David Thompson
Subscribe

Categories

Blog powered by Typepad

« Their Happiness Hurt My Feelings | Main | Insufficient Kink Detected »

May 18, 2020

Comments

[+]

'Believe all women'

https://youtu.be/YMOejqbhB8A

MC

Cool installation. Seoul's a great city, not pretty but lots going on. I used to go there every now and then for business.

You know, in the old days, when we travelled...

Talking of which, here's an article by a sad, dripping-wet, sack of shit who thinks we should let the air industry die*. Because we over-reached and angered Gaia or some such.

https://unherd.com/2020/05/should-we-rescue-the-aviation-industry/

*I'm not necessarily in favour of massive bail outs, because there's capital ready to pick up the pieces of the weaker airlines. And the stronger airlines only need the world to HTFU and cease the anti-human lockdowns.

David

‘Believe all women’

To borrow from Instapundit, “Double standards are the best standards because you have twice as many as less-principled people.”

Steve E

From this: https://unherd.com/2020/05/should-we-rescue-the-aviation-industry/

"The industry has everything it needs to get off the ground again — everything but enough money, and that’s something the state can provide."

Yes, because every good lefty knows that "money" comes from the state

Jay Guevara

Yes, because every good lefty knows that "money" comes from the state

Just like electricity comes from outlets.

Steve E

Just like electricity comes from outlets.

And food comes from the grocery store.

Chester Draws

The irony is that the people most opposed to airlines and us flying lots are also the people who are most in favour of international organisations and solutions. They think people flying in thousands to Climate Change conferences is a good thing.

Meanwhile the US-deplorables and Brexit-gammon are all in favour of international flights -- because we are narrow-minded xenophobes. Apparently.

Governor Squid

They're not opposed to airlines and air travel; they're upset that these things are commodities available to the hoi polloi. They cheerfully envision a world in which there is plenty of private aviation and a handful of luxury airlines, secure in the delusion that their brilliance is so in-demand that employers, universities, and conference organizers will be queuing up to offer them all-expense-paid trips to the world's coolest cities.

Meanwhile, the People of Walmart will be stuck in their backwater villages. Where they belong!

It seems likely that hopes of widespread asymptomatic infection — and thus of achieving herd immunity — have been dashed.

In an article riddled with hyperlinks to the author's friends and favorite newspapers, there's not a single link in the assertion above. One cannot help but find the absence suspicious. Telling, even.

Fred the Fourth

Yes, the Unherd writer makes a stupid remark about state funding for airline recovery.
But most of the article poses fair arguments for why most air travel will take a very long time to recover.
The pandemic and the effects (and side effects) of mitigation policies are a big kick in the ass for lots of bits of the economy, not just travel.
I've been thinking a lot about this since I heard that real estate prices around lake Tahoe have been rising. The speculation is that folks are seeing work from home as a way to get out of the mess that is the greater sf bay area.
But if that happens there will be many other effects. My reference example is the US post ww2. Increased private auto ownership and the building of the interstate highway system enabled a huge expansion of suburbia. But also created the shopping mall, the supermarket industry, and made shipping logistics the key to Amazon's business.
Lots of rural US, for instance, does not have anything like good enough internet bandwidth yet, to support mass work from home. Does that mean big layouts for fiber? Or 5G? or something else? What might that do to competition in the telecom biz?
Google and Amazon and Microsoft already site server farms and data centers based on electricity prices and reliability. How might relocation of demand affect their economics?
So far I'm just pulling ideas out of my ass, but pretty soon I'm going to have to make some heavy decisions related to all this. As are many of us.

Governor Squid

Google and Amazon and Microsoft already site server farms and data centers based on electricity prices and reliability. How might relocation of demand affect their economics?

It's further complicated because both sides will adjust their decision-making.* People won't simply abandon the big cities willy-nilly -- they'll be looking for alternatives that meet their personal want lists, whether it be high-quality Internet and wireless service, decent coffee, lovely scenery, nice housing options, or whatever.

Will people choose a refuge that requires an extra day or two for delivery time from Amazon? Having made that decision, will they care if it takes Amazon a number of years to tweak their logistics to allow for faster delivery to a "remote" location?

It would be interesting to see how the push-and-pull all works out.

* Assuming this crisis has a bigger influence than SARS, MERS, and 9/11.

Fred the Fourth

I know someone who coordinates peer advising among small company CEOs, and CxOs / SVPs of large companies, and they are now spending a lot of time on these issues. So far, it seems most are focussed on short-term tactics to survive the next year. Long term strategy is not on the table much yet.

Jeff Guinn

“You know, in the old days, when we travelled...

Talking of which, here's an article by a sad, dripping-wet, sack of shit who thinks we should let the air industry die*. Because we over-reached and angered Gaia or some such.”

Progressives hate humanity, whilst processing love for the common man.

Thought experiment: let the airlines die.

Hawaii. What happens to virtually everyone who lives there? Mass starvation, or forced resettlement? Caribbean islands, Tahiti, Adriatic coast (if you don’t think tourism isn’t helping the various Balkans from each other’s throats isn’t paying attention) und so weiter.

Airlines enable epic redistribution of wealth.

And those DWSOS’s are relying on the same kind of farcical modeling making Mao Tse Lung so totes WEAREALLGOINGTODIE!!

Jeff Guinn

... professing ...

Typing on a mobile device so totes sux.

Steve E

Progressives hate humanity, whilst professing love for the common man.

"whilst professing love for [the idea of] the common man." FTFY

They actually hate individuals especially if they're common. Like their hero Marx they hate the proletariat and view peasants as less than human and therefore expendable.

Uma Thurmond's Feet

Watched Frank Capra's "Meet John Doe" a few nights ago. No particular reason; we git it years ago, and now that the libraries are closed we're going through the home DVD collection in alphabetical order.

The movie takes place in 1941, before Pearl Harbor, and the Depression still hangs over America.

Barbara Stanwyck plays a newspaper columnist just fired by the new owner, a plutocrat who wants the paper as his personal mouthpiece. For her last column, she makes up a suicide note from an angry "John Doe". John Doe threatens to jump off the City Hall roof Christmas eve because he can't live with all the evil around him.

Column causes an uproar, and newspaper boss hires her back and tells her to find a "John Doe" and keep feeding the public populist anger because it boosts circulation.

Gary Cooper comes in, a baseball pitcher with a busted wing. He agrees he'll play John if they'll pay a surgeon to fix his arm so he can play again. He signs a contract to that effect.

His speeches (written by her) sparks a populist wave among the "John Does" of America (read: deplorables). They form clubs, get in touch with neighbors and help each other out. They even hold a convention for people to come from across the country to honor him and the John Doe movement

Just before he goes down to the stadium, visits the newspaper owner's mansion. Standing out of sight outside the dining room where Barbara Stanwyck sits with a new fur coat and jeweled necklace, he hears the owner announce to his fellow plutocrats that John Doe will announce to the crowd that he's going to form a third political party and he'll endorse the newspaper owner for president.

Cooper walks in, steam coming out his ears. Barbara Stanwyck is appalled, but he believes she was in the plot all the time. He lays into the plutocrats, and says he'll tell the crowd the truth.

Newspaper owner says go ahead, we'll ruin you.

He goes down to the stadium to speak to the people, but as he reaches the microphone, the newspaper's goons distribute free newspapers denouncing Cooper as a fraud who never intended to jump off the roof of City Hall. They publish the contract he signed. The publisher races to the podium and denounces Cooper. Cooper tries to speak, but the publisher's goons cut the wires and stops him.

As the police hustle him out, the crowd turns on him and throws stuff at him.

Cooper goes up on the roof on a snowy Christmas eve. The plutocrats are there too, to make sure he doesn't jump (publisher tells him the police are below, and if he jumps, they'll remove his ID and dump his body into Potter's Field). Stanwyck reaches the roof and pleads with him to keep fighting.

He's still determined, but some of the common people (who we met earlier in the movie) show up. They confess they were carried away, saw the good he was doing, and plead with him to keep fighting.

He agrees. Happy ending.

The movie was pretty good, although a bit long for my taste. There's flag waving and we're treated to the sight of a priest at the stadium calling for an opening [silent] prayer, which I haven't seen in a dog's age.

Only thing is, I keep getting the feeling that this reminds me of something, but for the life of me I can't put my finger on it.

Hal

With a recent discussion elsewhere regarding arranging and delivering data, I noted to some others that an opposing declarative reply of You. Are. Eeeeeevil!!!!!! does have far fewer syllables and allows a much greater emotional emphasis than announcing that This demonstration of proven reality is entirely orthogonal to my received orthodoxy.

Of which . . .

Received Orthodoxy

Band name.

For that matter; Greater Emotional Emphasis

---G.E.E. would have an operatic opening act called The Screaming Mimis.

Chester Draws

G.E.E. would have an operatic opening act called The Screaming Mimis.

You've spelled their name wrong, and they are getting a bit old now : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screaming_Meemees

They were never very good, although apparently OK live.

Hal

You've spelled their name wrong . . .

Heh!

In this case, though, with the operatic focus, it'd be the Mimis . . .

David
“Agnes, did you shrink his prostate?”

In culture news, Mr Plinkett reviews Star Trek: Picard.

TimT

Re: the Unherd article.

It's much easier for people on the European continent to talk about closing down aviation, I find. They're situated right in the middle of the continent that developed the first form of mass transportation; trains criss-cross the entire land mass. And it is *fulll* of tiny nations right up against one another.

Not so in Australia. The nation may have been settled and colonised by the heirs of that European wealth and technological prowess, but precious little of that wealth made its way over here. And we don't have the agricultural richness to support anywhere near the sort of population density that you have in Europe. Australia is *vast*. Several of our states and territories can pack the whole land mass of western Europe in their borders - while the nation as a whole has a population size similar to that of the UK.

So you can imagine that affordable air travel is kinda crucial to us.

An abandonment of the air travel option would, inevitably, see whole generations of our best and brightest leave on ships to Europe, just like the expat Boomer generation, many never to come home again.

Air travel may seem an unnecessary luxury when you can just pop on the train to go through the tunnel to France in the morning. In Australia, it's pretty freaking important.

MC

It's much easier for people on the European continent to talk about closing down aviation

Yep, they think they'll be swanning around on the Eurostar and TGV. Which of course are not long metal boxes full of people and their germs, oh no.

I live in Asia and for those with pan-Asian businesses, the only option is to fly. And of course, fuck necessity, we want to fly because we want to explore new places and have fun! I sincerely hope that, once the dust has settled, even the terminally stupid (ie politicians and civil servants) will realise there's no point in closing down air travel because of a disease that basically only kills you if you're half dead already.

BTW Australia's population is actually less than half that of the UK.

John D

“Agnes, did you shrink his prostate?”

Lol. Marathon but worth it.

David

Marathon but worth it.

Yes, it’s long, but at times quite pointed. I like the shots of the writers and producers congratulating themselves on how uplifting and sophisticated the series supposedly is, juxtaposed with the wildly incoherent nihilistic shitshow they actually threw together.

Also, “Why make an android that looks like a terrible actress?”

TimT

BTW Australia's population is actually less than half that of the UK.

Haha yes, I got that number from a Robert Hughes show I'd seen two decades ago, and didn't bother checking it, just thought, 'yeah, that'll do'. I knew we weren't talking big numbers anyway.

And yes. We want that freedom in Australia, too, to actually be able to fly places, have fun, see the world. If COVID and climate change activism combined made this impossible and we all were confined to our own corner of the world forever it'd be a damn shame - it'd be a cultural disaster, actually.

Sam Duncan

“'whilst professing love for [the idea of] the common man.' FTFY”

As I often say, they profess an affinity with The People in the abstract, but have a bit of a problem with actual, living, breathing, people.

(With Scottish Nationalists, for “people” read “nation” throughout.)

Adam

I fully agree with Uma Thurmond's Feet that we seem to be living in a movie we've seen before but can't quite remember what it was.

I still get Howard's End(1992) mixed up with Remains of the Day(1993) because they both star Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, were directed by James Ivory, and written by Ruth Jhabvala.

Likewise with Pelosi, Schumer, Schiff, and Shinola. We get remakes of the Remains of Howard's End Days repetitively, over and over, etc.

Sam

Anyone get the coof coof test yet? Got one today for some “elective” (not synonymous with “optional” I’ve learned). Typical flu test that wasn’t too bad. However I must pay for a chest X-ray, which my surgeon explained is now being done to make double sure I’m not asymptotic. The X-ray isn’t expensive and the risks are known, however my surgeon reassuring me that he bases his treatments on often held worldwide medical webinar things, and that “Beijing” found that X-rays helped detect cases, was not as comforting as perhaps the Dr was expecting. I likely made a face, though with everyone in masks, who’s to know?

sH2

"Changing the face of journalism'...

https://www.shondaland.com/live/money/a32480331/5-women-changing-the-face-of-journalism/

David

“Changing the face of journalism”

Apparently, it’s possible to hail the “extraordinary talent” and – wait for it - the “honesty” of chronic fabulist Laurie Penny, and to regurgitate her trite vanities without challenge of any kind – while simultaneously being hurt, even puzzled, by the fact that public regard for the media is at a fifty-year low.

Steve E

"Changing the face of journalism'...

A great summary of what's wrong with "journalism." A travel writer writes a piece in a special interest/advocacy magazine and selects four women writers, a celebrity profiler (don't we call them gossip columnists?), a columnist/wannabe screen writer, a non-fiction author/radio feature presenter, a culture writer, plus one woman who is actually a white house reporter. She then tells us that these are brave front-liners "running towards the fire."

She tells us the goal of these heroes is:

...helping inform and educate people so that they can make better choices about their own lives...
because according to a Pulitzer Prize Administrator (wot?), not an actual Pulitzer Prize Winner mind you, that "journalism never stops."

Like so many other words, journalism clearly doesn't mean what it once did. And this piece is an illustration of Poe's law especially when you dig deeper into the "journalism" each of these women practices. Being a writer doesn't make you a journalist, especially when so much of what you write is your own excreted opinion. I'm surprised news consumers' trust is as high as 41%.

David

helping inform and educate people so that they can make better choices about their own lives...

I’ll just leave this here, shall I?

Richard Cranium

BTW Australia's population is actually less than half that of the UK.

Many many moons ago (late 1980s, to be less imprecise), when I was at the Signal Officer Advanced Course, we had an Australian Warrant Officer give a class. He mentioned that he always wanted to drive down motor pool road at Fort Hood, Texas. Why? He wanted to see what the Australian Army would look like when it was fully mobilized.

That's not a beat down on the Australians, BTW. Huge place to defend with not that large of a population (~25M which is smaller than what the US had in 1860); any military that takes defending that space with so few people seriously would push for nukes, to be honest.

Richard Cranium

Now in her thirties, that promise has led Alcindor to cover the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and the 2915 shooting at Mother Emanuel Church in Charleston, South Carolina for USA Today, The New York Times, and NBC.

Layers of fact checkers and editors. Layers, I say.

Steve E

I’ll just leave this here, shall I?

Ms. Penny running towards the fire. I wonder what the Assistant Pullitzer Prize Administrator would have to say?

Sue Sims

From the introduction: "To celebrate their contributions made by journalists, we gathered five extraordinarily women in the field to discuss how they continue to bring us the most important stories."

It would be nice if a Top (presumably) Journalist (presumably) could actually write English.

WTP

In the interest of "open thread"...One of these days I’m gonna write a book about doing carpentry in a whorehouse. Imma call it “The Studs Don’t Have To Go All The Way Up”.

Steve E

One of these days I’m gonna write a book about doing carpentry in a whorehouse.

Funny you should say that. I was gonna write a book about running a business that goes bankrupt operating on the floor below a whorehouse. Imma call it "Too Much F***ing Overhead".

Hal

Funny you should say that.

American beer is a little like making love inna canoe.

Squires

Like so many other words, journalism clearly doesn't mean what it once did.

Those who now call themselves journalists are so often no more than courtiers-for-hire.

Steve E

Those who now call themselves journalists are so often no more than courtiers-for-hire.

I went to journalism school from 1978 to 1982. Many of my instructors were in their prime as journalists in the 1950s and 1960s. Those that weren't were still active in the field and there was a marked difference between how they saw things and the how the old guard saw things.

Most of the old guard have since passed away. I can only imagine them spinning in their graves. And those with the highest rpm's would be the ones who were story editors and copy editors. Those are jobs that really don't seem to exist anymore.

Most journalists are crappy writers with short attention spans who just want to write it and get it printed. The editors cleaned up the garbage, removed what didn't make sense or couldn't be proved. They stopped the reporter from becoming the centre of the story. They pushed for more information when necessary and they made the story readable.

Those instructors who were still working in the field were sloppier, less principled and less disciplined. They wiped out what the old guard had been teaching and are responsible for the undisciplined, narcissistic rubbish which their students publish today.

The business doesn't even call it news anymore. It's content. Well garbage in, garbage out keeps the sausage factory in business.

Richard Cranium

American beer is a little like making love inna canoe.

Most current American beer drinkers view Foster's as not much better than water.

That's an opinion that I share about Foster's Lager (blue can). I happen to be partial to Foster's Premium Ale (green can), but there's a large segment of the American beer drinker population that would claim that it's close to Foster's Lager in taste.

svh

“Changing the face of journalism”

Related.

https://twitter.com/RealJamesWoods/status/1262445915014524928

Hal

Most current American beer drinkers view Foster's as not much better than water.

I find the taste of alcohol to be utterly ghastly, so I don't drink any, but according to a reply to advertising that I've seen here and there:

Fosters: Australian for Bud.

Then again, for advertising slogans and brewing, there is also:

Budweiser: America's finest really bad sake!

David

It would be nice if a Top (presumably) Journalist (presumably) could actually write English.

Journalism’s goal of helping inform and educate people so that they can make better choices about their own lives is a task that’s become increasingly harder…

Increasingly harder.

But hey, it’s all terribly, terribly radical, and that’s what matters.

TimT

No Australian drinks Fosters.

That’s the rubbish megabrew the Carlton United Breweries use in the international markets.

There are much nicer craft brews locally - and hopefully will remain so once this awful lockdown finally ends.

Bob

Curiously, war history experts have suggested that the Japanese forces (1941-45) even at their strongest could not have held Australia, simply because the island is so enormous, with uninhabitable deserts blocking pathways (unless you're a local).
Supply lines (rail & road) would be impossible, and can be eliminated by Australia in the event of invasion. Air distances make the logistics a nightmare, and with 22,000 miles of coastline, an occupying force would find their occupation indefensible. Nature wins in the end. If China has silly ideas, the best advice is, don't bother.

Charlie Suet

C.S. Lewis in 1924 wrote of Macaulay that “He has the journalist's air of being a specialist in everything, of taking in all points of view and being always on the side of the angels: he merely annoys a reader who has the least experience of knowing things, of what knowing is like.” The criticism implied in the comparison seems very familiar.

I don’t think we should necessarily assume that journalism has ever really been a real profession. To a strong extent the internet, and twitter in particular has just exposed the enormous ignorance of the average hack. The only real journalists are those that write for an informed audience or who possess by autopsy some information that no one else could have.

That said, the apparent absence of subeditors, the complete obliteration of any distinction between tabloid and broadsheet journalism, and the tendency towards shameless advocacy and a refusal on the part of hacks to challenge their own assumptions all seem to have become increasingly common in the media over the last twenty years or so.

The timings are obviously approximate, but twenty five years ago the Guardian was a proper, if left-wing paper. Fifteen years ago it was a reasonable newspaper with an increasingly batshit comments section. Today it’s a batshit comment site that surprisingly employs some proper journalists. When I was a kid the Independent was one of the best papers around as well.

Alan Rusbridger seemed bad enough at the time - a sanctimonious, Dickensian hypocrite who spent thousands on a grand piano and waltzed into a sinecure after he left the Graun. But he seems like a proper newspaperman next to a rabid activist like Katharine Viner.

Governor Squid

Layers of fact checkers and editors. Layers, I say.

No comment on the big bold underlined link to the "Gallop Poll" in the second sentence?

I swear, these silly bints self-parody so effortlessly that I sometimes think I should admire their artfulness. Then I come to my senses, and just point and laugh.

NateWhilk

Since Charlie Suet has brought up that C. S. Lewis quote, I'll give some more of my favorites on the same subject.

"Everything you read in the newspapers is absolutely true—except for the rare story of which you happen to have firsthand knowledge."
—Knoll's Law of Media Accuracy (Erwin Knoll, editor, "The Progressive")

"...it was the first time that I had seen a person whose profession was telling lies—unless one counts journalists."
—George Orwell, "Homage to Catalonia" (1938)

"It is a melancholy truth, that a suppression of the press could not more completely deprive the nation of its benefits, than is done by its abandoned prostitution to falsehood."
—Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Norvell (June 11, 1807)
Read the whole thing. TL;DR: he DESTROYS them (and he's not complimentary to us readers, either). https://www.loc.gov/resource/mtj1.038_0592_0594/?sp=2&st=text

"I deplore with you the putrid state into which our newspapers have passed, and the malignity, the vulgarity, & mendacious spirit of those who write for them [...] As vehicles of information, and a curb on our functionaries they have rendered themselves useless by forfeiting all title to belief. That this has in a great degree been produced by the violence and malignity of party spirit I agree with you [...]"
—Thomas Jefferson, letter to Walter Jones (January 2, 1814)
https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/03-07-02-0052

“Why you fool, it’s the educated reader who *can* be gulled. All our difficulty comes with the others. When did you meet a workman who believes the papers? [...] *He* is our problem. We have to recondition him. But the educated public, the people who read the highbrow weeklies, don’t need reconditioning. They’re all right already. They’ll believe anything.”
—C. S. Lewis, "That Hideous Strength", ch. 5, part 1

pst314

twenty five years ago the Guardian was a proper, if left-wing paper. Fifteen years ago it was a reasonable newspaper with an increasingly batshit comments section.

Even when I first started reading blogs in the late 90's the Guardian was mockingly called the Grauniad.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name is required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Blogroll