fit conveniently into their insatiable and pathological need to stereotype everyone. To them, the very notion that a trans woman – because we are “different” and a “minority group” – could be anything other than a Mao-quoting, Che-Guevara-T-shirt-wearing, red-flag-waving socialist is sacrilegious. They call me a traitor. A house tranny. Or, more crudely, a fascist.

The above is from this article in the Spectator, and it's well worth reading in full:

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2018/08/why-cant-lefties-deal-with-a-transsexual-conservative/

David

I was reminded of this, from a few years ago:

When I was a teenager taking A-levels, my class was told – ominously, several times - that the minimum grades for acceptance at university were two ‘A’s and a ‘B’. More recently, in 2011, while listening to Radio 4’s rural soap The Archers, I heard Ambridge’s teen eco-warrior Pip excitedly announce her A-level results – “a ‘B’ and two ‘C’s.” She was therefore, naturally, going to university.

Evidently, the lowering of standards is much worse than I realised at the time.

[+]

There are currently around £100bn in outstanding student loans, of which, according to some estimates, 83% are expected to be in default to varying degrees.

"What can't go on, won't."

David

Incidentally, David Craig’s book, The Great University Con: How we broke our universities and betrayed a generation, can be bought here, or for Amazon US, here.

Connor

For example, now, around 51% of all people going to university are getting in on three ‘D’s at A-level, or worse.

Great podcast: "A mis-selling scandal that with make PFI look like small beer".

That.

David

Great podcast: “A mis-selling scandal that with make PFI look like small beer”.

Yes, it’s worth hearing in full. The statistics alone, regarding grade inflation, employment figures, degree-waving dog-walkers, etc., are quite eye-widening.

David

Tim Newman on racist cup-holders.

Hal

. . . we can not only win concessions from the millionaire and billionaire class, . . .

There's a millionaire and billionaire class???

Yeahright.

One does things, rather than one is something.

In turn, one has money or a lack of money, one is never the mere collection of money . . .

Jen

These people are everywhere in the economy, living hand-to-mouth and doing idiot things like demanding “luxury communism now.”

That.

David

That.

The ongoing, massive oversupply of mediocre “creatives” - it’s a noun now, you know - has coincided with quite a few articles like this one from the Guardian, in which left-leaning novelist Brigid Delaney expects a nicer flat and a more glamorous lifestyle, at taxpayer expense, on account of her self-imagined importance to the turning of the world. You see, living within her means, as mere mortals do, would “compromise” her immense creativity.

The very next day, the Guardian also brought us the lamentations of Amien Essif, who was apparently shocked to discover that writing about “consumerism, gentrification and hegemony” isn’t a sure-fire way to pay the bills, let alone to live in a manner befitting a would-be member of the cultural elite. Naturally, rather than rethinking his own life choices, Mr Essif believes that taxpayers should be made to “subsidise creativity” – specifically, his own.

R. Sherman

Naturally, rather than rethinking his own life choices, Mr Essif believes that taxpayers should be made to “subsidise creativity” – specifically, his own.

To which, I reply, "Wallace Stevens, insurance executive.

And as far as public subsidies for "creatives," I note that only certain types of creativity warrant a spot at the public trough. No one ever talks about public subsidies for chemical engineers designing pharmaceutical plants. I wonder why that is . . . ?

David

And as far as public subsidies for “creatives,” I note that only certain types of creativity warrant a spot at the public trough.

It’s quite strange to watch these people parading an attitude, a swollen sense of entitlement to other people’s earnings, that for an earlier generation – my parents’ generation, certainly – would have been widely regarded as degenerate and mortifying.

David

And as far as public subsidies for “creatives,” I note that only certain types of creativity warrant a spot at the public trough.

It’s the flip-side of a conceit whereby all manner of “creativity” is bundled together so as to obscure distinctions between viable and not, and talented and not. As when Everyday Feminism’s Katherine Garcia bemoaned how hard it is to be taken seriously as “a creative… a multi-dimensional creature,” albeit one unburdened by any obvious talent:

Note the slyly catch-all term “creative work.” So far as I can make out, the creative people who earn a living in, say, visual effects departments or smartphone design aren’t generally regarded as infantile hobbyists. It does matter what kind of creative work a person is indulging in, along with the skill with which they do it and whether there’s a market for those skills and their results. To bundle all kinds of creativity together, and all levels of expertise, as if no distinctions should be made, as if all were equally valuable, is both woolly and disingenuous.

But if you poke through the archives – almost anything tagged ‘art’ – you’ll find dozens of iterations of the same dishonesty.

R. Sherman

It’s the flip-side of a conceit whereby all manner of “creativity” is bundled together so as to obscure distinctions between viable and not...

I present, "Five Syllables Without an Haiku:"

Sit On A Pickle.

Where's my check?

WTP

a swollen sense of entitlement to other people’s earnings, that for an earlier generation – my parents’ generation, certainly – would have been widely regarded as degenerate and mortifying.

My parents generation as well. What I learned in AP history in high school and later in macro economics in college was that my parents were just uneducated/ignorant people who simply did not understand the big picture. We owe everything to the philosophers. If you doubt that you could simply ask them. If you don't know any yourself, I can point you to one or two. My parents never had the "advantage" of a college education (or in Dad's case, completing one) to tell them how wrong they were. Heh...I remember how my silly father reacted when I told him (because I learned it in school, of course) that it was WW2 that ended the Great Depression. Even though he and my mom lived through it, they simply did not understand how reallocating resources to creating and then dropping tons of bombs on Europe and Japan and then spending tons of money to rebuild Europe and Japan is what really ended it. Well that and having the Germans and Japanese kill off a significant number of our able bodied men. Philosophers are educated and they understand these things, of course, what with their great vision and all. We really should be more appreciative. Really. And the to Nazis and Japs as well if you really think about it. Just think how good things would have been if only they had done more damage. Probably the main reason why we don't have flying cars today. Well that and a lack of government funding. Damn Republicans. But I understand they're learning as well.

I suppose you'll have to judge for yourself regarding your own parents. Sorry if I smashed any illusions but if you think about it you will realize it's really for your own good.

Governor Squid

...depending on skin tone, sex, orientation, or something else...they have an important and luminous story to tell because of what they are...

How many writers are submitting manuscripts with fake CVs and photos to make them appear to be socialist black LGBBQWTFOMG± amputees? Do we have any recent best-selling authors who refuse to do book-signings and appearances because of "crippling social anxiety" or the like?

Sam Duncan

“The number of people going to university has gone up from about 700,000 thirty years ago to over 2.3 million now”

It's worth bearing in mind that this is because the sooper-jeniuses of the Blair government saw that graduates in the '90s got better-paid jobs than non-graduates, and concluded that if everyone was a graduate, we'd all be professional high-flyers. It beggars belief that grown adults - graduates themselves - actually thought in this cargo-cult manner, but yes, they actually did. And these are the people now considered sane “moderates” in the Labour party.

“[T]hose on the left regard me as a Judas.”

I wonder what they'd make of Deirdre McCloskey, if they ever heard of her.

“There's a millionaire and billionaire class???”

It can't help picturing the author jumping into a hansom, lighting a pipe, and telling the cabman to drive of into the old pea-souper.

“creatives”

Oh, do not get me started...

Squires

Ayn Rand didn’t invent the character of Balph Eubank, she merely observed it, and saw where it led.

David

Oh, do not get me started...

As a noun, it’s so conveniently non-specific.

“So what do you do, then?”
“I’m a creative. Obviously.”

Spiny Norman

There are currently around £100bn in outstanding student loans, of which, according to some estimates, 83% are expected to be in default to varying degrees.

Waitaminute! Is this the UK? Hang on here: the younglings on internet social media continually demand that American universities should be free, as they are in the UK.

Are they full of shit about this, just as they are about everything else?

Daniel Ream

No one ever talks about public subsidies for chemical engineers designing pharmaceutical plants. I wonder why that is . . . ?

Um, most Western first world governments offer massive subsidies, tax incentives, and other forms of public support for technological R&D.

Do we have any recent best-selling authors who refuse to do book-signings and appearances because of "crippling social anxiety" or the like?

There's a non-trivial number of men writing romance novels under a female nom de plume because women won't buy trashy housewife porn written by a man. Since a significant portion of a genre writer's income can now come from conventions and book-signings, they suffer financially for it.

Pogonip

Fern Michaels, who’s been in the romance business forever, is a man. I forget his real name but ages ago he wrote an interesting article about the business.

If I had to choose between being forced to subsidize “creative” hipsters and being forced to subsidize Walmart, I guess I’d go with the hipsters as they’re probably cheaper, but I’d rather not subsidize hipsters OR Walmart.

Pedro

All those who are unemployed or unsatisfactorily employed or unemployable drift into the vocations in which standards are least definite or in which aptitudes and acquirements of a different order count. They swell the host of intellectuals in the strict sense of the term whose numbers hence increase disproportionately.

The correct and underused word for most of these lumpenintelligentsia types is loser. Like unemployed rustbelt workers, they don't have what it takes to compete in a globalized world.

But unlike rustbelt workers, who didn't vote to have their working conditions degraded by global competition, the lumpenintelligentsia are losers on terms they've chosen themselves, they're losers according to principles they celebrated on the assumption that they're turn out to be among the winners. Their "creative output" is as freely available on the Internet as everyone else's - so if they're not globally competitive they have no excuse, and there aren't many small ponds left where they can be a big fish.

A "creative" who's reached 25 years old with no sign of the kind of success that pays a mortgage should think about whether he'd be happy being a struggling genius at 35 or 45 years old. He'd probably be better off taking the kind of advice he'd give to the deplorable losers in the rustbelt - learn how to code, or train for a job in the thriving elder-care industry. And he can carry on his artistic projects in the evenings and weekends - if Philip Larkin and TS Eliot had day jobs, who has the right to to sneer at it?

Sam Duncan

“Are they full of shit about this, just as they are about everything else?”

Pretty much, yeah. Tuition fees are capped at £9,000 p.a. (which, of course, our students say is still too much; clearly, since the cap exists, it's not nearly enough), but they do exist. In England. The great statesmen of the Scottish Parliament abolished them a few years back for all EU citizens except the English. But don't call them Nazis.

(I'm not sure about Wales and Northern Ireland. My impression is that Wales is the same as England. Ulster, I've no idea.)

Zionist Overlord #73

The wiki for Fern Michaels refers to her as female.

Pogonip

The Wiki is wrong. His real name is Michael Something (of the Boston Somethings, I believe.)

My gosh, the Internet’s wrong! What’s the world coming to?

Fred the Fourth

Too many artists...
I've probably told this story here before, but anyway...
Many many years after I graduated, I was at UC Berkeley, walking up Bancroft Avenue from Sproul Plaza. I'm about to pass a middle-age man sitting on a low wall next to the sidewalk. He has that subtle look of the college town person who never really re-entered the real world following his stint at Uni.
As I pass, I clearly hear him mutter "Mammas, don't let your babies grow up to be artists."
So perhaps reality can set in, and enlightenment strike. Even if it takes a decade or two.

Governor Squid

It's worth bearing in mind that this is because the sooper-jeniuses of the Blair government saw that graduates in the '90s got better-paid jobs than non-graduates, and concluded that if everyone was a graduate, we'd all be professional high-flyers. It beggars belief that grown adults - graduates themselves - actually thought in this cargo-cult manner, but yes, they actually did.

This was observed by Instapundit back in 2010, and subsequently labeled "Reynolds' Law":

"The government decides to try to increase the middle class by subsidizing things that middle class people have: If middle-class people go to college and own homes, then surely if more people go to college and own homes, we’ll have more middle-class people. But homeownership and college aren’t causes of middle-class status, they’re markers for possessing the kinds of traits — self-discipline, the ability to defer gratification, etc. — that let you enter (and stay in) the middle class. Subsidizing the markers doesn’t produce the traits; if anything, it undermines them."

billdehaan

@David

Theodore Dalrymple on plain speaking and its enemies.

It is clear that "Trudy" mentioned therein fills a much-needed void.

David

the Blair government… concluded that if everyone was a graduate, we’d all be professional high-flyers. It beggars belief that grown adults - graduates themselves - actually thought in this cargo-cult manner, but yes, they actually did.

They don’t seem to comprehend a basic fact. The intelligence doesn’t come from the university.

Damian

Is This the Stupidest Book Ever Written About Socialism?

After slogging through 276 of the book’s 282 pages of bad history and, I hate to tell you, “tepid” jokes, the authors finally get around to their grand plan. Spoiler alert! This is literally it, in its entirety:

“After setting everyone on equal footing (by seizing the billionaires’ money, socializing their wealth, and handing the keys of production over to workers), you’re looking at an economy that requires something like a three-hour workday, with machines taking care of most of the drudgery; and—as our public fund pays for things like health care, education, scientific research, and infrastructure—all this technology actually makes work quicker, easier, and more enjoyable.”

Darleen

Thought I'd share the latest from California -- Gov Jerry Brown just signed a bill eliminating all money bail.

Pogonip

Good for him!

lotocoti

Education is not as important as everyone thinks.

Darleen

Pogonip

Not only NOT good, but will increase crime that has already gone up in this criminal coddling state.

WTP

as our public fund pays for things like health care, education, scientific research, and infrastructure—

Because money by itself just does stuff. Things will simply appear if we go through the magic motions of handing green pieces of paper to each other.

Pogonip

All the hogs should be slopped out of the same trough. People have sat in jail for months on misdemeanor charges because they couldn’t buy their way out. No bail for anyone.

I can’t remember which one, but some state is setting up an algorithm to decide if someone’s a flight risk. My experience with computers does not make me optimistic about this. I’d prefer a system where non-violent suspects are released on their own recognizance and violent ones aren’t. If that means Mr. Bigshot sits in jail with the peasants for 6 months while waiting to come to trial, too bad.

Pogonip

Hi Lotocoti,

At least she’s not insisting everyone should go to college!

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Education is not as important as everyone thinks.

“Yes, education is not as important as everyone thinks. Africans have survived thousands of years without it.

The operative word being "survived", which is not exactly the same thing as "flourished".

If that means Mr. Bigshot sits in jail with the peasants for 6 months while waiting to come to trial, too bad.

Except you know it won't, because Mr. Bigshot will have an army of expensive lawyers to convince Judge "thanks for the campaign donation" Zotz to let him walk, whereas Joe Baggadonuts will have a public defender who has 100 other clients and might remember how to spell Joe's last name.

Hopp Singg

Out with education, in with indoctrination. They're being quite clear about that.

This will go swimmingly when ebola comes calling.

R. Sherman

The elimination of cash bail options presumably does not do away with surety bonds as bail. Cash bail, at least in my jurisdiction, is always an option, but most people pay 10% to a bail bondsman. Cash bail is only required for people who've already failed to appear to answer charges.

Further, the risk of absconding is not the only consideration. The majority of people accused of crimes have long histories of contacts with the criminal justice system. For many, the inability to make bail at least keeps puts their criminal activity on hiatus for a few months.

R. Sherman

I should also mention, those people who cannot afford bail for a misdemeanor, usually can't afford the fine if they're convicted and normally get sentenced to time served. Additionally, people charged with crimes are usually given a preliminary arraignment within 48 hours if they're in jail. If they cannot post a bond--cash or surety--judges will order an pretrial release investigation to determine their suitability for an OR release. Suffice it to say, having people stay months in jail waiting for a misdemeanor trial disposition is extraordinarily rare and undoubtedly due to some sort of administrative "F"-up and not the fact that a cash bond was required.

Pogonip

Thanks, R. Sherman!

There are an awful lot of those administrative screw-ups...

Darleen

The elimination of cash bail options presumably does not do away with surety bonds as bail.

Not in CA's SB10 that Brown signed. In or out of custody before pretrial is by assessment only. All misdemeanor arrests, except for domestic violence or 3rd DUI within 10 years, are to be released within 12 hours of booking. In felony cases, there are supposed to be some 'violent offenses' that will remain in custody until arraignment, ineligible for early assessment, but CA's definition of "violent crime" is pretty damn narrow. For instance, felony arson is not considered "violent."

The court is directed by this law to take the least restrictive measures prior to pretrial. Felonies will be assessed as low, medium and high risk with high risk the only ones considered to be kept in jail.

The ACLU was among the sponsors of the original bill, but are now opposing it as passed because the "pretrial assessment group" will be organized by the county courts with judges' input and also allows prosecutors to object in court when they disagree with the group's finding.

I'm assuming (I have to go back and trace the history) the ACLU wanted a group picked and fully independent of the court plus cutting the prosecutor out of the assessment completely.

I look at the Mental Disorder Diversion sh*tstorm that just got dumped on us and the da gets next to no input in on that one. Only one mental health professional will examine the defendant and THAT person is the sole pick of the defense.

I would also add that *if* someone is sitting in jail on a misdemeanor waiting for pretrial "for months" then look at the defense attorney. In CA someone in custody has to be arraigned within 2 business days AND if they don't waive time they have to have their pre-trial within 30 days.

R. Sherman

There are an awful lot of those administrative screw-ups...

No, there are not "an awful lot." They are very, very rare, despite propaganda to the contrary. (In NYC, for example, the average pretrial stay in jail for misdemeanors is seventeen days.) I keep track of these things, and I can think of one case from New Mexico in the past several years. And yes, it was a heinous f-up, but the public entity paid a huge amount of money to the victim. But it's only one case.

People sit in pretrial misdemeanor detention for reasons far beyond not being able to pony up a cash bond. As indicated, cash is required only when someone has failed to appear at least once and more often twice or more and warrants have been issued for their arrest. Judges don't just throw people in pretrial lock-up for grins. There's not enough room for one thing and it costs public entities money for another.

I do criminal defense and there are a lot of areas in criminal justice which deserve reform, IMHO. But reform should not be predicated on wildly sensationalist propaganda.

Darleen

There are an awful lot of those administrative screw-ups...

What's "a lot"?

Can I offer some numbers off the top of my head from my office? I'm one of 4 locations within my county and we process 1/2 of all cases in the county (misdemeanor & felonies - all infractions are not reviewed or processed by the DA office)

We processed over 70,000 cases last year in the county. My office did about 35K of them. We are flooded with misdemeanors.

We have two misdemeanor pre-trial departments, calendars are 4 days a week. The calendars are running over 100 cases/day/department so that's between 700-800 cases/week. Pretrials are usually calendared 5-7 days after arraignment. That's also to give time for at least one continuance if the defendant doesn't waive time. Our judges push real hard not to allow a case to be continued more than 3 times. Settle or set ready for trial.

Out-of-custody misdemeanors we file, we issue an arraignment with a date 8 weeks out from when we mail the letter. All those discovery packets are placed by date so within a couple of days after arraignment a clerk looks them up in the court system to see what happened (ddas don't appear on arraignments - except maybe for very serious crimes like murder, where they may have to counter bail motions by the defense)

Let's say we have 30-40 1st time arraignments for Wednesday ... only about 10-15 people will show. Of that 10-15, half will plead directly to the court the other half will have a pretrial date set. The rest will fail to appear and have a bench warrant issued. Because so many FTA/BW, then are picked up and cited out with a promise to appear - THEN FTA/BW all over again, our judges only allow that 3 times then they are kept in custody for video arraignment & in custody pretrial within a few days of the arraignment.

Hope this wasn't boring.

Chester Draws

Most of the world doesn't have money bail.

How do the Europeans cope?

Discussions about "only" waiting a couple of weeks for misdemeanors ignores the effects of that wait. How many of us here would treat two weeks inside lightly?

Losing your job over a misdemeanor is not really an effective way to keep the marginally criminal in work and therefore on a path out.

David

Today’s word is gratitude.

“My pronouns are they and their.”

Tim Newman

There's a non-trivial number of men writing romance novels under a female nom de plume because women won't buy trashy housewife porn written by a man.

Can confirm.

David

Can confirm.

It’s all coming out now.

David
Butler later claimed she was just making a political statement.

The tolerant left, part 3,097.

Hal

Can confirm.

It’s all coming out now.

Oh. So that's why you started suddenly wiping the bar. A lot.

Zionist Overlord #73

@pogonip

The Wiki is wrong. His real name is Michael Something (of the Boston Somethings, I believe.)

My gosh, the Internet’s wrong! What’s the world coming to?

At the risk of belaboring the obvious, from my perspective your post is also part of "The Internet". It therefore becomes a question, which part of the internet is wrong? A post by pogonip or:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fern_Michaels
http://www.webbiography.com/biographies/fern-michaels
https://www.amazon.com/Fern-Michaels/e/B000API3A4/

To be honest, I'm actually interested in the article you mentioned. Fern Michaels the person - not so much.

Lancastrian Oik

Further, the risk of absconding is not the only consideration. The majority of people accused of crimes have long histories of contacts with the criminal justice system. For many, the inability to make bail at least keeps puts their criminal activity on hiatus for a few months.

This is how we Brits (well, the English and Welsh parts- they do things different north of the border) go about things: The Bail Act 1976.

My early career was spent as a Senior Crown Prosecutor with the then fledgling CPS, the equivalent of a junior DA. I worked in a very busy magistrates' court (here in the UK, everything criminal goes through the magistrates court at first instance) and I was often tasked with horse-trading bail decisions with defence lawyers for those who I and the police felt could be released and then engaging in a series of hearings where the magistrates (usually lay volunteers guided by a legally qualified clerk) would get to decide who stayed "banged up" and who got out with conditions: residence, curfew, non-contact with witnesses, not to go to a particular locale, etc. Sureties were a rare thing indeed. On the whole it worked; those with long criminal records, histories of violence or serial failure to turn up when required stayed in, everybody else got bail either with or without conditions.

Those refused bail in those days (late 80s/early 90s) retained jail privileges not available to them when finally sentenced; unlimited phone calls (the inevitable black market in trading telephone cards in jail sprang up), daily visits (an opportunity for the smuggling of drugs and another black market) and the right to wear civilian clothes. For the majority it meant an ability to lead a relatively sybaritic lifestyle in that the few comforts available made it preferable to do your time "on remand" (refused bail) rather than under the harsher regime of prison, and was an incentive to spin out proceedings as long as possible before either being convicted or pleading guilty and receiving the inevitable custodial sentence.

Incidentally, doing this stuff for a living had a profound effect because after a couple of years' exposure to the hopeless circumstances of life for many defendants (the majority were just plain stupid; see Dalrymple, passim.) and the sheer nastiness of of a few genuinely evil individuals who would never ever reform, my hitherto impeccably liberal/Left political views had already begun to change; so, for example, when Lefty folkster Billy Bragg came up with the fatuous "Rotting On Remand" as a response to the inevitable consequences of the policies outlined in the previous paragraph I just had to laugh. Talk about being nutted by reality....

WTP

My pronouns are they and their.

I’m damn close to going full misanthrope. You’ll know I’ve done it when I change my pronouns to there and they’re .

David

I’m damn close to going full misanthrope.

After ten years of this, it’s amazing I remain such a charming human being.


What?

Pogonip

Fern’s a man. His article appeared some 30-35 years ago in a book called “How to Write a Romance Novel and get it Published.” In those pre-Amazon days, romance was one of the few fields where a new writer who didn’t know anybody could get a foot in the door, because editors couldn’t afford to be snobbish. Romance fans read voraciously. It was common to see a woman coming out of a used bookstore with a grocery sack full of paperbacks. Unfortunately, the writers were unanimous that since the readers read 6 books a month on average, they’d catch you faking it, so you had to love the genre to work in it.

R. Sherman

Incidentally, doing this stuff for a living had a profound effect because after a couple of years' exposure to the hopeless circumstances of life for many defendants (the majority were just plain stupid; see Dalrymple, passim.)

I second that, especially the "plain stupid" part. Which brings me to . . .

Losing your job over a misdemeanor is not really an effective way to keep the marginally criminal in work and therefore on a path out.

As Darleen notes above, a person charged with a misdemeanor really has to be a screw up to wind up in jail. In my jurisdiction, 90% of people charged with misdemeanors are released with a summons on a promise to appear. If they don't show up, they get a card in the mail. If they don't show up again, a warrant is issued and a bond amount set (maximum amount $500) which can be had by paying 10% to a bondsman. Judges also allow a posting of 10% with a promise to pay an additional $450 if there's another FTA. Cash only bonds don't make an appearance until someone's failed to show up at least three times.

Further, even for those convicted of misdemeanors who can't pay the fines, judges allow jail as an alternative to be served on weekends or days off from work. Suffice it to say, it's not exactly "Cool Hand Luke" out there.

David
That value, that business of believing in hard work… I didn’t see it so much. And we would give [black] kids excuses - we would give kids excuses to fail.

Dave Rubin interviews headmistress Katherine Birbalsingh.

The anecdote, 20 minutes in, about a meeting for low-income minority parents being aggressively disrupted by white middle-class lefties shrieking obscenities may sound familiar, if not amuse.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

When this is all you have to worry about, you really might not have a life.

R. Sherman

Re: Katherine Birbalsingh.

She highlights what essentially is the racism of the White Left--"middle class" in the UK, I guess. There must be a white savior at all costs. How dare POC have agency and exercise responsibility for choosing their own path. See e.g. Candace Owens.

For some reason, I was reminded of the novel and movie of a few years back, The Help, which garnered much praise on the Left in this country. My response at the time, was, "Well, of course. The hero is the 'Southern White Girl of Privilege' who goes off to Left-Wing Yankee College and then swoops in to rescue the poor benighted black domestics."

The Left's identity politics must have a "Magic White Person" to survive.

David

How dare POC have agency and exercise responsibility for choosing their own path.

Like so many other examples, it does rather suggest that the lefties in question aren’t terribly interested in outcomes or enabling choice - and are not naturally inclined to regard their Designated Victim Groups as consisting of actual people with preferences of their own. Instead, these Designated Victim Groups seem to exist more as scenery and furniture – primarily there to decorate the lefties’ own self-flattering drama.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

How dare POC have agency and exercise responsibility for choosing their own path.

Related, over at Farcebook, having an internal group suggesting it might be a tad politically biased is wrongthink.

The new group has upset other Facebook employees, who said its online posts were offensive to minorities. One engineer, who declined to be identified for fear of retaliation, said several people had lodged complaints with their managers about FB’ers for Political Diversity...

Bet the ranch that the people kvetching were not "minorities".

Pogonip

“Dozens at Facebook will soon be fired.”

And all I could see was the headline.

David

When this is all you have to worry about, you really might not have a life.

But it’s terrible that an item of biscuit packaging isn’t dismantling capitalism. As biscuit packaging should, apparently.

pst314

The new group has upset other Facebook employees

A leftist fool said "the arc of history bends towards justice".
It is more accurate to say "the arc of leftism bends towards totalitarianism."

pst314

Bet the ranch that the people kvetching were not "minorities".

I won't take that bet, but it is true that "minority" leftists are just as intolerant.

Spiny Norman

Bet the ranch that the people kvetching were not "minorities".

Bet the ranch that FB has no minorities among their senior staff.

Spiny Norman

Pogonip,

And all I could see was the headline.

I can report that it does include the phrase, "critics seized".

("Republicans/Conservatives pounced" has gone out of fashion lately.)

dcardno

Paging James Damore... Paging James Damore...

Pogonip

Let’s hope he didn’t go to work at Farcebook, the poor guy will get fired AGAIN!

Pogonip

No paywall:

http://www.staradvertiser.com/2018/08/28/business/business-breaking/dozens-at-facebook-unite-to-challenge-its-intolerant-liberal-culture/

Hal

You’ll know I’ve done it when I change my pronouns to there and they’re .

My favorites are I, Me, and One.

Particularly with One quite covering anyone else regardless of circumstance, claimed circumstance or otherwise . . . .

Pogonip

The big unanswered question: what are Fern Michaels’s pronouns?

Joe Ego

dozens-at-facebook-unite-to-challenge-its-intolerant-liberal-culture

Meanwhile, from statista.com:

As of December 2017, 25,105 people were employed by the social networking company

So somewhere on the order of a few thousandths of the staff are willing to speak up.

Rana

Pogonip, are you confusing Fern Michaels with Jennifer Wilde, which was the pen name of a man named Tom Huff, and who wrote historical romances in the late 1970s and early 1980s?

Pogonip

I don’t think so, but it’s possible. It’s been a long time since I read that book.

sH2

But it’s terrible that an item of biscuit packaging isn’t dismantling capitalism. As biscuit packaging should, apparently.

She went to Bowdoin College. $50,000 a year.

David
In an effort to avoid “problematic” search terms, a public university’s library system recently added several new immigration subject headings to its library database, cataloguing immigrant-related material under titles like “noncitizens” and “undocumented immigrants” so that students might avoid search terms like “illegal aliens.”

You see, reality is problematic, and so being “inclusive” and “more ethical” entails learning not to think in a remotely realistic way.

David

She went to Bowdoin College. $50,000 a year.

But of course. This kind of idiocy isn’t arrived at by accident. You have to pay for it, if you want that all-important woke status.

David

Two words. Guardian contributor.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

In an effort to avoid “problematic” search terms, a public university’s library system recently added several new immigration subject headings...

Alternatives to the term “illegal aliens” now include “noncitizens,” “undocumented immigrants” and “undocumented immigrant children.”

I guess looking up info on Operation Wetback is going to be completely out of the question, then.

Two words. Guardian contributor.

I piss and moan over inconsequentials for the generations of women before me, and unlike me, who did actual work.
David

I piss and moan over inconsequentials for the generations of women before me, and unlike me, who did actual work.

Needless to say, said item was retweeted, unironically, by Ms Laurie Penny.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Meanwhile in today's exciting installment of "Let's All Get Offended Over Nothing", another small problem in movie casting.

When HBO announced the project last July, critics online took umbrage with Dinklage's casting, accusing the broadcaster of promoting "yellowface", as Villechaize had long-been described as being "half-Filipino".

One would think the SJW crowd would be giddy as schoolgirls that a movie is being made about a dwarf actor who had a role other than a Munchkin, but even if Villechaize was part Filipino, for some strange reason I don't think Hollywood is really awash in half-Filipino dwarves who got cheated out of a part by another wypipo.

Tom

Meanwhile in today's exciting installment of "Let's All Get Offended Over Nothing"...

Next out of the gate is Scope (a disability charity) complaining that a non-disabled actor was cast in the role of Joseph Merrick, the Elephant Man.

Jesus wept.

Following this logic, and I use that word with some reservation, to its natural conclusion, will they only be casting actual serial killers and rapists in movies about those types of criminals? How many roles, outside of the Elephant Man, would be open to someone with Proteus syndrome?

David
Order and structure make you free.

The second part of the interview with Katherine Birbalsingh.

Governor Squid

The new terms “may foster student academic success by creating inclusive atmospheres,” the announcement on the website reads.

"I'd like to thank my parents, my colleagues, and the members of the Society for granting me this recognition today. But most of all, I'd especially like to thank the university librarians for adding inclusive euphemisms to the search database. Without those euphemisms, I doubt I'd have been able to complete my studies, and I wouldn't be standing before you now."

David

But most of all, I'd especially like to thank the university librarians for adding inclusive euphemisms to the search database.

As Charles Cooke noted last year, “If our colleges continue down this road, they are going to create a host of extremely weird, hyper-sensitive people who have no earthly idea how to converse and interact with the sane.”

WTP

“If our colleges continue down this road, they are going to create a host of extremely weird, hyper-sensitive people who have no earthly idea how to converse and interact with the sane.”

I don't understand. What did he mean by "are going to"?

Farnsworth M Muldoon

How many roles, outside of the Elephant Man, would be open to someone with Proteus syndrome?

Given the recent trend to cast, for example, a Somali female as Tsar Nikolai II, any historical white male, but never, ever, as either a freak, monster, or disabled person, because those would be stereotypical and demeaning.

Governor Squid

What did he mean by "are going to"?

They're just getting warmed up, my friend. Wait 'til you see what they can do once they get a little momentum!

jabrwok

Australian Aboriginal Values: https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/271152/child-sex-abuse-crisis-leftists-dont-want-you-know-danusha-v-goska

Because Noble Savage!

WTP

Australian Aboriginal Values

Yeah, lost me at

Australian Aborigines' hunting and burning practices may have altered that landmass' climate dramatically, according to University of Colorado at Boulder Professor Gifford Miller. Humans armed only with flint-knapped obsidian blades and fire kits proved quite expert at "raping the planet."
Australia is totes big. I went there once and only saw a really, really tiny part of it, so like first-hand knowledge and stuff.

bgates

My pronouns are they and their.

I identify as a man in the 1990s, which means it's not offensive when I say the above is ludicrous.

My pronouns are he and his; my verb tenses are future and future perfect continuous, as in, I will have been delighted once Trump gets elected in 2016.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

I identify as a man in the 1990s, which means it's not offensive when I say the above is ludicrous.

I identify as a psychiatrist in the 1950s, which means I can have them put on a locked ward where they will not be a danger either to themselves or others.

Squires

Australian Aboriginal Values

IIRC Black Ball has brought this up before; specifically the failure of the culturally lobotomized, morally castrated Australian authorities to do anything.

TomJ
But most of all, I'd especially like to thank the university librarians for adding inclusive euphemisms to the search database.

British forces in the Falkland Islands used to refer to the islanders as Bennys, after a character in the soap Crossroads. This was seen as offensive (almost certainly accurately) and The Powers That Be banned the use of the term. Troops then started calling the islanders Stills, as in "he's still Benny". This, of course, was still unacceptable and the use of the term Stills was banned. The troops then moved on to calling them Andys: "And he's still Benny"…

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