David Thompson
Subscribe

Categories

Blog powered by Typepad

« Fresh Air | Main | Friday Ephemera »

May 22, 2018

Comments

Spiny Norman

Farnsworth,

...who knew he had a sense of humor ?

It does stand out when it (occasionally) appears.

Sorry for the awkward redundancy in that line you quoted. I seriously did not intend to write "seriously" twice. Seriously Honestly.

Richard Cranium

I view Hal's posts as further evidence of the insanity to be found in the San Francisco area.

YMMV.

Hal

You'd have to completely avoid the teevee news and the internet itself to be unaware who the Media's new "superstar teen heroes" are.

Bingo!!! Give the man a pickled egg . . . .--Albeit not entirely so much of no internet . . .

I will have a wander through the SF Chronicle/SFGate website to see of local occurrences, and will do a skim through the Google news aggregations for the US and UK, where I peer at the general headlines . . . But very particularly, I have no interest in reciting factoids in a trivia contest, all that one needs do is to eyeball the assorted headlines in many instances, I'm simply keeping up on the news.

I do have a look through /. for generally tech related Stuff . . . and . . . Oh, I'm blanking on the name but there is some blog off in the northern middleish England area that does keep being entertaining . . . .

---A viewing and reading hint, one doesn't actually have to watch the videos. Really. Yes, David posts 'em, but when one's seen one artistic pratfall, one's seen 'em all.

Oh, and as far as the goddamn noisy box, there are people who have their shows, and I do have mine . . . The Oscars and The State Of the Union Address, which tells you how often I bother staring at some formal broadcast---Albeit I'll grant that as I recall I didn't bother with the latter during Bush II, and happily did go back to watching as soon as the US was back to having a viable president again.

Yes I have had proclamations from assorted directions of Yuh Gotta See Dis Vihdeo!!!!

Ah, No. I don't.

You will get me the text, because I regularly read faster than some git meandering through some long winded paragraph of paragraphs.

And so, quite yes, just because a cat sneezes and triggers the posting of a twit, there is no reason or likelihood that I'm ever going to be aware of it.

Next you'll claim that, despite your vaunted "google skilz", that you've no idea who David Hogg is.

Quite, again. Between the two of us, with your apparent all out fascination with the fellow, I can only deduce he is your all time favorite drinking buddy and was the best man at your wedding . . . . whoeverthehell David Hogg is.

---He quite definitely may have been involved in something where I did indeed skim through a related headline, even over a couple of days or so, but I'm not remembering the name and rather expect he simply wasn't even interesting enough to put into a headline.

Suggesting that . . . Gonzalez is "perfectly conservative" . . .

Weeeellll, you posted the parameters, and I simply filled in your framework . . . From what I see, she doesn't seem to be right wing, and from what you posted, she doesn't seem to be left wing, therefore that leaves her bookended in between those two mere extremes.

And, certainly as always and will ever be, no amount of frantic denials are ever going to turn politics into being only the mere left Or the mere right. And, we who are quite in between and actually getting things done will remain centered and in balance . . . . and staring at the volleys as the posing extremes continue to scream their empty and pointless agendas at each other.

Hal

I view Hal's posts as further evidence of the insanity to be found in the San Francisco area.

I know, I know, you find horrifying and shocking the ideas of accuracy and attention to the actual details . . .

Spiny Norman

I see the pompous, self-righteous ass has returned. Gawd damn, Hal, you are so full of shit. You can go ahead and post more of your long-winded "smartest guy in the room" drivel if you must, but frankly, I'm done with you.


postimg.org

TomJ
when is supper?

Supper is a faintly genteel term for the evening meal, more commonly (though not exclusively) used in the south. Not be to be confused with the usage more common in the north, which is a snack before bed, hours after dinner (or indeed tea).

Do keep up.

Unless one is north of the Wall. Up in Caledonia, an X supper is X served with chips*; rather than ordering fish and chips one would ask for a fish supper. It is, of course, perfectly acceptable to order a chip supper.

* NB this is using the proper English definition of chips, not using it to mean crisis like the Left-pondians do.

David

I don’t think english muffins and crumpets are the same thing.

Frankly, I’m scandalised by the confusion. It’s an outrage.

[ Added: ]

Even this place in Seattle, which claims to specialise in crumpets, seems only to offer appallingly undercooked and anaemic ones, disguised with ludicrous toppings. Cucumber, for God’s sake. The whole point of a crumpet is to combine a crunchy exterior with a softer, butter-absorbent interior. Which is why they tend to be better when heated vigorously under a grill rather than in a toaster.

It’s an affront to all decency, I tell you. Prepare my galleon!

David

Unless one is north of the Wall.

That’s madness. No-one goes north of the Wall. Not after dark.

Ted S., Catskill Mtns., NY, USA

Live in London? Play Murder Bingo.

Buzzword Bingo

PiperPaul

Montreal crumpets, probably not the correct English kind but also messy and tasty with the right toppings.
But I also enjoy pickled "eggs" dipped in hump fat on Fairmount bagels.

David

messy and tasty with the right toppings.

I think we’d better establish what the right toppings are. I trust we can agree on butter, and possibly Marmite, but after that things get contentious.

David

Tim Newman ponders qualifications.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

I trust we can agree on butter, and possibly Marmite...

Marmite ? I thought that was stuff countertops were made from.

David

Marmite ? I thought that was stuff countertops were made from.

[ Summons henchlesbians. ]

Zionist Overlord #73

@Spiny Norman

Shouldn't that be "thou shalt" ?

[Flees for safety]

Tim Newman

Oh, for the the love . . . Just once, I wish someone would have the huevos to tell these humorless scolds to go fuck themselves.

To be fair, the pretty lass who wore the Chinese dress to her prom did, only politely.

David

Your weekly reminder that people often lie, sometimes quite shamelessly.

Note the involvement of the ludicrous Shaun King.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Note the involvement of the ludicrous Shaun King.

That is his slave name, he prefers either Talcum X or Martin Luther Cream, and according to this, he is the real victim of this episode.

David

and according to this, he is the real victim of this episode.

Ah yes, of course. It was “painful” for him - eagerly making those baseless, unchecked, potentially life-ruining claims and invoking “facts” that were merely the invention of a spiteful imagination. He was the one being “victimised.”

DrCromarty

Could I suggest another Shaun King moniker? Nelson Wan-dela
You’re welcome

Sam

I think we’d better establish what the right toppings are.

Cheese obviously.
Marmite optional.

But never ever f*cking cucumber.

David

Cheese obviously. Marmite optional.

Good sense prevails.

But never ever f*cking cucumber.

Amen, brother. Testify!

You can slather jams and all kinds of nonsense on a muffin, but if crumpets have a topping (besides butter) it should be minimal and savoury. This stuff should be taught in schools. With fines for being wrong.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

I think we’d better establish what the right toppings are.

Peanut butter and crispy American bacon. You'll thank me later.

Your arteries maybe not, but those can be fixed.

David

Peanut butter and crispy American bacon.

See, you were veering off course with the whole peanut butter thing, but the bacon idea intrigues.

Though it’s somewhat outlandish.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Though it’s somewhat outlandish.

Until the rozzers start policing toppings as they do tweets, go for it. A quick check of Amazon UK shows you can get proper American peanut butter (Peter Pan, Jif, and Skippy) and Oscar Mayer bacon (called American bacon instead for some reason).

You try it, and I'll spot you the cost, you could be a trend setter.

Jonathan

Note the involvement of the ludicrous Shaun King.

Could the falsely accused Trooper sue the f**kers?

WTP

Well since I started all this crumpet nonsense...

Yes, peanut butter and bacon seems to be the in-thing, or was a couple years ago when I first encountered it out in Colorado ski country. I had some sort of peanut butter, bacon, and...idunno, pork or something. It sounded intriguing and I'm always up for a challenge. I don't get the attraction. Just a couple months ago I had peanut butter and bacon on a waffle (again, ski country). It was OK but, meh. Prolly a good thing to start a ski day, especially as we were having them at the top of a 10K + foot mountain. But still, meh food-wise.

I now see that I have had crumpets. I think Mom served them some mornings. She was a great cook but IIRC the crumpets were from Pepperage Farms or some such. Not much taste to them. Slathered them with jam (cause jelly don't shake like that...OCD truly is a sickness). I presume having them home made or fresh from a bakery would make a difference. When I do do carbs in the morning, a rare thing usually force on me by the One Who Must Be Obeyed, I have always enjoyed a simple English Muffin (Pepperage Farms are just fine) with just butter on it. Bliss. But now I'm curious...are English Muffins, as we call them, even a thing in England? I don't recall seeing them but it has been years and my interest in a full English Breakfast is mostly meat-oriented.

Captain Nemo

I quite like a little Patum Peperium* on my crumpets. It's one of the most satisfying savoury flavours I know of. It's not something you want to go overboard with. You certainly don't go slathering it on - a thin scraping is more than enough.

*Also called Gentleman's Relish. It used to be available in ceramic pots, but they switched to plastic a while ago. I still haven't quite got over it.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Yes, peanut butter and bacon seems to be the in-thing...

If so, my grandfather was way the hell ahead of his time as he was the one who introduced it to we wee Muldoons.

David

But now I’m curious...are English Muffins, as we call them, even a thing in England?

Here in the developed world, muffins look like this, or like this.

Obviously, these are not to be confused with the other kind of muffin, which is a sort of spongy bunlet with unappetising bits of fruit in it.

Jonathan

...people often lie, sometimes quite shamelessly.

Many such Cases!

Which leads to This:

POLICE BODY CAMERAS CAN THREATEN CIVIL RIGHTS OF BLACK AND BROWN PEOPLE, NEW REPORT SAYS

ComputerLabRat

Here in the developed world, muffins look like this, or like this.

Aha - from the outside those do look like what are called English Muffins sold in the US. Inside they are full of holes, I guess to get the butter all melted in, which is nice. But the only thing i have ever seen labeled crumpet at the store looked like an English Muffin on the outside but were so pale they looked unbaked, and I didn't buy it. Thanks for the tip that the topping needs to be savory - this uncouth Yank would just have put butter and jam on it.

I grew up in the rural Northeast US and my childhood books were all English ones - Wind in the Willows, Secret Garden, A Little Princess. As a wee rat my head was full of deep, dark forests, wuthering moors, and tea, crumpets, and scones.

Oh and growing up it was breakfast, dinner, and supper, but once I left home, the convention seemed to be breakfast lunch and dinner.

David

but were so pale they looked unbaked, and I didn’t buy it.

You do have to grill them, quite fiercely, or at a push toast them, to get them crunchy on the outside. A crumpet should look something like this, though ideally a little more scorched.

And if you must put jam on them, do it out of sight. Behind a curtain.

WTP

Inside they are full of holes, I guess to get the butter all melted in, which is nice.

Yes that seems more like I remember. No to get all hegemony and...uh...stuff, but the texture of the more fiber-y (if that's the right term...if it is a term) nature of the American English Muffin is a big factor in my enjoyment of the most optimal muffin experience.

Here in the developed world, muffins look like this, or like this.

My OCD again but then there's the kind Aerosmith sang about, re:

Backstroke lover always hidin' 'neath the cover 'Till I talked to my daddy he say

It goes on from there...

David

we wee Muldoons

Band name.

PiperPaul

One thing that's less common now in my area is Yorkshire Pudding, mainly because suet is difficult to find in grocery shops. Maybe I should check in pet stores.

David

Inside they are full of holes, I guess to get the butter all melted in, which is nice.

Crumpets, and to some extent muffins, exist chiefly as a pretext to consume large quantities of melted butter.

David

Next week we’ll be discussing how to enhance a bacon sandwich, and indeed whether one should.

jabrwok

how to enhance a bacon sandwich

Add more bacon. Done. (Avoid the "Gentlemen's Relish"...the Top Gear crew found some of that in a used car once...)

ComputerLabRat

Crumpets, and to some extent muffins, exist chiefly as a pretext to consume large quantities of melted butter.

Aww dangit, David! You are making me hungry!!

Tea I have in my desk drawer and there is a kettle in the break room, but now I've got an helluva craving for crumpets and melty butter!

I'm looking forward to the bacon sandwich discussion. Is that anything like a bacon butty (not that I know what that is either, but came across the term in an English murder mystery)? Is it something we Yanks have corrupted into the BLT?

jabrwok

I tried previewing this, but got a Not Found error. Let's see what "Post" does with it.

David

I’m… not familiar with the kind of thing I’m seeing.

ComputerLabRat

Wow...

Just...wow

Captain Nemo

I tried previewing this

I never thought I'd see the day when I thought that there was such a thing as too much bacon. Until today.

Chester Draws

Sorry, late to this thread due to travels.

Someone ought to get Bernie Sanders to take a decent trip through Sweden. The number of deodorant and sneaker brands on sale there would match anywhere in the world.

Sweden is not a Socialist country. It's a welfare state, which is entirely different.

In economic terms is only just left of the US, and way right of places like France.

It's also extremely progressive, which is why Bernie gets confused. He assumes all progressives back government control of the economy and services. He is badly wrong.

Sweden went a long way down the Socialist route, then recoiled when they discovered it was stuffing their economy.

Arkadiy

boldly we march into battle

Some context: the actual Russian words are the first line of a very well known revolutionary song:

"Boldly we'll march into battle for the power of the Soviets, and die to the last man in that struggle". This is not post-Soviet literature, this is red meat for the faithful of the Communist kind.

Darleen

[reviews crumpet v English muffins + appropriate topping debate. Smears toasted bagel with cream cheese.]

David

Smears toasted bagel with cream cheese.

I’m trying, quite hard, to think of some reason to object.

Nothing yet.

Hal

I see the pompous, self-righteous ass has returned.

Oh, were you absent?!

At any rate, aside from my having been still consistent and present all along, another easy observation is, If you don't want a question answered, Don't ask it.

Especially when you're already apparently petrified about the answer being completely accurate . . .

Hal

I’m… not familiar with the kind of thing I’m seeing.

Luther burger.

Hal

This is not post-Soviet literature, this is red meat for the faithful of the Communist kind.

I'm rather expecting the assessment being that the Soviet Union ended, the Russian Federation began, and for that reason, anything more current is going to be "post-Soviet", regardless of the content . . .

Richard Cranium

I see that Hal has accelerated his digging.

Rafi

slather jams

Album title.

David

Heh.

Sam Duncan

“Unless one is north of the Wall. Up in Caledonia, an X supper is X served with chips; rather than ordering fish and chips one would ask for a fish supper. It is, of course, perfectly acceptable to order a chip supper.”

And anything without chips is “single”. Order a “single fish” and you'll probably get two. Sometimes one and a half if they're big, but usually two.

Now, should I throw a massive rock into the pool of linguistic confusion and casually mention that “crumpet” means something else entirely up here as well?

Yes, I shall.

“Crumpets” are large and flat, like pancakes. They do generally have holes like “proper” crumpets, but it's not necessary. Your standard pancake is still a “crumpet”. But “pancakes” are drop scones. (Crumbs, Wikipedia's PC Scottish nationalism-lite* actually comes in handy for once.)

*No, guys, you do not need to translate trade names into bloody Gaelic. Let alone “Scots”.

David

“Crumpets” are large and flat, like pancakes.

This is exactly why Hadrian had that bloody wall built.

Alex deWinter

WTF is This?
being an account of an American's encounter with crumpets

(those of delicate sensibility, should any reside within this fine establishment, might want to avert their gaze)

My first (and thus far only) experience of crumpets was running across a package of a half dozen of them in Trader Joe's. Being as they had been mentioned upon the pages of various English mysteries I had perused, I thought I might give them a try. Upon getting them home, I found that they resembled English muffins, so I considered toasting them, but there was no such instruction on the package. In fact, there were no preparation instructions beyond 'heat & serve' upon said package. Thusly, I decanted three them onto a plate and zapped them in the microwave for perhaps 30 seconds. Meanwhile, I fetched a knife and fork.

Upon completion of the heating portion of the experiment, I extracted the plate, sliced off a small chunk, and got down to business. After a couple of bites, I decided they tasted like pancakes, so I fetched the syrup. They were quite tasty with syrup, so I had the other three that way for breakfast* the next morning.

* breakfast being the morning meal here in philistine California, as opposed to brunch (mid-morning), lunch (in the afternoon), and dinner (or supper, as the two words are interchangeable here) in the evening

David

I decanted three of them onto a plate and zapped them in the microwave for perhaps 30 seconds.

[ Tries to hide look of dismay and sickening horror. ]

Hal

I decanted three of them onto a plate and zapped them in the microwave for perhaps 30 seconds.

[ Tries to hide look of dismay and sickening horror. ]

Oh, dear. Would 90 seconds have been better?

David

Would 90 seconds have been better?

Microwaves are best used for warming plates, rather than anything you might put on them.

Trevor

Crumpets.

In my Birmingham childhood these were also called 'pikelets' ('poy-clits).

For the benefit of colonial patrons, I should explain that my native variant of English, known as Brummie, is the standard to which all discerning gentlefolk aspire, as I'm sure our host will enthusiastically affirm.

David

as I’m sure our host will enthusiastically affirm.

Sorry, I can’t hear you over the violent juddering of the drains.

Trevor

Sorry, I can't hear you ...

Sheer naked envy, there can be no other explanation.

Hal

Sorry, I can’t hear you over the violent juddering of the drains.

The rhine in spine stays minely in the pline.

The Hickory Wind

Hmm, this thread gets curiouser and curiouser. Back in rural Essex, where I was dragged up, we had dinner at lunchtime and tea at dinnertime. I thought supper was something Northerners did. Tea on Saturday's often involved muffins, which we called that even though we knew they were really crumpets. Tea on Sunday's was often bacon sandwiches, which we never called butties. The only butty was a sugar butty, which my father was fond of. My parents are both Cockneys (although my mother would never admit it), which might be relevant to some of those things. At school we had dinner, but you might bring it in in a lunchbox.

When I played cricket, though, we had lunch and tea. And at my University residence we had high tea at weekends. It seemed to consist mostly of toast, and was an attempt to hide the fact that kitchen staff left at midday. All very confusing.

David

All very confusing.

I recently learned that some people think the way to cook a crumpet is to fling it in a microwave. I need a moment to process my grief.

Alex deWinter
Oh, dear. Would 90 seconds have been better?

With a normal human microwave, indeed. Mine, however, appears to be an export from Muspelheim, and I have learned to heat things (especially anything resembling bread) in 30-second increments.

Trevor

The rhine in spine stays minely in the pline.

By Jove, you've got it!

Hal

The rhine in spine stays minely in the pline.

By Jove, you've got it!

Oops. Not quite.

The rhine in spine stys minely in the pline.

---See particularly Jilly Cooper and Class, where one of the social class character examples grows up being called Dive, and then later when he goes to work as a television broadcaster, starts calling himself Dave.

The Hickory Wind

All very confusing.

I recently learned that some people think the way to cook a crumpet is to fling it in a microwave. I need a moment to process my grief.

We used to do them on the grill. I hope this admission hasn't added to your distress. Oh, and it was butter. Nothing else.

fnord

Over at Ace's one of the cob's deprecates the practice of topping french toast ( which I believe is referred to a eggy bread in Blighty ) with maple syrup, and instead insists on salt.

This is, of course, an abomination.

He shall be dealt with.

TomJ
One thing that's less common now in my area is Yorkshire Pudding, mainly because suet is difficult to find in grocery shops.

It is only in the last few months I have essayed to prepare a Yorkshire pudding from scratch and was gratified by Joe ridiculously easy it is. The key to success is to preheat the pan and oil really really well before adding the batter.

Maybe I should check in pet stores.

Heathen.

Now, should I throw a massive rock into the pool of linguistic confusion…

Next try expplaining salt and sauce…

The comments to this entry are closed.

Blogroll