David Thompson
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August 14, 2020

Comments

Steve E

an excellent use of the buttocks.

I can assure you the neoprene suit is needed for that manoeuver. In a regular bathing suit you'd get a deep water enema. Speaking from experience.

Bat discotheque caught on camera.

Pretty sure I went to that club in 1978.

Rethink of note.

Awfully nice of Sam Gagner to give the kid his stick considering he was wearing the opposing team's jersey.

NTSOG

@ Steve: "I can assure you the neoprene suit is needed for that manoeuver. In a regular bathing suit you'd get a deep water enema."

Unfortunately my neoprene ski-suit, when bare-footing on Big Stone Lake in Three Lakes, Wis. in 1980 had, unknown to me, sprung some stitches in the nether regions and I did get flushed when finishing my run by throwing back to slide to a halt.

JuliaM

"Burbles, can be stroked, and doesn’t poop."

It's a Tribble. They've invented a Tribble, haven't they?

Dan

Was anyone arrested in Portland who wasn't trans? What the hell?

David

Morning, all.

Was anyone arrested in Portland who wasn’t trans?

The above is a tiny snapshot of the phenomenon and Andy Ngo has previously remarked on the prevalence of trans individuals among Antifa. It’s an interesting concentration, much higher than chance alone would seem to allow. I suspect that if you subtracted the people with gender identity issues, unattractive facial tattoos, and/or cluster B personality disorders, Antifa would probably fit in the back of a small car.

Connor

He’s bad.

That's brilliant.

David

That’s brilliant.

It’s just wrong enough to work, I think.

David

Pretty sure I went to that club in 1978.

It does evoke the goth contingent of several clubs I stumbled around as a yoot; the dancefloor sticky with beer, and the air thick with industrial-strength hair lacquer.

Jonathan

Non-essential component detected.

Is it too late to ask for a refund?

Jonathan

This Bird gets about a bit.

via Byzantine Emporia

asiaseen

The Theragun Elite PR team knows how to disappoint. See it in action they proudly proclaim. Yes, I admit, I was expecting to see a nubile wench or muscled hunk "relaxing" to the gun's soothing vibration...

Joan

Today's word is 'harsh'.

https://twitter.com/harvardgraduat/status/1293660367772516352

PiperPaul

sprung some stitches in the nether regions and I did get flushed

I think this is what the kids mean when they say TMI.

PiperPaul

This Bird gets about a bit.

The Caspian Sea Monster must have scared it away for part of that time, based on the flight path record.

David

Is it too late to ask for a refund?

No refunds. Credit note only.

David

I think this is what the kids mean when they say TMI.

Hey, we’re forward-thinking, enlightened types here. We don’t judge.

[ Opens file marked NTSOG, adds suspected deviant. ]

PiperPaul

Sent 50 quidses to fund NTSOG. Is that something like an X-File or have I unknowingly contributed to my own oppression?

David

Sent 50 quidses…

Bless you, sir. May your enemies’ grocery deliveries rarely, if ever, arrive at the promised time, and always with disappointing substitutions.

TimT

I see your bat disco and raise you an eldritch sacrificial rite:

https://www.classicfm.com/composers/stravinsky/rite-of-spring-teletubbies/

Kevin B

If your memory serves you well, this might be a good tune for your non=essential component.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b6aJrPbeBfg

David
“The contempt [for the white working class] has become much more overt.”

An interview with author Michael Collins.

Steve E

..the dancefloor sticky with beer,...

In the club I'm thinking about, there was a back room that had never been cleaned where a crusty pint glass stood on a lonely, filthy table. I picked up the glass and the whole table came with it; and it was a heavy table. The club was called Nuts and Bolts and was very Punk/New Wave, where everyone was "Dancing with themselves."

Kind of like this place. ;p

David

Kind of like this place.

Cans of hair lacquer and wraps of bad speed are available at the bar. Ask for Big Sheila.

Just don’t mention her teeth.

sk60

Caption competition?

https://twitter.com/GarbyJooman2020/status/1294155166774489089

Steve E

Caption competition?

I can see skin. Stone her!

aelfheld
It's a Tribble. They've invented a Tribble, haven't they?

Guard your grain bins.

Squires

...the dancefloor sticky with beer,...

My most frequented drinking hole back in Jersey had flooring you stuck to in summer. It was carpeted.

pst314

Flying train, 1902.

That reminds me of a funny story told many years ago by the sf writer Larry Niven, known for his serious attention to science: Someone remarked to him that the writer Richard Lupoff had made serious criticisms of the science in Lupoff's most recent story was "Sacred Locomotive Flies", at which point Niven laughed and gave no further thought to the matter.

pst314

Arrgh: that should have been "...made serious criticisms of the science in one of Niven's stories. When Niven asked who Lupoff was, he was told that Lupoff's most recent story was 'Sacred Locomotive Flies'..."

Darleen

Caption competition?

The Biden mask mandate.

Sam

Caption competition?

Mahmoud's selfie was photo-bombed. RIP, Mahmoud, you will be missed.

Daniel Ream

Larry Niven, known for his serious attention to science

Ehhh. I lost a lot of respect for him after I read "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex".

WTP

Caption competition?

Anybody remember that time...that time when I was younger and grew a beard and took a selfie with these three hot chicks? Shh...don't tell my wife...

Trevor

In the club I'm thinking about, there was a back room that had never been cleaned where a crusty pint glass stood on a lonely, filthy table.

In the establishments I used to frequent a 'back room' signified something quite different. It's a miracle I've managed to remain so vestal and unblemished.

pst314

Ehhh. I lost a lot of respect for him after I read "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex".

Why?

pst314

Mahmoud's selfie was photo-bombed. RIP, Mahmoud, you will be missed.

Some random interviewer: What can you tell us about the Beirut explosion?
Achmed the Dead Terrorist: New guy.

David

In the establishments I used to frequent a ‘back room’ signified something quite different.

I did once visit a club with what I suppose could be described as a shagging mezzanine.

FlynPigRanch

Caption Contest.

Mamhoud trades three of his wives for an acre of corn. Great trade!!

Steve E

I did once visit a club with what I suppose could be described as a shagging mezzanine.

I've been told there was a bar in my city that once had something called the "slurpee bar"--and it wasn't the 7/11 if you know what I mean.

Killer Marmot

The Canucks stick giver must have been Sam Gagner from 2019-2019. No one else has worn that number recently. They traded him.

TimT

“I did once visit a club with what I suppose could be described as a shagging mezzanine.”

Opera’s never been the same since they went out of fashion.

Captain Nemo

In the establishments I used to frequent a 'back room' signified something quite different.

I did once visit a club with what I suppose could be described as a shagging mezzanine.

I've been told there was a bar in my city that once had something called the "slurpee bar"--and it wasn't the 7/11 if you know what I mean.

I'm beginning to think I've led a very sheltered and boring life.

Steve E

The Canucks stick giver must have been Sam Gagner from 2019-2019.

Beat you to it. See first comment in the thread.

TimT

” Caption competition?”

Number two, just this once, can we get a nice family photo where everyone is smiling?

Richard Cranium

Ehhh. I lost a lot of respect for him after I read "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex".

To pile on with @pst314, why?

Maybe that predated https://larryniven.fandom.com/wiki/Rishathra in Ringworld, but nonetheless...

Richard Cranium

I'm beginning to think I've led a very sheltered and boring life.

I'm rather glad that I've been able to not internalize the many things that lead you to write that comment, despite my knowledge of their existence.

Richard Cranium

And since I'm being annoying, I can (sadly) validate "@Steve E" and @NTSOG comments about landing anus first on the water while water skiing.

In my case, someone drove a boat between me and the boat pulling me whilst I was water skiing. The waves generated by the interloper caused me to fly into the air and thus land upon my fourth point of contact while being pulled by the boat that allowed me to water ski in the first place at the same rate.

I was simultaneously negatively and exceedingly surprised by the rush of lake water into my lower bowel.

For those of you who might wonder, it was Belton Lake in ~1985 when those horrible events happened. (https://tpwd.texas.gov/fishboat/fish/recreational/lakes/belton/access.phtml for current details, despite their limited relevance to today.)

Richard Cranium

...despite their limited relevance to today

That should read ...despite their limited relevance today to those horrible events of yesteryear.

I think you should be able to guess the level of PTSD from such a horror by my inability to accurately describe the events.

hopes nobody sees the shifty eyes

Clam

shagging mezzanine

Band name.

David

Band name.

I think it could be improved - even more - by adding the definite article – The Shagging Mezzanine. Like The Cocteau Twins or The Teardrop Explodes.

To make it classy, like.

David

Heh.

Via Julia.

Jonathan

No children were harmed during the making of this music Video.

via Count Dankula

Nikw211

Heh

Somewhat related, I think - a well-known writer, broadcaster, journalist, lecturer, and senior editor at Novara Media speaks:

This makes me wonder what she would consider to be a fair advantage.

Or whether indeed she simply considers any and all advantages to be unfair by definition, which I suspect is much more likely the case.

And in this particular instance, she seems to be going even further and suggesting that sending your children to a private school is equivalent to bribing a corrupt official.

It leads to a rather mean, spiteful somewhat cartoonish view of the children themselves.

Having been educated at a large state comprehensive school myself, it seems to me that the main advantage of a private over a state school has nothing to do with facilities or with the quality of the teaching staff (and certainly nothing to do with 'buying' A grades) but more in who the other children are and how they behave.

In other words, the real difference between private and state schools, the one that makes it worth paying for if you can afford it, is that the former is primarily focussed on schooling whereas the latter isn't - a private school does what it says on the tin - it schools; a state school, eh, maybe not so much.

State comprehensives invariably find themselves charged with trying to become community centres, or holding pens for juvenile delinquents, or social care centres for children with sometimes very disturbing home lives.

State comprehensives also tend to fall prey to becoming experimental sites for whatever social justice policy happens to be most in vogue that year.

When state schools fail, it's rarely because of a lack of funding but more often because they are overburdened with multiple social and political missions, often contradictory and none of which have anything directly to do with actually delivering an education, impressed on them from outside actors.

That means it doesn't actually have to be private to succeed in being a school - it just has to be left alone to be one.

David
Having been educated at a large state comprehensive school myself, it seems to me that the main advantage of a private over a state school has nothing to do with facilities or with the quality of the teaching staff (and certainly nothing to do with ‘buying’ A grades) but more in who the other children are and how they behave.

That. In skywriting.

Somewhat related.

David

but more in who the other children are and how they behave.

Like so many of her ideological peers, Ms Sarkar seems to proceed from the assumption that IQ isn’t innate and an inevitable cause of social differentiation but is instead merely something that schools and teachers bestow upon a person. And so, by her thinking, all children, regardless of ability, will somehow equally benefit from, and must be subject to, the same educational processing. And which, as you say, entails ideological processing.

And like so many of her peers, she does this while seeming quite convinced of her own innate superiority, her destiny to govern the affairs of others, and to reduce their options.

Lancastrian Oik

From Spiked-: "Wokeness: old religion in a new bottle":

"What I object to is the idea that deep feeling is going to solve the race problem. Or that absurdly utopian ideas like abolishing the police are going to solve the problem. We don’t live in a utopia, and those ideas are only going to cause more problems. The Elect has not been called upon to be responsible. Its members are simply objecting, and they are objecting for reasons that are at least half, and probably more, emotional. Which is to say, they are only objecting to feel good about themselves. To look at that in any objective way, it’s so irresponsible. All it does is create more unhappiness in the name of your own self-righteousness. This is what I call the self-love of self-hatred. It’s ‘I’m such a sinner and aren’t I wonderful for knowing that I’m a sinner’. The irresponsibility comes because they aren’t governing".

asiaseen

The Shagging Mezzanine

The All-Comers Shagging Mezzanine?

Hal

The Shagging Mezzanine

The All-Comers Shagging Mezzanine?

Not yet.

First The Shagging Mezzanine will release several albums and go on tour, individual members will release solo albums, there will be at least one greatest hits album.

Finally, in the manner of Ringo Starr And His All Starr Band, and noting Elton John and Leon Russell's The Union, only then will there be The All-Comers Shagging Mezzanine as the final climax.

Cozy Flatten

From Anthony Powell's memoirs, on Malcolm Muggeridge breaking the consensus...

The Muggeridge impact, for its cogency to bee appreciated, must be understood in relation to the intellectual atmosphere of the period.

At that time many people were apt to think of what was happening in Russia as not worse than a few rich people being relieved of their surplus cash, a proceeding of which some approved, some disapproved. True there were awkward stories about executions, torture, forced labour, government-engineered famine, but the analogy of omelettes and eggs would often be invoked by those who approved; while those who disapproved were suspected of doing so for the wrong reasons, that is to say desire to keep their own money.

When, from time to time, those now-called dissidents, having escaped to the West, described what was happening in Russia, no great impression was made on Left Wing intellectuals, who by then had invested too much moral capital in Soviet collectivism to adjust their portfolio without considerable loss of face; compassion being unevenly balanced against amour propre in most branches of life.

Cozy Flatten

A theory of snowflake formation

[Young people] are merely doing what young people have always done: testing the resolve of their elders and seeking the limits of their tolerance. The problem is not with the students, but with those who are supposed to be in authority over them, who cannot bear to see themselves as elders.

Once upon a time, something like a university was run by men and women in grey suits who set out rules and boundaries for those in their charge. From their offices on the second floor, they looked out on the quadrangle and rapped terrifyingly on the window when observing misbehavior or incivility. Now, it seems, they work with the curtains drawn while their students run amok. This is the snowflakes problem.

... Today’s university students seek to apply the most natural and tried method of young people since the time of Cain and Abel, by pushing their elders until someone lets a roar of “Enough!” But the “Enough!” never comes, nor the rapping on the second-floor window, and so the young must choose between effecting a coup d’etat or plunging further into petulance, puerility, and waywardness.

... The sibling society stands in contrast to what preceded it: the father-organized society in which authority was unafraid to speak or to be despised by the young for so doing. A working definition of authority might be: the capacity to endure unpopularity in the interests of the good.


David

those who are supposed to be in authority over them, who cannot bear to see themselves as elders… A working definition of authority might be: the capacity to endure unpopularity in the interests of the good.

That.

WTP

That

Exactly. Beat me to it. So many of my otherwise 'conservative' or at the very least, apolitical friends have children that failed to launch. It's something that is often difficult to overlook when discussing current events with so many of them. The number of times I have to bite my tongue. And it's mostly, as I see it anyway, that 10-15-20 years ago or so the stories they would tell of the stupid thing their kid did to which they laughed off or excused away out of fear of "becoming my mother/father". And I of course bit my tongue back then as well. It's all my fault, actually.

pst314

Like so many of her ideological peers, Ms Sarkar seems to proceed from the assumption that IQ isn’t innate and an inevitable cause of social differentiation but is instead merely something that schools and teachers bestow upon a person...

That is a very important observation, David: The continued failure of the great "affirmative action" policies of the sixties is, I am sure, responsible for a great deal of the left's increasingly frantic insanity regarding race: The left will not consider the possibility that its social policies might cause harm, and even more cannot admit the possibility that there might be innate IQ differences between populations. Thus their increasingly convoluted, recondite, baroque, hermetic, evidence-free theories of "systemic" racism.

(The left's lust for power also serves to explain its unshakable clinging to failed theories whose only virtue is their justification of terror and tyranny.)

Sam Duncan

“Like The Cocteau Twins”

[Gnnnnrrrgh... must... resist... pedantry....]

Acksherly... they, very pointedly, didn't have the definite article, because reasons.

[Phew. I think I got away with it by introducing sarcasm. Hey... am I actually typing this out? Yipe!]

David

Acksherly... they, very pointedly, didn’t have the definite article, because reasons.

Ah. I stand corrected. In my defence, I don’t believe I ever owned any of their records.

David

That is a very important observation,

The failure, or refusal, to grasp how intelligence seems to work causes all kinds of complications.

[ Added: ]

Quite old now, but somewhat related.

Sam Duncan

“Having been educated at a large state comprehensive school myself, it seems to me that the main advantage of a private over a state school has nothing to do with facilities or with the quality of the teaching staff (and certainly nothing to do with ‘buying’ A grades) but more in who the other children are and how they behave.”

Possibly. When a gang of boys at my school took it into their heads to roam the hushed halls of academe with knives, they only slashed people's bags open and nicked the contents, rather than, you know... stabbing them. But I'd venture to suggest that this would also be the case at most state schools, too.

Then again, when they were caught, the book was thrown at them. (Almost literally; we still had corporal punsishment.) I doubt that would have happened at the local Comp.

Darleen

those who are supposed to be in authority over them, who cannot bear to see themselves as elders… A working definition of authority might be: the capacity to endure unpopularity in the interests of the good.

It's the definition of parenting, too. There is no one way to parent as every child, even siblings, will respond differently to parental authority. However, that authority must be present to begin with. Love, bond, but don't be your child's "friend." You can be "friends" when they're 30 and parents themselves.

Parents shouldn't sweat the small stuff and a good marker of success is the ability to listen to one's child entering the throes of adolescence screaming "I hate you! I hate you! I wish I was never born!" without dissolving into a puddle of goo.

Too many Boomer parents gave up their authority to their children and it's created brittle adults who can't handle any manner of adversity or inconvenience. Tantrums is how they got stuff from their parents and they feel it's still a legit strategy.

Squires

A less obvious shortfall is that from the Boomer parents onward the passing on of useful skills became much less common, at least in the middle class. That is, things like general building, maintenance, and repair knowledge, skilled trade know-how, reading and negotiating with with people, street smarts, and realistic instruction on the nature of the opposite sex. These are all things not only useful of themselves, but also helpful in sending offspring out into the adult world with a properly developed sense of confidence.

Instead of this sort of parenting, what you find is mothers and fathers focused on providing their kids with “a better life” by focusing on their own careers so that they can afford to give their kids things. So those kids grow up having been given things, and having been taught jack shit.

Steve E

That is, things like general building, maintenance, and repair knowledge, skilled trade know-how...

My grandmother would hire a tradesman once. She would watch him like a hawk and learn how to make the repair so that she could do it herself the next time it needed fixing. Thanks to her cajoling and ability to fix things, I can perform repairs and do maintenance around the house and on my car.

I've tried to pass these skills on to my kids with limited success.

asiaseen

only then will there be The All-Comers Shagging Mezzanine as the final climax

The ultimate happy ending

Captain Nemo

I'm rather glad that I've been able to not internalize the many things that lead you to write that comment, despite my knowledge of their existence.

I have no idea what that means, but FWIW, my comment was nothing more than a throwaway joke.

pst314

The failure, or refusal, to grasp how intelligence seems to work causes all kinds of complications.

from your link:

"I once had a conversation with someone who banged on, at some length, about the evils of “the class system,” which, he insisted, had to be destroyed. I pointed out that there’s a thing called assortative mating, which describes the tendency of people to pair off with spouses of broadly comparable intelligence. (In news that will shock no-one, brain surgeons and architects don’t often marry night-shift cleaners or bin men.)"

On the other hand, some social institutions and customs can act against this tendency, so as to keep the classes mixing: Charles Murray, co-author of "The Bell Curve", has written that many social institutions of the 1950's and earlier served to facilitate the mixing of social classes: people of all sorts belonged to the same country clubs, supper clubs, service organizations (Moose, Elk, Eagle, Rotary) and so on, and thus a well-to-do man with a bachelor's or master's degree might meet and marry a secretary with a high school diploma. Today, however, with the decline of those organizations (due in part to attacks from the left), there is much less mixing.

Sam Duncan

”Charles Murray, co-author of "The Bell Curve", has written that many social institutions of the 1950's and earlier served to facilitate the mixing of social classes: people of all sorts belonged to the same country clubs, supper clubs, service organizations (Moose, Elk, Eagle, Rotary) and so on, and thus a well-to-do man with a bachelor's or master's degree might meet and marry a secretary with a high school diploma. Today, however, with the decline of those organizations (due in part to attacks from the left), there is much less mixing.”

My own parents were exactly that: a lawyer and a typist from a council estate who met through an operatic society. Two things strike me about this: first, as you say, such organizations are thinner on the ground these days, but also it's far less likely that someone from my mother's background would be interested in that kind of music in the first place.

There's a cozy myth, largely on the Left, that classical music was “middle class” and exclusionary until arts subsidy brought it to the masses. But I've seen with my own eyes that, if anything, precisely the opposite is the case. Hell, Enrico Caruso, the first man to sell a million records, was an operatic tenor, not a music-hall act.

Squires

There's a cozy myth, largely on the Left, that classical music was “middle class” and exclusionary until arts subsidy brought it to the masses. But I've seen with my own eyes that, if anything, precisely the opposite is the case.

From what I’ve heard it was also this way in the US, at least as late as the 1950s.

Hal

Is American Buddhism Really “Too White”?

You may wonder what all of this has to do with Buddhism. Was the Buddha interested in “unpacking whiteness”? Did Dogen have an officer in charge of Cultural Awareness and Diversity at Eihei-ji temple? Was Bodhidharma a champion of inclusivity? If you were to attend many of our larger American Zen centers without any prior knowledge of Buddhism you could be forgiven for believing these were major concerns of Buddhist thinkers throughout the ages.

Spoiler alert: They weren’t. The Buddha was against the Indian caste system and he allowed women to join his monastic order, which was very uncommon in his time. Dogen railed against the anti-inclusive sexist practices of some Zen Buddhists in Medieval Japan. But that’s about as close as you can get.

---For reference, Dogen . . .

Richard Cranium

I have no idea what that means, but FWIW, my comment was nothing more than a throwaway joke.

My late father told me several times "There are some things in life that you are better off not knowing about." I'm over 60 now and firmly believe that he was telling me the unvarnished truth.

IOW, if you don't know what I'm talking about, I consider you to be a very fortunate person. You should do a victory dance.

David

Clown World is a strange place.

And just a little creepy.

Via Julia.

Mags

Clown World is a strange place.

A recruitment adviser invited her to hand over “details and any evidence” of officers who may share her views so they could be “investigated”.

Wish they showed this much interest in burglaries.

Jonathan

The English:

Which one are you?

Barry Homan

Throwback question: many months ago, David posted a link on Friday Ephemera. It was a podcast I think, with an assortment of bizarre chants from various modern-day cults. Some were pretty kooky, I'd like to hear them again. Any chance of finding the link, David? Thank you.

David

Any chance of finding the link, David?

It’s a good job one of us keeps track of these things.

pst314

Justified reversal of note.

So, rhinos are just like British soccer fans?

John

Caption competition (better late than never).

Cat Stevens and family on staycation.

Barry Homan

It’s a good job one of us keeps track of these things.

Thanks for that, David. You da man.

Baceseras

Robert Warshow was an American writer in the postwar forties and fifties. His death at an early age was greatly regretted. A number of his best esays were gathered in a book called The Immediate Experience. Lionel and Diana Trilling had befriended Warshow; LT included this reminiscence in his Introduction for the book:

He on his side and we on ours were in articulate revolt against the dominant "progressive" ideas of child-rearing. We felt them to be charged with a scarcely concealed animosity to parents and an essential malice toward children which lay hidden under the manifest child-partisanship, an impulse to deprive children of their dignity by underestimating their powers. The three of us joined in repudiating the conception of life -- safe, simplified, unimpassioned -- that was implicit in almost everything that the experts were saying. We confessed to the most retrograde desires for our sons, that they should become men of firm and responsible character; and adventurous, even heroic, in their quest for happiness and even for pleasure; and, into the bargain, intellectually distinguished. We went so far as to think we had the right to influence them to have such intentions for themselves; we were willing, God forgive us, to commit the ultimate sin of "putting pressure" on them.

One conversation that I especially remember occurred in the company of others, of whom some expressed surprise and dismay at the line that Warshow was taking, and he, with great fervor made an appeal to history, choosing an example that would have quite confounded almost any truly progressive mind. He said: "When Charles I was in prison, awaiting execution, he had his youngest son, Henry, brought to him. The boy was nine years old. The father told the son what was going to happen, and explained that when he was dead there would be some people who would want to make Henry king, but that the boy must never consent to this because his oldest brother was rightfully the father's successor. Then he kissed the boy and sent him away. That was how a father once expected he could talk to his nine-year-old son."

 

Hal

An appreciation of snugness.

An appreciation of snugness.

David

That is a very important observation,

Well, it’s interesting how the contortions being performed in order to deny the obvious are most common among middle-class lefties. The people I know from working-class backgrounds generally seem much less agitated or offended by the fact that some people are smarter than others and were born that way. Unlike, say, Andrew Adonis, the former Labour Party schools minister, whose own education entailed boarding schools and Oxford, and who insisted that, “There is no genetic or moral reason why the whole of society should not succeed to the degree that the children of the professional classes do today, virtually all getting five or more good GCSEs and staying on in education beyond 16.”

This is an extraordinary claim, a bizarre supposition unmoored from reality. As I said in an earlier thread,

Has Andrew Adonis actually met a selection of children from across the entire ability range? Has he met them gathered in one room? I suspect not. And if he were to, would he close one eye and pretend that the child at one end of that spectrum… is inherently as capable as the child at the other extreme? Or would be if not for the evils of capitalism and “social privilege”?

Again, there’s the assumption that an IQ is something you can just pour into a head, any head, given a sufficient number of years spent being bored in a demoralised and demoralising state comprehensive school. (Which I suppose is another way for leftist educators to flatter themselves and overestimate their own importance – by in effect taking credit for someone else’s ability.)

At my state comprehensive, the span of ability ranged from a girl who’d memorised the entire periodic table, and could happily discuss it, to people who didn’t know their own postcodes and couldn’t be relied on to find out, or to retain the information until the following day. Their inability to do this, or other simple things, didn’t seem to have much to do with capitalism or “social privilege.” And the conceit that these extremes are interchangeable, and that the latter group could easily be enthusing about the properties of iridium, or parsing Chaucer, is ludicrous.

And this, remember, was Labour’s Minister for Schools

Lancastrian Oik

My own parents were exactly that: a lawyer and a typist from a council estate who met through an operatic society.

Mine were a trainee chartered accountant who had been to grammar school and a mill-worker who left school at fourteen. They met when my mother joined the church choir and the am-dram society of which my father was also a member. They were both working class, from similar homes, "two up, two down" terraced houses with outside lavatories and the tiny kitchen doubling up as the bathroom and laundry (I can still vividly remember my paternal grandparents having an "inside toilet" installed and the wonder and jealousy it aroused in their neighbours. This was sometime around 1965).

I don't know about the other side of the pond, but that's what some aspirational people did in those days. Going to "night school" to acquire further educational qualifications was also popular- my mother did that and eventually worked as a shorthand typist. By the time I was in my early twenties my parents were solidly middle-class and wealthy (XJ6 on the drive of the detached house, golf club memberships, cruises, etc.). It's a story familiar to many of us post-war boomers, and straight out of the novels of John Braine or Stan Barstow, except in my parents' case without the serial marital infidelities.

I sneered at this at the time, of course, but now I can see just what a force for good those societies and organisations were- male voice choirs, brass bands, the Women's Institute, am-dram, etc. The "small battalions" did wonders for social mobility.

pst314

This is an extraordinary claim, a bizarre supposition unmoored from reality.

That very unmooring from reality is why the left is trying hard to make it impossible to do research into the genetic basis of or heritability of intelligence: noone interested in such questions should be hired, or if hired given tenure. Those who do such research should be harassed and persecuted and fired on trumped up charges.

Darleen

“There is no genetic or moral reason why the whole of society should not succeed to the degree that the children of the professional classes do today, virtually all getting five or more good GCSEs and staying on in education beyond 16.”

Well, then, I should expect there is no genetic or moral reason any child shouldn't be able to run the marathon in 2:10, or qualify for an NBA team, or get first chair viola in the Los Angeles Philharmonic orchestra.

Sam Duncan

Instructional video.

Darleen

BTW -- I think my 2020 Bingo card is now almost to "blackout" status.

Unprecedented fire tornado warning issued in California after a fiery twister forms in a record-setting heat wave.

*Fire* tornado. Lassen County is about 550 miles north of me, however, for those keeping score at home ... these were the high readings from the backyard thermometer over the weekend:

Saturday 106F/41.1C
Sunday 102F/38.8C

Today's expected high 100F/37.7C

David

Saturday 106F/41.1C

[ Rummages in freezer. Gives hastily-unwrapped Magnum a thorough tonguing. ]

David

In other news, ludicrous educator still ludicrous.

Via Damian.

Sam Duncan

“In other news, ludicrous educator still ludicrous.”

I often wonder whether this is just pure slander or if these idiots genuinely don't know what fascism is. One thing's for sure, they don't want the people they're “educating” to find out.

Governor Squid

...these idiots genuinely don't know what fascism is.

They've been programmed to think that national socialism and international socialism are so different as to be incomparable with each other. Little wonder then that they have trouble with fascism and anti-fascism.

Steve E

They've been programmed to think that national socialism and international socialism are so different as to be incomparable with each other.

That, and they suffer from Humpty Dumptyism when it comes to the meaning of words.

"When I use a word, Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less."
John

Why not accept the obvious explanation that she’s a nasty female dog with racial and personal inferiority complexes that can never be assuaged no matter how much hollow success she may achieve. Her pronouncements are ever more extreme but the reaction generated will never be sufficient and eventually someone even nastier snd more self-obsessed will occupy the spotlight,

What is the Delhi equivalent of “cats, lots of them”.

Squires

...accept the obvious explanation that she’s a nasty female dog with racial and personal inferiority complexes that can never be assuaged no matter how much hollow success she may achieve.

There are few things more tragic than a thoroughly ugly woman.

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