David Thompson
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January 26, 2009

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carbon based lifeform

Hilarious. It's like a Terry Gilliam cartoon.

TDK

They carried on using visual and audio detection after radar.

1. In the UK the stations were on the coast which meant that inland the planes had to be tracked using old methods. Same was true elsewhere
2. Radar could be jammed with Window, so you needed a backup.

If you think about it the hydrophone is fundamentally the same idea (albeit in water a better medium). That's still used.

Dr. Westerhaus

My main interest in this was triggered by the idea of 'handy big-ears' for various uses that could be available commercially - it appears someone has done just that:

http://www.inewidea.com/index.php?s=matthias

Anna

I want the bright red batphones. For clubbing. :D

Dr. Westerhaus

And of further interest, here's the Wikipedia entry for Denge, the Kent 'acoustic mirror array', with some excellent photos:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denge

John D

Thanks David (and Dr W). I'd never heard of these things before.

AntiCitizenOne

I weren't dropping no eaves Mr Gandalf sir.

M.Obl

Airphonic listening posts were all the rage once. The technology was quite sophisticated and reasonably effective. The Italians built a chain of 13 listening posts around their fleet anchorage at Taranto in the 1930's. These posts actually detected British reconnaissance aircraft taking station outside the harbor in advance of the strike force that attacked the Italian battle fleet at anchor on the night of November 11, 1940. Unfortunately for the Italians they had not integrated their air defense systems very well. Their anti-aircraft units and pursuit pilots were not equipped or trained to operate effectively during periods of limited visibility. That night attack was a pretty gutsy move by the RN.

Like most historians, I’m filled with useless bits of information….

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