David Thompson
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September 11, 2020

Comments

Hal

The thrill of the circus.

Aerial human bowling. She got one point for the first frame, and two more for the second.

The camel was the randomized launching platform.

Rick Henwood

Self-censoring font

My what a lovely place you have here barkeep. Why it is so clean and bright-lit! Such interesting conversation and such a woke crowd! Gender Studies and Race Relations PhDs abound! Ah, a copy of the Guardian and CNN on the telly! Is that a Joe Biden poster? And a framed photograph of you and Jerry Corbyn. My, well I'll be telling all my friends and we'll be sure to drop by every night. Cheerio.

JuliaM

"Found reading the book laborious, but anyway, this is coming."

Didn't need to click the link to know what the film was! :)

Mike

“Something needed to be done.”

Brilliant.

John D

Scenes.

LOL. That can't be real... can it?

David

Morning, all.

That can’t be real... can it?

Alas, no.

Didn’t need to click the link to know what the film was! :)

Fans of the thing insist that Dune is a massively important book, a great work, a classic, etc. Well, maybe it is. It has scope, certainly. But from what little I remember of reading it – or rather, trying to read it before giving up in despair - it’s also tedious, rather clunky, and the prose is awful.

David

Didn’t need to click the link to know what the film was! :)

I don’t have much patience for novels at the best of times and haven’t read one in years. It’s not a form I enjoy particularly. As a way of delivering ideas, it’s a bit slow and round-the-houses, almost antiquated, and even in the good ones the ratio of insight to padding isn’t great. They tend to lack economy.

BlokeInAShed

The self censoring font didn't change "pakeha" which I thought was derogatory, but it did change another word I entered to "vulva"
Also the "something needed to be done" is indeed brilliant

Richard Cranium

No, don't thank me.

I'm not sure what I am seeing there.

BlokeInAShed

On the self censoring font again, if you try "arse" and "ass" you get a dot pattern thing and they are different. Can anyone explain that?

David

I’m not sure what I am seeing there.

It’s Laurie Penny, being, er, sexy. Found via her Twitter feed.

Couldn’t you feel the sexy?

Steve E

I don’t have much patience for novels at the best of times and haven’t read one in years. It’s not a form I enjoy particularly.

In my dotage, I've turned to the short story. The format gets to the point more quickly while still packing a punch.

I read Dune in my late adolescence and loved it enough to read all six books in the trilogy. Reading the first book was frustrating at times because it was necessary to flip to the back of the book to look up the odd alien words in the glossary. So it was a chore at times, but only because it interrupted my involvement with the story.

Microbillionaire

The self-censoring font has some hilarious bloopers. Type in "Pakistan" and it'll give you "Pakistani peopletan", because clearly the first element of the country name is a slur...

On the self censoring font again, if you try "arse" and "ass" you get a dot pattern thing and they are different. Can anyone explain that?
The words are different length? "asshole" gives you another larger dot pattern thing.
Hal

The self-censoring font has some hilarious bloopers.

Svulvahorpe

Nikw211

The self-censoring font has some hilarious bloopers.

"Diane Aboriginal person"

Hal

Today’s word is ambition.

Quite the other end of several scales, Cattt.

svh

San Francisco 2020

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/399873/

Ed Snack

Have to say I enjoyed Dune when I first read it many, many years ago. But my favourite of the series (and I couldn’t finish all of them) was the second, Dune Messiah. Much shorter, more cryptic, almost Greek Tragedeic in its inevitability. Better written too I thought, but to be fair I haven’t many to agree with me on that.

Dune was considered one of the three late 60’s essential Sci-Fi blockbusters, along with “Stranger in a Strange Land” and “Stand on Zanzibar” (John Brunner). Of the three, I think Dune has lasted the best. Just FWIW.

And that “ambition is unbearably cute, to someone contemplating a new kitten.

Hal

San Francisco 2020

Dawn occurred at 6:46, which was the first thing I looked up once home from work.

At 8, all buildings and streetlights in what I saw of SF and the East Bay were still fully lit up for 3 AM . . . .

Microbillionaire

"Diane Aboriginal person"

"Diane Aboriginal persontt", please. ;-)

Connor

I’m not entirely sure what’s happening here.

"I need your clothes, your boots and your motorcycle."

asiaseen

What's happening here

The hi-viz man in the 3rd photo is ROTFLHAO?

George

That self-censoring font leaves 'Fenian', 'Taig', 'Prod' and 'Sammy' untouched... F**k all use in this part of the world.

Felcity

Something needed to be done

I have something in my eye...they are all watery

David

I have something in my eye...they are all watery

Well, I’m not dusting again until Spring.

Felicity

Something needed to be done

I seem to have something in my eye....

Hal

F**k all use in this part of the world.

F**k all is perfectly fine, as are bugger and shite. Idiot turns into a cloud of dots. Gormless is fine.

Largs

Self censoring font: Antifa are leftist vulvas. Well it didn't change what I wrote very much.

David

I seem to have something in my eye....

I think Felicity’s caught in some kind of temporal loop. Someone shake her by the elbows.

Captain Nemo

Why do they ALL look like this? https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1304291625040924672/photo/1

Captain Nemo

Why do they ALL look like this? https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1304291625040924672/photo/1

Captain Nemo

Oops. Sorry for the double post - I don't know what happened there.

Hal

Why do they ALL look like this? https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1304291625040924672/photo/1

Why do they ALL look like this? https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1304291625040924672/photo/1

. . . . . it might not be Felicity . . . David, have you been strolling about in a black duster recently?

Patrick Brown

Self censoring font: I tried "mewling quim", and it didn't censor that.

WTP

Here's a story I haven't seen much of outside of GA and would only know of it because an old friend's son (not mentioned in this article) was one of the whistleblowers in this case. He was also harassed by the Chief for his refusal to play in their little dick-pic game...

https://www.11alive.com/article/news/investigations/the-reveal/dunwoody-police-lt-sexting-reveal-investigation/85-8ab458d8-63eb-43db-89ce-3645825cbac1

Kevin B

Some amusing wildlife photos for your delectation. Might cheer us up a bit.

David

Might cheer us up a bit.

I’m actually feeling rather upbeat at the moment. For some reason, grocery shopping does that to me.

[ Drapes tatty and suspiciously discoloured bunting above bar. ]

See? Positively jolly.

Governor Squid

Something needed to be done

It gets better: a handful of NASCAR drivers are sending stuff to the kid and the homeowner.

David

[ Rummages under bar, slyly opens canister of nitrous oxide. ]

I bet you’re feeling more cheerful already.

Bugger. Wrong gas.

[ Hurriedly drags canister away, starts flapping bar towel. ]

aelfheld

while watching the flamingos feed I couldn't but help but think it unlikely any of them got out of the water to go to the bathroom.

aelfheld
Found reading the book laborious, but anyway, this is coming.

I recall enjoying Dune though, admittedly, I was rather younger then. It was the sequels, each more tortuous than the last, that put me off.

aelfheld
Well, I’m not dusting again until Spring.

Again?

Daniel Ream

Fans of the thing insist that Dune is a massively important book, a great work, a classic, etc.

I don't know about important - I tend to be skeptical of claims that any work of fiction is "important".

But it is absolutely a classic of science fiction and I would put it up against any of the "great 20th century novels" for quality.

And remember, the book was written as an allegory for both the rise of Mohammed and Islam in the 7th century and modern oil politics in the 20th. It predicted the 1973 oil crisis a decade in advance.

David

But it is absolutely a classic of science fiction and I would put it up against any of the “great 20th century novels” for quality.

I read it, or read it in part, decades ago and can’t recall enough to say much about it, beyond the unhappy prose style and the slog of reading it. Rather like David Lynch’s film, the details of which also seem to have evaporated from memory, except for a general dislike, and a vague sense that its sentiment regarding messiahs seemed somewhat at odds with what I remembered, or misremembered, of the book.

But again, I’m not an enthusiast of novels as a form.

Microbillionaire

I passed the self-censoring font around to some friends. A few highlights we found:

Spice -> Latinxe (with a dozen funny variants, like Suspicious -> SuLatinxious)
Homosexual -> gay peopleexual
Hoe -> sexually active woman
Fatty acid -> voluptuous person acid
Prostitute -> sex worker
Commie -> leftist
Skyscraper -> Sky*****er
Prickling -> *****ling
Hearse -> He****

Those with the asterisks really make the word look far more obscene after the censoring, don't they? We also found that despite the replacements for Commie and Prostitute, it won't touch Nazi, Fascist, Fash or Pimp. Neither is there any politening of Murderer, Rapist, Pedo. Finally, a 'freak accident' is now a 'non-conformist accident'.

And this would all be silently edited client-side. What an absolutely terrible idea. I have written a letter to them advising them to cease and desist, because that particular project appears to be at the narrow intersection of people who might plausibly listen to outside reason and people who threaten to make the world noticeably worse. Not that I have high hopes.

Sam

I find it my marital obligation to describe to my wife the benefit I incur from this site in order to justify the occasional foreign currency tender to a stranger in England. Surely this week's ephemera will illuminate the steady brilliance and measured but playful critique on our mad world that I find irresistible, so that any discussion around future contributions will be downright unnecessary.

The thrill of the circus. || The thrill of Tesco. || The thrill of mould.

Ah. Well. "I promise this isn't for prOn, honey" will still have to suffice.

David

in order to justify the occasional foreign currency tender to a stranger in England.

[ Exudes air of mystery and exotic sexual intrigue. ]

pst314

I recall enjoying Dune though, admittedly, I was rather younger then.

As the old joke goes, the Golden Age of science fiction is not the 1940's or 1950's or 1960's. It's ages 12-16.

I read it, or read it in part, decades ago and can’t recall enough to say much about it, beyond the unhappy prose style and the slog of reading it.

Yes, Frank Herbert was not all that great a storyteller, but he had some interesting ideas and was sometimes able to build an interesting story on them, but most of his stories I found hard to get through.

Having grown out of the pulps, a lot of sf was rather badly written: terrible prose style, bad characterization, clunky plots, etc. In defense against criticism of these weaknesses there developed an attitude that writing quality did not really matter as what was important were the ideas. Fortunately the quality improved greatly with the arrival of more talented writers. Amazingly, there actually were sf fans who angrily opposed the new, better writers, presumably out of a misplaced defensiveness but perhaps because they actually liked crappy pulp fiction. (Consider that there are fans who profess to be unable to see the fascist theme running through the movie Starship Troopers.)

Squires

Couldn’t you feel the sexy?

Was it supposed to be an accident that she was in frame and/or in her case underwear?

And is she trying to help ruin DnD now, too?

Much shorter, more cryptic, almost Greek Tragedeic in its inevitability.

I’ll have to pick that one up, now.

On the subject of short and cryptic, it occurs to me that Gene Wolfe’s most revered work,The New Sun Cycle, mostly consists of some of his shortest novels. (Props to The Fifth Head of Cerebus as well - a shorter book, composed of three novellas.)

SumDumGuy

Premature greeting

Last heavy rainfall I found myself driving through a neighborhood I don't normally traffic, as I was coming around a bend at a low point between two small hills, I noticed three young girls standing on a storm drain next to the street where a large puddle had accumulated. At first I started to slow down and move over to avoid the puddle but then I saw that they were all wearing bathing suits and had huge grins on their faces. Needless to say I channeled my inner Farragut and did my best to soak those three young ladies. I haven't seen kids enjoying that kind of innocent fun in a long time.

The thrill of the circus.

1. She was wearing panties
2. They even appear to be clean.

Her mother would be proud.

pst314

...Dune Messiah. Much shorter, more cryptic, almost Greek Tragedeic in its inevitability. Better written too I thought

A common sin in sf is the short story padded out to novel length, and the novel padded out to doorstop length. Also the endless sequels written either because the fans will buy them (and thus the publisher demands them) or because the author has run out of ideas.

Gene Wolfe’s most revered work,The New Sun Cycle, mostly consists of some of his shortest novels.

I don't recall them being noticeably shorter. But bear in mind that the first 4 books were only published as separate novels because of the problems with selling a novel which is 1200 pages in one volume. In fact, the New Sun tetralogy was originally conceived as a short story or novelette and "just grew" as Wolfe wrote it.

Squires

I don't recall them being noticeably shorter.

They average less than 250 pages (minus the later coda). That’s shorter than his Latro novels, much shorter than Dune, and a hell of a lot shorter than the completed entries in George Martin’s folly.

There may be something to good editors who know when to say “No!”, and to authors who know when to listen.

pst314

They average less than 250 pages

Now you've forced me to look on the shelf: My first edition New Sun hardcovers are each about 300 pages, while my first edition Latro novels are each about 325 pages. Of course I must caution myself that a truly accurate comparison would be by word count, but I don't think this conversation justifies that amount of sleuthing.

George Martin’s folly.

I found him almost unreadable even in his first, shorter novels. By the way, I never read the later Dune sequels. The last one I was able to finish was Children of Dune

There may be something to good editors who know when to say “No!”, and to authors who know when to listen.

Indeed, indeed. Gene was one of those writers who didn't need such editing, to the best of my knowledge. (And I vaguely recall editor David Hartwell making comments to that effect.) An awful lot of writers do need strong editing of one sort or another. Some are horrible spellers or even dyslexic, others suffer from logorrhea, and so on.

aelfheld
[...] the Golden Age of science fiction is not the 1940's or 1950's or 1960's. It's ages 12-16.

I'm well past 16 & still enjoy science fiction. The 'Golden Age' is where you find it.

I must admit to being unable to identify a fascist theme in Starship Troopers.

Darleen

California queen expounding on the fertility of wypipo.

pst314

California queen expounding on the fertility of wypipo.

We Wuz Kangs therefore she's a queen?

Darleen

Consider that there are fans who profess to be unable to see the fascist theme running through the movie Starship Troopers.

Which fans? Fans of the book hate the movie because it bears no resemblance to the book. Even the maker of the movie hated Heinlein's book and that's why they bought the title to slap on a straight-to-video script.

pst314

Which fans?

Sorry, I meant fans of the movie. I have met few fans of the book who do not hate the movie--although I have met some. And you are absolutely right: Paul Verhoeven hated the novel (although I hear he didn't read more than a small part) and inserted the fascist tropes to criticize (misrepresent) the novel.

Darleen

We Wuz Kangs therefore she's a queen?

Cuz she can make all colors, donja know?

Here's hoping she makes the permanent no-fly list.

Sam

Paul Verhoeven hated the novel...and inserted the fascist tropes to criticize (misrepresent) the novel.

Yeah, except he screwed up. He portrayed Rico, Rasczak et al as unabashedly confident, competent, firm but fair protagonists whose purpose (our species' survival) was as noble as they come. IE, he made the "fascists" fucking awesome, and - given the stakes of the war - perfectly reasonable.

pst314

Cuz she can make all colors, donja know?

I don't get that reference.

Rick Henwood

[ Rummages under bar, slyly opens canister of nitrous oxide. ]

Hahahaha Ha! Oh David you are so funny! LOL! ROFLMYO!

Stop waving that rag about! It just makes it funnier!

lotocoti

You’d never tire of this.

I thought I only needed an Atomic coffee maker. I was wrong.

Sam Duncan

“The thrill of Tesco.”

It's amazing what foreign people will consider exotic and interesting, and I think we often fail to recognise that in Britain. Back in the '90s, the Italians considered Rover the epitome of cool. There was even a cologne.

“Those with the asterisks really make the word look far more obscene after the censoring, don't they?”

Not the best example (although Humph's intro is typically hilarious), but it reminds me of this.

devilbunny

he made the "fascists" fucking awesome

Much the same problem as the "Harry Potter with guns" video. If you're anti-gun, and you make a video that pretty much makes guns out to be amazing and hilarious, well, enjoy your own-goal?

Darleen

I don't get that reference.

It's part of her rantings why all the inferior white people must make way for her. Her genes are dominant and she can make any color person in the world.

This is that weird Nation of Islam/Black Panther crap from the 60s.

Uma Thurmond's Feet

Re "Starship Troopers": I love the book and enjoyed the movie (titties in the shower, what's not to love?). I love that the director hated the book and tried to sabotage it, but the characters won out anyway, especially since there was nothing about the bugs that indicated that the earthlings were at fault, and that, well, "what are you going to do?" (which is our catchphrase about situations in which your back is against the wall and sitting down with your enemies and singing "Kumbaya" will get your throat slit anyway.

At the same time, if we were in a pub and had a few pints, I'd love to hear someone's digression about why ST the movie is fascist. Seriously. Film discussions are really entertaining. My wife and I just saw the Harry Potter movies, and the Dursley's come off much better and more sympathetic in the films than the books. And Dumbledore lived down to his name for being the worst headmaster in Hogwarts' history.

Hal

David Lynch’s film, the details of which also seem to have evaporated from memory, except for a general dislike, and a vague sense that its sentiment regarding messiahs seemed somewhat at odds with what I remembered, or misremembered, of the book.

Basically, David Lynch's Flying! Worms! In! Spaaaaaaaaace!!! is definitely a totally Lynch all out screwup rather than an issue with Herbert. Quite entirely, it has as much to do with Herbert as Heinlein has to do with Random Bugs By Verhoeven . . .

Daniel Ream

Rather like David Lynch’s film

Much like Starship Troopers, the film bears little resemblance to the book and manages a Man of La Mancha level of inversion of the point of the original.

If you don't like novels as a literary form I doubt Dune will change your mind, but judging the book y an inferior film adaptation seems...odd.

I'd love to hear someone's digression about why ST the movie is fascist.

Broadly, the Terran Federation is portrayed as nationalistic, militaristic and jingoistic, and uses propaganda that the audience is supposed to recognize as Nazi-esque. The subtext is that we're only seeing the propaganda, and the truth is much more sinister. Of course Verhoeven never shows us "the truth", beyond clumsy and nonsensical scenes like the "why have the Mobile Infantry if you have nukes" bit, which just end up being campy and hilarious.

It's fascist in the same way that anything Hollywood progs dislike is called fascist, regardless of what the word "fascist" actually means in political science.

David

but judging the book by an inferior film adaptation seems...odd.

I’m not doing that. I’m just noting that I didn’t enjoy either of them - and as we’ve both said, they seem to differ quite significantly. To be clear, I’m not suggesting that no-one could enjoy the book. Evidently, lots of people have. And good for them. I’m just saying I didn’t enjoy it, that I remember the prose being awful, and that I’m not an enthusiast of novels generally, largely because of the padding that novels tend to entail. It’s a preference on my part, an impatience; not an assertion of aesthetic profundity.

pst314

she can make any color person in the world.

Ah, I see now. Thanks. (And as a matter of fact I was not able to make out everything she said.)

This is that weird Nation of Islam/Black Panther crap from the 60s.

Which unfortunately is not extinct. But I suppose it gives losers something to be proud of.

pst314

Broadly, the Terran Federation is portrayed as nationalistic, militaristic and jingoistic, and uses propaganda that the audience is supposed to recognize as Nazi-esque.

Thanks for posting something before I could return to this thread. The movie even goes so far as to have Rico's friend Carl show up in what we are supposed to recognize as a Gestapo outfit.

pst314

By the way, science fiction writers and critics (and even professors) have been branding Starship Troopers as fascistic ever since it was published. But they all resorted to creatively dishonest readings of the novel--which is what you expect from leftists.

John

There are some watchable YouTube videos, including this one by Sargon, putting forward the theory that ST delivers a strongly libertarian as opposed to a fascist message.

https://youtu.be/kVpYvV0O7uI

pst314

To be clear, I’m not suggesting that no-one could enjoy the book. Evidently, lots of people have. And good for them...

[lets out sigh of relief]

"...I’m just saying I didn’t enjoy it, that I remember the prose being awful..."

It certainly was not great. How about "varies between awful and servicable"?

"...and that I’m not an enthusiast of novels generally, largely because of the padding that novels tend to entail."

Padding is a common sin, but it sounds like an overstatement to say that novels tend to this: Rather, the whole purpose of a novel is different than a short story: A short story has a simple plot, only a few themes, and a small cast of characters. A novel has a more complex plot (maybe a collection of interwoven plots), many themes, and a larger cast of characters. I tend to see padding when those additional elements do not add to the story but merely make it longer. (David, does your Correction Booth play endless loops from Game of Thrones?)

David

(David, does your Correction Booth play endless loops from Game of Thrones?)

Heh. The last couple of seasons, yes.

[lets out sigh of relief]

This is my softer, nurturing side. Enjoy it while it lasts.

pst314

This is my softer, nurturing side. Enjoy it while it lasts.

David

[ Attempts to feign indignation, fails. ]

aelfheld
Sorry, I meant fans of the movie.

Never having seen the movie I really can't speak to it.

Darleen

To be clear, I’m not suggesting that no-one could enjoy the book. Evidently, lots of people have

I confess, I feel that way about LOTR. One of the few non-fiction trilogies my hubby has read and he loves it. I absolutely love the films but to this day haven't gotten more than 1/3 the way into the first book.

Padding is a common sin,

IMHO the amount of padding increases as an author gets more "popular". See: Stephen King. It's like editors become too intimidated to do their job properly.

Sam Duncan

“I confess, I feel that way about LOTR. One of the few non-fiction trilogies my hubby has read and he loves it. I absolutely love the films but to this day haven't gotten more than 1/3 the way into the first book.”

I first tried to read it at school after thoroughly enjoying The Hobbit, and for about 30 years I never got past page 23. I haven't seen the films, but I did manage to make it to... well, possibly around page 23 of The Two Towers a year or two ago. Still can't say I'm riveted though, and I haven't even picked it up since.

But, as I always say (I think I wrote a whole post on it for Counting Cats), I fully appreciate the achievement of Tolkein's detailed worldbuilding. I just don't like the book very much.

David

One of the few non-fiction trilogies…

Um. Huge if true.

Steve E

Huge if true.

We have Orcs living down the street. Their property is a mess, as you would expect.

Uma Thurmond's Feet

J.K. Rowling also was infected with paddingitis (not to be confused with paddingtonitis, in which you turn into a soft, fuzzy bear, or at least the mind of one).

As for LOTR, I reread the trilogy recently and understood that I reached an age in which I had the patience to let myself slip into the prose, and enjoyed it very much. Even the Tom Bombadil section.

What struck me even more about LOTR was the overarching sadness that the age of magic was ending, and as the hobbits saw when Saurman came to the Shire that the Age of Man was going to become industrial and not a little grim. It helped that Tolkien romanticized the little buggers and their bucolic life in the countryside. They can eat bacon but not have to get their hands bloody slaughtering the pigs. They can get old but not have their teeth fall out ("two words: modern dentistry"). The Shire was bountiful and never had a failing harvest or resort to cannibalism to stay alive.

Darleen

One of the few non-fiction trilogies

Yikes ... not enough coffee before I wrote that. Clarity - husband doesn't really read fiction much at all and certainly not anything approaching a series. LOTR is his one beloved exception.

David

Yikes

See, this is why I have to water down the drinks.

David

Regarding Dune, the thing that came to mind, oddly enough, was Doctor Who, in that the premise, the concept, and some of the ideas within it, are generally better than the execution – the thing that ends up on screen, or on the page. I think that’s sort of the point I’m trying to make.

fnord

Lots of people are stupid, left hand side of the bell curve don'tchaknow, and they need to occupy themselves somehow.

TomJ
I first tried to read it at school after thoroughly enjoying The Hobbit, and for about 30 years I never got past page 23. I haven't seen the films, but I did manage to make it to... well, possibly around page 23 of The Two Towers a year or two ago. Still can't say I'm riveted though, and I haven't even picked it up since.

I read LotR while in my early teens and have returned to it a few times in adulthood. While still at school I also read The Silmarillion but, despite having a copy, have never attempted it again. I also have a copy of Unfinished Tales; it is so named for a reason.

TimT

Is it the time of year for inveighing against Lord of the Rings again? There are certain childhood favourites one reads as an adult and realises with regret what poor taste one had. But LOTR was never that way for me; I was bored by it even as a child. I kept on out of a general affection for fantasy and appreciation of The Hobbit - there Tolkien actually did write well.

Squires

There are certain childhood favourites one reads as an adult and realises with regret what poor taste one had.

I missed out on this by mostly raiding my parents’ bookshelves from an early age.

Of the few books I recall reading as a child that were actually written for younger audiences, the Tripods series stands out as holding up.

Baceseras

The paperback Lord of the Rings looked attractive when I was around 13 or 14, but I started reading it in the bookstore and, though I tried several times on repeated visits, I just knew I'd never finish the book, much less the trilogy. It was shelved near the Rider Haggards with the Frank Frazetta covers, and those I bought and devoured happily. Likewise the John Carter series by Burroughs, and eventually his Tarzans. I even enjoyed the low-level pulp of the Doc Savage books. This kind of novel for me has nothing to do with what some call "working out ideas" -- it's the joy of storytelling you can get good and lost in; fantastic adventures.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Enough of this nonsense about children's books, Sinatra and Elvis.

However, for those of you who can't break the comic book habit, a new Wonder Wxmyn DC comic.

Hal

I even enjoyed the low-level pulp of the Doc Savage books.

Holy Cow. I'll be superamalgamated.

TimT

” Of the few books I recall reading as a child that were actually written for younger audiences, the Tripods series stands out as holding up.”

John Christopher’s Tripods! Very good stuff!

” This kind of novel for me has nothing to do with what some call "working out ideas" -- it's the joy of storytelling you can get good and lost in; fantastic adventures.”

Both have their place, but the pity of it is, Tolkien COULD be a good storyteller. He just lost his essential storyline somewhere amidst working out all the other details re: dwarves, orcs, elven languages, etc.

Hal

Hmmmm. Where's the button for that sign over the bar???

Anyway . . .

David

Also available as a tattoo. See Big Sheila at the bar.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

See Big Sheila at the bar.

I am afraid she is occupied at the moment.

Meanwhile, at the KFC there is a dispute at the counter.

David

Meanwhile, at the KFC there is a dispute at the counter.

The word that came to mind was landfill.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Up in Scotland, Robert the Bruce whirls in his grave like a runaway gyroscope.

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