David Thompson
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May 08, 2020

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Nikw211

Can’t help noticing that the word imbalance, used repeatedly, seems tendentious, a tad question-begging.

While common-or-garden varieties of incompetence can't be ruled out, it does fairly reek of a carefully managed dishonesty. (Although as incompetence and dishonesty are complementary rather than mutually exclusive, it could be both at the same time).

On a related note, I came across this headline from The New York Times yesterday:

The purpose of that headline seems all too clear - to provoke outrage at the injustice of what, it insinuates, are the actions of a clearly racist and discriminatory NYPD.

Except it turns out that if you read down far enough, you discover this:

    Of those arrested, 35 people were black, four were Hispanic and one was white.

You also discover that the article itself was prompted by a statement originating from the DA's office of Brooklyn and refers to that borough only.

That this statement came out of Brooklyn seems to be quite significant to the story since that area's demographics break down to roughly the following:

    African American 64% Hispanic 30% Asian 3% White and other 3%

This information isn't mentioned at all, only alluded to here:

    More than a third of the arrests were made in the predominantly black neighborhood of Brownsville. No arrests were made in the more white Brooklyn neighborhood of Park Slope.

Anyone reading this who is unfamiliar with Brooklyn would be forgiven for thinking that the population of black and white residents are in roughly equal proportion, making the arrest rates a glaring anomaly.

Of course, it might be argued that the numbers of those arrested still show evidence of racist discrimination since if the NYPD were arresting people according to the demographic make-up of the area then it "should" have arrested 25 African Americans (not 35), 12 Hispanic Americans (not 4), two white people (not one) and one Asian American.

That Hispanic Americans were arrested at only a third of what would be expected according to demographics and that no Asian Americans were arrested at all seems to be a problem for the narrative that NYPD is incorrigibly racist.

Although quite why anyone would expect rates of arrest to be proportionate with demographic make up in the first place, something that seems to be the underlying assumption both here and in The Guardian piece on the gender of experts, is left unstated and unexplained.

Nikw211

Headline may need a slight rewrite

The following stood out to me for some reason:

    The year before, I’d been involved in a horrific mugging-gone-wrong, a near-death experience where, gun to my head on an Oakland sidewalk, the only thing that seemed to save me was opening my mouth and speaking in my then-higher register. The mugger went on to shoot two other men in similar circumstances, and even the DA seemed to think that this body I’d rebelled against my entire life was what allowed me to live.
David

While common-or-garden varieties of incompetence can’t be ruled out, it does fairly reek of a carefully managed dishonesty.

The fact that different demographics often have differing aggregate inclinations, is, for some, terribly problematic. Something to be fixed, indignantly, while pretending it isn’t true.

It’s a dance that involves pinheads. In both senses.

WTP

Curious how this story happened in the real world but for some reason I'm only hearing of it now, yet the stupid book by the rapist and sociopath William Golding was beat into my head, by mostly women and beta men, growing up.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/may/09/the-real-lord-of-the-flies-what-happened-when-six-boys-were-shipwrecked-for-15-months

David
We got a lot of culture largely based on the “sad self-knowledge” of people who were psychological and moral outliers — social and moral losers, as I say — but who fancied themselves representative of humanity and who managed to sell that self-justifying delusion to the rest of society. The costs were significant.

Glenn Reynolds, here.

It may also to some extent explain why the pages of Slate, Salon, New York, Everyday Feminism, and of course the Guardian, are so often filled with personal issues that are framed as normal and commonplace, but which sound decidedly marginal and a tad degenerate.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Empowering new game, Ms. Monopoly.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

"Those who do not study history are doomed to write garbage for the Guardian".

Ted S, Catskill Mtns, NY, USA
French, Italian, German,

[ Raises eyebrow.]

Our neck of the woods had a fair amount of German immigration (Grandpa was a butcher from Bavaria), so up through the last generation there were still a couple of German restaurants and such. I think Deising's, founded by a German immigrant in the mid-60s (who had his German pastry chef Urkunde up on the wall the last time I checked) is the only one left, and they've diversified.

There's more out in the US Midwest which got a lot more German immigration.

David

“Those who do not study history are doomed to write garbage for the Guardian”

Poor Zoe. She finds “Britishness,” and almost any sense of national affirmation – including, no doubt, my elderly neighbours’ flags and bunting - both “regressive” and “nauseating.”

It occurs to me that Zoe’s sorrows may relate to Glenn Reynolds’ point, linked upthread.

Sam Duncan

“Those who do not study history are doomed to write garbage for the Guardian”

TL;DR: Commemorating the heroism of our ancestors is so, like, boring and ugh, you're all embarrasing, and I wanna go hang with my cool mates 'kthnxbye.

Sam Duncan

But you know what really grinds my gears about articles like Williams'? The very same Guardian types will bugger off to foreign parts and gawp at other countries celebrating their ancient “monocultures” - Greeks goose-stepping about dressed for all the world like Morrismen, African tribal war dances - then come home an gush about how terribly authentic it all is.

You want “authentic”? My late father watched refugees walk down the main street of his town in their nightclothes the morning after the Clydebank blitz. British refugees, practically his neighbours, left with nothing by a foreign government with a Big Idea. I want to celebrate the fact that we, Britain, America, and the Commonwealth, overcame that shit, dammit.

David

Commemorating the heroism of our ancestors is so, like, boring and ugh, you’re all embarrassing, and I wanna go hang with my cool mates

Heh. That. The pouty teen mindset tarted up as woke politics. And Zoe, being so clever, so much smarter than, for instance, my elderly neighbours, doesn’t seem to comprehend how the sentiment she disdains is a rather important part of the social substructure on which her own comfort depends.

David

The very same Guardian types will bugger off to foreign parts and gawp at other countries celebrating their ancient “monocultures”

Indeed. But Zoe’s tiresome parroting isn’t arrived at via any kind of autonomous mental activity, or with any standards to speak of. I doubt she feels any obligation to be accurate or realistic or reciprocal or self-consistent. We’ve seen the spiteful, baldly incoherent bollocks she churns out.

Let’s not forget her belief that giving money away “creates inequality,” or her claim that even moderate exercise makes you rightwing. Oh, and we mustn’t forget Zoe’s delight in devising elaborate humiliations for parents who can no longer afford to give their children an education as comfortable as Zoe’s own, details of which she carefully omits, and in which, extracurricular activities included visits to Rome and Morocco and an eight-day tour of Barbados. Because she cares so very much.

There are no meaningful standards in any of this, no probity. It’s just an attempt to conform with her in-group, thereby accruing status, while rationalising the nasty posturing of her inner adolescent. Which, on reflection, is a large part of modern leftism. Pretty much its core.

Hal

French, Italian, German,

[ Raises eyebrow.]

[ Glares across Channel. ]

The MLF Lullaby.

Hal

Who's on first.

Darleen

Happy Mother's Day!

Circa 1960, my mom (still going strong at 88 y/o!) back when Las Vegas was still geared to the adults in the room.

Smallish Bees

In my stupider days, which is saying something, I brought my espresso machine to work so I would not spend so much money in cafes. I basically would make an espresso drink, finish it, then make another. I might have been drinking tennis Brussels are cappuccinos in a work day. So I shorted out my nervous system, and trained it to give me an existential crisis every time I drink a cup of coffee.

then I switched to tea, but my family's tea was aged old lipton's that have been up in the cupboard since I was born, and was only ever drunk medicinally. With a metric ton of sugar and milk to cut the horrid bitterness.

went to college and met a real tea drinker, who introduced me to Darjeeling, and my world changed. Finally I have found something I could drink, but actually had magical anti asthmatic properties, and which would not make me into a crazy person.

So even though this is a particularly anti-Chinese period we are living in, and for good reason, I have come to like there style of tea drinking the best.

Gongfu tea means that it is carefully prepared. The British, in my observation, drink tea culturally. They like the wake up, but even more they like the tradition and connection it gives them with their British identity. And so you will find tea connoisseurs going to the UK, and will have tea lovey shop on beautiful china with fantastic little sandwiches with watercress, but the tea itself is bog-standard tea served in tepid water.

The Japanese drink tea, as part of a religion of aesthetics. But the actual tea they drink doesn't taste that good. When you read Japanese tea blogs, they always focus on the ceremony, and very very little on getting the highest quality tea leaves. One can find amazing matcha and sencha teas, but that's not usually the point of the tea ceremony as we've come to understand it. In fact, matcha tea is often made in China, but I would never drink it, because of the danger of lead and Mercury and other metals.

Taiwan has an absolutely insane tea culture, and it is not unheard of to buy a $2,000 pot of tea for lunch. They're the ones who have refined the tea process even further than anyone's ever seen. It's amazing.

All of American tea culture, the less said, the better.

But I love the Chinese gongfu style, because they take easily as much care and energy to make their tea as the Japanese too, but without all the doilies that you would expect in British tea. They make huge messes, splash water all over the place, clatter their dishes and teaware incessantly, all in a goal to get the best tasting cup you can possibly find.

And the results make me realize why people drink tea. I am no expert or tea Master, but I really do enjoy the enormous variety of teas that the world has to offer.

No milk and no sugar, of course. And for heaven's sake, please do not offer me chocolate souffle raspberry flavored tea. Trustee. Camellia sinensis sinensis is good enough for me.

And purchased in bulk, it is way cheaper per cup than the garbage we have on our grocery shelves. Find me a good tea sorcerer can give you things that you can re steep a half a dozen times and still be flavorful.

Smallish Bees

Terribly sorry about the typos. Voice to text is not my friend.

Smallish Bees

I had meant, tea sourcer. But tea sorcerer has a nice ring to it.

Steve E

[...] back when Las Vegas was still geared to the adults in the room.

...and people dressed up! No raggedy-ass jeans on the casino floor.

Look at your mom. Dressed to kill playing the nickel slots.

David

Terribly sorry about the typos. Voice to text is not my friend.

Ah. Whew. I thought I was having some kind of aphasic seizure.

David

Dressed to kill playing the nickel slots.

If anyone’s getting aroused by Darleen’s mom, I’m upping the price of the drinks.

TimT

"Those who do not study history are doomed to write garbage for the Guardian".

A lefty acquaintance proclaimed online yesterday that VE Day marked ‘no victory’ though there was a victory ‘militarily’, which really makes you wonder WTF WWII was if not a ‘military’ occurrence. He teaches history....

Lady Cutekitten of Lolcat

The only 2 teas I’ve ever tried that I didn’t like were Earl Grey and Lapsang Souchong. For all I know LS tastes great; I couldn’t get past the wet-bandaid smell.

Happy Mothers Day! Get off the Internet and go make Mom some good tea in the prettiest pot the family has.

Fred the Fourth

So... How many cappuccinos are "tennis Brussels are"?

I grew up in California in the 60s, so even Earl Grey in Surrey at age 16 was a revelation.
But then I went to UC Berkeley and hung out with overseas Chinese and ABC, and then there was my wife, and the trip to PRC in about 1995, and now our place is literally stuffed with little pouches of excellent tea.
But...our morning drink is Sumatra coffee.
Go figure.

Chester Draws

Happy Mothers Day!

The USA has multiple timezones, yet USAians still struggle to come to grips with the concept the rest of the world lives at different times. I could understand the Chinese who all have the same timezone not remembering, but those with internal ones?

By the time you posted that, Britons would have had to wake their mothers up to make them a cup of tea still on Sunday. I meanwhile am starting to think of lunch. On Monday. (I did go round an see my Mum yesterday though.)

One of the features of receiving international visitors in NZ is you have to be really careful you know which day they are arriving. People set off on a 10 hour flight on Monday evening from the Americas and assume they will land Tuesday. I've known several families go to the airport a day early because of that error. One of my great aunts made the opposite mistake, because she flew via Asia, and arrived the day before the one she told us to pick her up at. Leaving her stranded at the airport.

WTP

A lefty acquaintance proclaimed online yesterday that VE Day marked ‘no victory’ though there was a victory ‘militarily’, which really makes you wonder WTF WWII was if not a ‘military’ occurrence. He teaches history....

This is how academics indicate how smart and virtuous they are. By saying stupid things that are significantly indefensible. Your inability to see how they are thinking outside the box shows how right they really are. It's The Emperor's Clothes. Just as with the American Civil War not being about slavery. It's a gaslighting. You, dear student, will write down on the test what we tell you. And if teacher tells you WWII was not a victory for the Allies, well that's what you write down and shut up about it. Dummy.

Chester Draws

Well, WWII wasn't a total victory for the US and Britain, because the Soviets ended up taking and holding Eastern Europe. I wonder if that was what he meant?

TimT

All that verbiage could be condensed to 7 words:

“I hate men so I became one.”

Yup. Makes sense to me. I’ll grant she or he or whatever is justified in holding a long grudge against the mugger.

I don't mind people coming up with their own explanations to justify a transition - 'I'm a man in a woman's body', that sort of thing. It's their life. They have to work it out for themselves.

But transitioning, justifying their transition in terms of modish feminist ideology, and then using that to describe everyone who was just *born* male as in some way toxic? No. That's just inflicting the contradictions of your own ideology on everyone. Bugger off.

Richard Cranium

"Just as with the American Civil War not being about slavery."

That's because it wasn't.

Slavery triggered the conflict, but most of the Northern soldiers didn't give a rat's ass about the slaves.

Chester Draws

Slavery triggered the conflict, but most of the Northern soldiers didn't give a rat's ass about the slaves.

You think the British soldiers in WWII cared that much about the Poles? They went to war because they were told to. And that was because the government thought that the invasion of Poland was sufficiently worrying to react to.

In the end the American Civil War was about three main things:
1) Slavery.
2) States rights. But most specifically about the right to have slaves.
3) Whether Secession was allowed. (And they seceded so that they could continue to have slaves.)

Richard Cranium

1940s Britain is nothing like 1860s America. Not even close.

The American Civil War was about if the United States of America (and you really should pay attention to that name, because it actually meant what it said) was a Republic or an Empire.

The Confederate States of America attempted to operate as a Republic; it soon found out that an Empire (with admittedly much greater means of production of goods) could crush a loose confederation of equal states. President Lincoln took some dictatorial powers to make that happen; I don't believe that he took them lightly (unlike Woodrow Wilson or FDR) and I also don't believe that his murder was a good thing for the former states of the CSA.

As others have pointed out, the Northern states could have spent less in blood and treasure by merely a) making slavery illegal, but b) buying those enslaved at market prices prior to making slavery illegal.

Fay S Greenwood

Tea without milk is uncivilized

Ray

You can eat a "full English breakfast" anywhere in the world that has Englishmen. The true Englishman will then sustain himself for the remainder of the day on alcohol. That is why there are no English restaurants. Thank you.

Governor Squid

I switched from coffee to tea about ten or eleven years ago, after too much of the free stuff at work started doing a number on my moods, my sleep patterns, and my stomach health. The tea habit has proven to be much gentler.

I started on Darjeeling as well, but graduated to Assam after the former started tasting too grassy for me. I like the warm malty flavo(u)rs of Assam quite a lot. We're blessed to have a really delightful tea sorcerer in St. Paul, so I get to play around with lots of options. If you're looking for a mail-order option in the US, I can heartily recommend these guys.

WTP

Yeah. Forces of evil in a bozo nightmare...What Chester said but to add my NSHO...The "states rights" thing...the South's promotion of that excuse played quite conveniently into the hands of the Federal government and to some degree the 19th/20th century progressives, most dangerously the GOP ones. Once the Great Depression presented it's power grab opportunity there were enough GOP progressives on the courts to allow FDR to make the absurd Wickard v. Filburn an unanimous decision in spite of two Coolidge appointees, one being the Chief Justice. As for a "Republic", hmmm...one populated significantly by slaves, in some states the majority being slaves, kinda pushes the meaning of the word Republic. While I agree Lincoln did not take those powers lightly and that his murder was a bad thing for the South, the South did the country and itself no favors by latching on to the "states' rights" argument. By the time I was in school the gaslighting of teenagers was getting traction. And what bugs me is not just about this ACW thing, but about how the story of history of what happened during the Great Depression and certain specifics of World War II were being pushed. I'll never forget a friend of my father's working very hard to make the impression on me that when he and his fellow US troops landed in North Africa, that they were DEFINITELY taking fire from the French. Not that I doubted him but it seemed like such an important thing to this old man to make sure anyone with a sense of history understood this. And don't get me started on the French "Resistance"...ah, but I digressed...

pst314

Tea without milk is uncivilized

Cardinal Fang, the heretic Ray needs saving from error.

Steve E

As for a "Republic", hmmm...one populated significantly by slaves, in some states the majority being slaves, kinda pushes the meaning of the word Republic.

On the contrary, the original Republic in Rome was a slave state. It's estimated that 35 to 40 percent of the population of Italy during the Republic phase of Roman history were slaves.

I know what you're saying, but a "Republic" and slavery have never been mutually exclusive. Although slavery was theoretically abolished in France with the creation of the Republic, it still existed in practice and wasn't finally abolished until 1848.

WTP

I know what you're saying, but a "Republic" and slavery have never been mutually exclusive.

Well, exactly. I know what you're saying. People's Republic of China, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, (my favorite...and not just because they throw a huge celebration on my birthday there) Democratic People's Republic of North Korea. There are others.

pst314

“Hot” water? From a microwave? How did these barbarians ever end up on the moon

By not obsessing over dried leaves in boiling water?

So you are the one who programmed the Nutri-Matic drinks dispenser. Arthur Dent and I are gonna come round and program you, you bastard.

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