David Thompson
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October 19, 2020

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Col. Milquetoast

A while back I binge watched a British show about expensive homebuilding called Grand Designs. A very common theme was the Council telling the homebuilder that their modernist design needed to be more traditional or that their traditional design needs to be more modernist. My impression is that it is a Council of sadists. Another surprisingly common theme was someone spending a humongous sum of money on a plot of land and then calmly explaining that it took 5-7 years for the Council to give them permission to build.

I’m surprised the Council being exposed as busybody sadists hasn’t resulted in a violent revolution.

George

Douglas Murray is serious, brave, important and very, very bright. Intellectually, he's operating on an entirely different level from Dennis Prager and, as a result, there are a few somewhat embarrassing moments in this conversation. But it's still worth watching.

WTP

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Said this very same sort of thing, not openly nor in some attention seeking manner, but privately to my 'conservative' Presbyterian doctor 25 years ago. I was told to laugh at it and if I thought it was a real problem I probably needed to speak to a psychiatrist.

Also find it rather odd that Prager hadn't heard of 4'33" until just recently but, whatever. Y'all getting what you've closed your eyes to for decades.

David

Another surprisingly common theme was someone spending a humongous sum of money on a plot of land and then calmly explaining that it took 5-7 years for the Council to give them permission to build.

Ah, Blighty. I remember quite enjoying Grand Designs, though I haven’t seen it in years, assuming it’s still around.

David

Douglas Murray is… brave…

I did like his answer to that assessment when Prager said the same. I.e., that it isn’t bravery, more a dislike of lies. Being expected to lie, and lie repeatedly, as if one had no probity, no capacity to demur, is insulting. It therefore offers some, as it were, fuel for outspokenness.

George

@WTP

In fairness to Prager (my comment just before yours notwithstanding), I don't think he had just heard of 4'33". Rather, he had recently come across it on a CD, which struck him as even more ludicrous than the idea of public performance. For what it's worth (and I think DM was gently suggesting something along the same lines), I see 4'33" as the musical equivalent of Duchamp's Fontaine; it's making a point about what music is (and possibly isn't). And while countless mediocre hacks have simply repeated Duchamp's point (and continue to do so to this day), Cage has been spared that to a great extent because the sheer gall that would be required to present 6'27" or 3'51" or whatever of silence would be probably too much for even the most shameless charlatan.

George

@David

He's a gentleman so of course he will demur if someone tells him that he's courageous (or brave, whatever). But in reality he isn't animated by a dislike of lies as opposed to being brave; it's his dislike of lies that makes him brave.

David

It’s his dislike of lies that makes him brave.

That’s sort of the point I was hoping to make. Albeit ineptly. :-)

WTP

@George

While that's not how I recall what DP said coming across (and too lazy to wade through the dialogue again to find it), that certainly would make more sense to me. It's a fairly well-known...uh...piece...and I find the in-passing discussion of it interesting. I've never dug too deeply into Cage, partly because I would prefer not to have my illusions about 4'33" shattered. I like to think of it as a form of commentary on the ultimate absurdity of minimalism and something of an Emperor's Clothes itself. Similar with Duchamp's...whatever...though that was more Dada-ism...or whatever. I simultaneously find it interesting and yet I really don't care. Which I see as the point. I'm a bit of a silly optimistic idealist that way. Probably the only way.

David

Mr Prager’s attempt at a 1960s Leeds accent made me chuckle.

WTP

Mr Prager’s attempt at a 1960s Leeds accent made me chuckle

Actually reminded me of a short conversation I had with a gentleman while getting my dog out of the truck at a filling station outside of Gainesville, GA a few years back...

Gentleman: Wakinnadohzat?

Me (quickly translating to something resembling American English): Him? Oh, he's a Manchester Terrier.

G: Canneecheeaskirl?

Me: Tree one? Sure, but he hasn't caught one yet.

Governor Squid

I like the bit about Sainsbury's around 29:00, though I feel that DM missed an opportunity to drive home a basic truth revealed by the "racists should buy their chocolates elsewhere" campaign. To wit: if racists existed in any real numbers, it would be expensive to chase them off in such a way. It's only because this group is so vanishingly small that retailers feel free to make such grand gestures. They can score cheap social credit points with tens of thousands, while losing a few dozen customers at most.

David

It’s only because this group is so vanishingly small that retailers feel free to make such grand gestures.

Quite. The preening reveals the lie.

Darleen

::::snort:::

Dagmar

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8851599/Emirati-minister-tolerance-accused-sexual-assault-Hay-literary-festival-organiser.html

Whatever organic connection the Hay Festival might originally have had with books and the people who read them, for years now it's been a cultural NGO or a Davos for the StephenFry-tellegensia. When this NGO and its successful brand concept of Intellectual Openness is bought by oil sheiks, nobody can be deluded that it's because the sheiks are book lovers or intellectually open or any of that. How surprising to find the Minister for Tolerance treating the NGO manager and her principles as bought and paid for and available to use as he sees fit.

WTP

Election simulation. Dumb bastard misunderstood the meeting agenda. It can happen, I suppose.

Squires

How surprising...

Every time a story like this comes up I’m reminded of the tale of one particular German apostate from Islam. The short version is that she met an incredibly charming Arab, moved in with him, became alienated from everyone she knew who questioned the relationship, converted, married, bore him a child, and eventually (several years later,IIRC) followed him back to the Gulf state he came from... which is where he ceased bothering with the charade. Fast forward to her finally managing to secret herself away to the nearest German embassy, and spilling her guts about everything that had happened to the older woman who received her. The older woman looked at her and said, “Why don’t you girls ever listen!

Daniel Ream

I can't decide whether Prager is thick, getting bad advice, or controlled opposition. He's the one primarily responsible for this meme that Big Social Media has to decide whether they're publishers or platforms because they can't be both, when the governing legislation is clear, has been around for 25 years, and means they can do exactly what they're doing. He wasted heaven knows how much money on a frivolous lawsuit against Facebook/YouTube that any competent lawyer should have told him was going to get dismissed at initial motions.

In the mean time, people all over are crying "Publishers XOR platforms! Public commons! Repeal S.230!" with no idea whatsoever of the legal reasoning behind s.230 or why it's absolutely necessary.

Prager does good work in his little US civics videos but he's doing incalculable damage with this one issue.

Darleen

Daniel,

When a person can't use the internet withOUT Google and Google is free to quash your ass for not being woke, they have a monopoly that needs to be broken up.

Liam

"The New Yorker has suspended reporter Jeffrey Toobin for masturbating on a Zoom video chat between members of the New Yorker and WNYC radio last week. Toobin says he did not realize his video was on."

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/407825/

'Our betters'.

Nikw211

Less dramatic than some of the other news cuttings posted up between the salted peanuts and the old dartboard behind the bar there, but possibly more significant in the long run (for those at the British end of the bar, near the greyish 'sausage' rolls / fly mattress).

Joanna Williams in the The Spectator 'Where have all the male teachers gone?':

    [T]the ‘exodus of male teachers’ from secondary schools that is raising concern. The proportion of men in secondary schools has fallen year on year since 2010 and now stands at just 35.5 per cent.

And:

    White boys who have free school meals achieve an average point score of 28.5 at GCSE, compared with a national average of 46.5. The gender imbalance in the teaching profession may offer one clue as to why boys are falling so far behind girls. [ ... ] The achievements of famous women are showcased in school poster displays, inspirational women speakers are brought in to speak at assemblies, and girls-only science projects are standard fare. Schools treat girls like an oppressed minority when, in reality, it is boys who are underachieving.

The Times Education Supplement's take on the same issue 'Pay freezes blamed for huge drop in male teachers':

    The decline of male teachers has been fuelled by a significant fall in the proportion of white male teachers in schools, with the number in secondary schools falling by more than 12,800 since 2010 – a decline of 17 per cent, according to an analysis by the Education Policy Institute (EPI) thinktank.

    Overall, this means the proportion of men teaching in secondary schools has fallen year-on-year since 2010, hitting its lowest level last year when 35.5 per cent of teachers were male, the analysis shows. But figures in primary schools have stagnated over the last five years to 14.1 per cent.

    However, the proportion of black and minority ethnic (BME) male teachers has risen to 17 per cent – which, for the first time, is broadly representative of the wider population at 16 per cent.

I may have missed it, but, surprisingly?, The Guardian appears not to have considered it worth reporting on at all.

Daniel Ream

When a person can't use the internet withOUT Google and Google is free to quash your ass for not being woke

I'm sorry, but neither of those things is true. And therein lies the problem; the people most affected by Big Tech's ideological biases are also the most ignorant of how the Internet works. The result is a populist mob demanding that the government step in and institute changes by force that will be much, much worse than the current state of affairs, all because the mob simply has no idea what it's shouting about.

It's really a very strange phenomenon. It's the equivalent of a mob shouting about how evil Ford is and how Ford is restricting consumer choice by only selling Ford vehicles, and demanding that government step in and Do Something about Ford's evil monopoly. And they're doing it while standing in the middle of an auto mall.

David
If there are political dramas, then they’re from a very definite perspective. If there are historical dramas, they’re not really about the past… It’s the present in fancy dress.

Peter Whittle and Philip Kiszely discuss the predictable trajectories of woke drama.

Captain Nemo

If there are historical dramas, they’re not really about the past… It’s the present in fancy dress.

I shall watch the interview later as I am not in a position to do so at the moment. But it's interesting how that snippet you've quoted mirrors the following, which I wrote on this blog about a year ago:

"I have thought for some time the only history that we are allowed to experience is the one a narrow clique of writers, directors, and casting editors wishes we had, as opposed to the one we actually had. Modern words and ideas in the mouths of people who would have found such views anathema.

David

Modern words and ideas in the mouths of people who would have found such views anathema.

I suppose it’s a result of culture being produced largely, in some areas almost exclusively, by left-of-centre people, with the same left-of-centre conceits and assumptions, and all of the vanities and blind spots that go with them. And as we’ve seen many times, people on the left seem much more inclined to signal their political subscriptions, regardless of incongruity. Hence the ham-fisted shoehorning and bizarre anachronisms.

Jim Whyte

It's the present in fancy dress.

Puts me in mind of a production of the Scottish Play in a post-nuclear-war setting, because (its director averred) audiences couldn't relate to medieval Scotland.

Whereas just everybody knows exactly what their world will be like after an exchange of ICBMs.

On John Cage, let me be the first wiseass at this establishment to quote Igor Stravinsky's review, "I look forward to more works, of major length." (A smackdown worthy of W.S. Gilbert or James Whistler.)

On Toobin, this is a treat for minds of a certain cast:

https://mobile.twitter.com/rysimmons/status/1318275865978036225

Jonathan

Re: ... the predictable trajectories of woke drama.

We Wuz Peter Pan 'n Alice in Wonderland Too!

Steve E

We Wuz Peter Pan 'n Alice in Wonderland Too!

Ooh, it's time to play Literary Racial Mashups™.

Next up Huckleberry Finn and Of Mice and Men wherein a young recalcitrant black boy travels the Mississippi River on a raft with a mentally challenged, naive giant.

George

You're perfectly entitled to think that mashing up Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan is a stupid idea and if that's your problem with the film, then fine. But that clearly isn't the problem of a lot of the people posting comments under that trailer. It's a good thing that people of non-European racial background should nonetheless feel that they belong to this culture and that they have a stake in it. Would you be happier if they all pissed away the rest of their lives keepin' it real? And if encouraging that sense of belonging involves a bit of imaginative casting, then I for one think it's well worth it.

John

Cultural appropriation a one-way street as usual.

I hope they cast real Indians.

Darleen

I'm sorry, but neither of those things is true.

Engineer Dhruv Mehrotra built a virtual private network, or VPN, for me that prevents my phone, computers, and smart devices from communicating with the 8,699,648 IP addresses controlled by Google. [...]

Google is a behemoth when it comes to maps. According to various surveys, the vast majority of consumers—up to 77 percent—use Google Maps to navigate the world. And a vast majority of companies rely on Google Maps’ API to power the mapping on their websites and apps, according to data from iDataLabs, Stackshare, and BuiltWith. [...]

In its Maps API, Google has long offered a free or very cheap product, allowing it to achieve market dominance. Now it’s making a classic monopolistic move: Google announced last year that it’s raising its mapping prices significantly, leading developers across the web to freak out because Google Maps is “light years ahead of its competitors.” [...]

In some cases, the Google block means apps won’t work at all, like Lyft and Uber, or Spotify, whose music is hosted in Google Cloud. The more frequent effect of the Google block though is that the internet itself slows down dramatically for me.

Most of the websites I visit have frustratingly long load times because so many of them rely on resources from Google and get confused when my computer won’t let them talk to the company’s servers. On Airbnb, photos won’t load. New York Times articles won’t appear until the site has tried (and failed) to load Google Analytics, Google Pay, Google News, Google ads, and a Doubleclick tracker.

Google now resembles the vertical monopoly of Ma Bell. Banning a person from YouTube is like old AT&T cutting your long distance and removing your leased-phone. Good luck using the "competition."

Darleen

Someone should think twice before having grandma look after the grandkids.

Steve E

Would you be happier if they all pissed away the rest of their lives keepin' it real? And if encouraging that sense of belonging involves a bit of imaginative casting, then I for one think it's well worth it.

How condescending of you.

George

How condescending of you.

What a stupid, glib reply. First of all, my comment was provoked by the literal Nazis (note the references to the 'Austrian painter') in the comments under the trailer. Secondly, there's nothing condescending about wanting to encourage genuine integration. Thirdly, I'm all for the casting of anybody in any role; the moment we start watching any film or play we suspend our disbelief, so a blonde Othello is fine by me because it's just one more irrelevant detail. It's a civilisation that we should be in the business of preserving, not some perverse ideal of racial appropriateness. And yes, it has to work both ways. All identitarians, of the left-wing or right-wing persuasion, are dicks.

Steve E

What a stupid, glib reply.

Not as stupid as your belief that a movie is going to save "them" from "pissing away the rest of their lives keepin' it real?" "They" are real adult people who don't need your sanctimonious posturing on "genuine integration."

ComputerLabRat

Funny how "keepin' it real" becomes so important to those very people when accusations of "Acting White" arise... A lot of the Oppression is coming from right in that crab bucket with them, and no amount of identarian pandering from Hollywood or anywhere else is gonna stop that.

Pooklord

Next up Huckleberry Finn and Of Mice and Men wherein a young recalcitrant black boy travels the Mississippi River on a raft with a mentally challenged, naive giant.

That actually sounds like a really good mashup.

Also,

George, Steve: Hush! You'll wake the barkeep.

David

Hush! You’ll wake the barkeep.

[ Bangs on wall. ]

Lousy kids, with their jeans and their rap music.

George

I'm not so thick as to think that one movie is going to save anyone from anything. What I do think is that, over time, a culture that doesn't insist on sticking people in racially appropriate boxes (something which the 'woke' are just as guilty of as 'traditional' racists) will reap the benefits in terms of social cohesion and of just plain happiness. A black English kid is no less 'appropriate' in the role of Peter Pan than a white American kid voicing Christopher Robin. Both are just fine. And a black American kid would be fine too. You know what annoys the hell out of me in the 'debate' about casting Cleopatra? It's that people think it even matters what colour she was. We know that the idea that she was a black African is ahistorical nonsense but even if she had been black that shouldn't mean that she has to be played by a black actress.

Steve E

George, Steve: Hush! You'll wake the barkeep.

Good advice. I think I'll follow it. Apologies to the barkeep.

George

Apologies to the barkeep too. And for my first, intemperate words to Steve (and they were my first; my initial comment wasn't directed at him at all.)

Steve E

And for my first, intemperate words to Steve (and they were my first; my initial comment wasn't directed at him at all.)

My apologies to you too George for misunderstanding your comment.

[ Air hugs and handshakes all around ]

Darleen

We know that the idea that she was a black African is ahistorical

What "we" are you talking about? While everyone with even a passing acquaintance with American history knows George Washington was white, so Hamilton is just a novelty, relatively few people know that the Cleopatra of plays and movies was both the 7th to carry that name and was Greek. Not Egyptian nor sub-Saharan African.

Personally, I have no issue with going with the best actor acting the role - with caveats. For example, what with 40% of young people having no clue what the Holocaust was, to remake Schnidler's List and casting black and Korean actors into the roles of the Jews would severely cripple the audience and be a slap in the face to the Jewish community.

David

[ Air hugs and handshakes all around ]

[ Looks up from game, wipes tear from eye. ]

George

@Darleen (note my return to deliberately and explicitly making it clear who I'm replying to...)

The 'we' I'm talking about is the 'we' that encompasses anybody who has ever made any sort of honest effort to learn anything about the historical period in question. I know that it's a 'we' that probably excludes the overwhelming majority of people.

And I agree with you on the caveats: if the racial/ethnic dynamics are actually key to the story being told, then casting should take account of that. For that reason, Steve's example of Huckleberry Finn is a valid one. That doesn't have to mean slavishly (excuse the term 😊) colour matching actors to roles but at least being aware that the coherence of the story itself could be affected by an insensitive choice.

Richard Cranium
Election simulation. Dumb bastard misunderstood the meeting agenda. It can happen, I suppose.

Golf clap. Well played!

Pooklord

Election simulation. Dumb bastard misunderstood the meeting agenda. It can happen, I suppose.

Or the dumb bastard is really, really perverted.

Sue Sims

I don't think that a blond actor playing Othello would work, given all the references to his cclour throughout the play ('An old black ram is tupping your white ewe', etc). And while colour-blind casting can work perfectly well, there can also be pitfalls. I once saw a production of Lear by the RSC in which Lear, Goneril and Regan were all white, and Cordelia was black. I spent an awful lot of the play devising scenarios where that would have been possible (for instance, Cordelia being the daughter of a second wife) rather than being caught up in the action.

Darleen

Facebook demonetizes Babylon Bee cuz riffing on an old Monty Python skit may "incite violence."

No joking in Wokeistan allowed.

Horace Dunn

Regarding Cage and his 3'44.

I would certainly agree that Cage put out a lot of music where the "idea" behind the music is to some degree interesting, challenging or stimulating but the music, in execution, seems rather pointless. It simply doesn't work. I would, however, make a case for 3'44.

I once attended an orchestral rendition of the piece (and just by making that statement, one is highlighting one of its pleasing absurdities). It was included in a concert with rather more mainstream pieces. As an experience it was odd, unsettling and, I have to say, amusing. Cage was a joker. He wasn't being po-faced when presenting the world with 3'44. An audience is required to go through all the usual rituals (applaud when the orchestra leader comes in, applaud the conductor etc) and then sit while nothing happens. At the end the conductor bows and the end-of-perfomance rutuals are adhered to, applause, orchestra stands and is applauded etc. And during the piece you realise that silence is impossible (this was one of the aspects that Cage himself talked about). You start hearing things going on outside the hall. The audience gets increasingly fidgety as minute follows minute. Everybody feels a little bit self-concious. It's certainly an experience that I'm glad I had.

By the way, Prager's curt dismissal of all atonal music shows him to be something of a philistine. I understand why much of it isn't to everyone's taste, but there is some fine, inventive and sometimes even beautiful music to be heard that would fall under the rubric "atonal".

Sam Duncan

“On Toobin, this is a treat for minds of a certain cast:”

That reminds me of the old Punch caption competition. Someone used to enter every week with “I keep thinking it's Tuesday”, the actual caption to a Paul Crum cartoon from 1937.

I think that was rather the point, in fact. The absurdity of Crum's gag means that it can be applied to almost any picture. It occasionally won the competition.

Hal

Regarding Cage and his 3'44.

My favorite presentation.

Steve E

I spent an awful lot of the play devising scenarios where that would have been possible (for instance, Cordelia being the daughter of a second wife) rather than being caught up in the action.

I'm with you Sue Simms. There are times when I've gone into the theatre already confused by the proposition but found my concerns to be unfounded and other times when I've spent the play distracted by the implications of the changes. For example, one of the best versions of the Tempest I've seen had Prospero played by a woman. While one of the worst versions of A Midsummer's Night Dream that I've seen had both marriages done as gay marriages with the leads played by black and white actors. It was a change that just didn't work in a play that is already filled with twists.

Steve E

RIP Spencer Davis.

Gimme Some Lovin'

Daniel Ream

Engineer Dhruv Mehrotra built a virtual private network, or VPN

Okay. I'll break it down for you.

Let's start here. Buy a brand new laptop. Take it home, plug it in, go through the setup.

Now there's an 85% chance you've just bought a Windows laptop. So that laptop is running Microsoft Windows, not Android. No Google so far.

Fire up the default web browser. Notice that you're using Edge, not Chrome. Again, no Google.

Perhaps you'd like to search the Internet for something? Type your query into the search bar. You're not using Google, are you - you're using Bing, the default search engine for every version of Windows (and the XBox, if you care about that sort of thing).

In fact, in order to use Google at all on your new laptop, you have to take deliberate action to install a Google product on your system. Fun fact - this is exactly what Microsoft was sued for by the DOJ back in 2001!

Google is a behemoth when it comes to maps.

No argument there. But there are lots of companies that don't use Google's Maps API at all because it doesn't offer the specific features they need (I work for one of them) or - ironically - because it doesn't work in China.

In some cases, the Google block means apps won’t work at all, like Lyft and Uber, or Spotify, whose music is hosted in Google Cloud.

So two apps which are absolutely dependent on a Maps API - okay - and an extreme outlier app that happens to run its back end services in GCP, unlike 94% of the market using cloud hosting.

The article you're referencing is deliberately cherry-picking its examples to make Google look more inescapable than it is.

Most of the websites I visit have frustratingly long load times because so many of them rely on resources from Google and get confused when my computer won’t let them talk to the company’s servers. [...] Airbnb [...] New York Times [...]

...so she's using an adblocker, then? This has little to do with Google specifically and everything to do with the dysfunctional ad-supported web business model. Sites like Airbnb and the New York Times deliberately design their sites to fail if you're using an adblocker so that you'll turn it off, thus ensuring they get their ad cash. Sites that aren't ad-supported design their front-ends to be tolerant of individual components being blocked. Sites that are ad-supported are ad-supported because they don't have a functional business model in the first place. Or are you proposing that Airbnb has put Trivago, Expedia and Hotels.com out of business?

Here's the intro that you didn't include:

I’m apprehensive about entirely blocking Google from my life because of how dependent I am on its products; the company has basically taken up residence in my brain somewhere near the hippocampus.

Google Calendar tells me what I need to do any given day. Google Chrome is how I browse the internet on my computer. I use Gmail for both work and personal email. I turn to Google for every question and search. Google Docs is the home of my story drafts, my half-finished zombie novel, and a running tally of my finances. I use Google Maps to get just about everywhere.

Alternate Headline: Person Who Chose to be Completely Dependent on Free Google Services Finds Not Using Free Google Services Any More Kind of a Pain. Also, the other four articles in the same series talk about the same experiment being run with Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Microsoft. They all have the same breathless "OMG It ruined my life" tone, which is a strong indicator you're looking at clickbait (since the gizmodo headline wasn't enough indication). I might point out that if there are five big companies all competing in the same space, by definition that means none of them have an inescapable monopoly.

Google Docs is the home of my story drafts, my half-finished zombie novel, and a running tally of my finances.

This is not a typical person. This is not a serious person.

Banning a person from YouTube is like old AT&T cutting your long distance and removing your leased-phone.

This is ludicrous hyperbole and you know it. There are dozens of alternative video/livestreaming hosting services, and anyone can set one up themselves from scratch with a modicum of technical knowledge. What it won't be is free; instead of Google paying you for your unboxing or makeup tutorial videos, you're going to have to pay for the storage space and bandwidth costs yourself. That's what people are really shrieking about; their free stuff's being taken away and they don't like it.

Again, the fundamental problem here is that the people shrieking about Big Social do not understand how the Internet works, and do not want to learn.

There is, in fact, a very serious problem with Big Tech, but it isn't this drivel. It's the collusion between dozens of disparate companies that don't operate in the same market to deplatform people like Andrew Torba. Torba has been on the receiving end of more Big Tech oppression than anyone, and he doesn't think regulation is the answer.

Daniel Ream

one of the best versions of the Tempest I've seen had Prospero played by a woman.

That would be woke Stratford's offering last season, I'm guessing. I can't see it myself; Prospero's character is entirely driven by the fact that he is a father of a naive, young and nubile daughter. Making him a mother screws with the whole dynamic.

It's like their version of Othello, where they costumed Emilia to look like one of Othello's soldiers/lieutenants rather than Desdemona's handmaiden. It makes no sense, and it confused the hell out of the person I took (who was not terribly familiar with the play, and couldn't understand why Iago's wife was both serving under Othello as a soldier and hanging around Desdemona all the time).

Jonathan

. A black English kid is no less 'appropriate' in the role of Peter Pan

The problem is that there's no such thing as 'Black English'. England, which literally means 'Land of the English', was brought into being over a thousand years ago when the first King, Alfred, was crowned as the homeland of the English people. Being English is not a club one can join, it is decided by who your ancestors were. Africans, Asians and Middle-Easterners are not English - even if they were born in England.

Alex

Jonathan, by that logic, would you say that the royal family isn't English? After all, they're descended from William the Conqueror, a Norman, and more recently from a family of German princelings.

asiaseen

Being English is not a club one can join

In that case very few of us qualify as being "English", starting with the royal family. The people of England are descended from a long series of immigrant "invasions". The English are a mixed race, and, indeed, the "English" of King Alred's time were themselves a mix of immigrant origins. Does the description Anglo-Saxon ring any bells?

@ Alex
Given the numerous changes of dynasty since 1066, I would very much doubt there is any Norman blood in the present royal family.

George

@Alex

Absolutely. But I have absolutely no intention of attempting to engage with the likes of Jonathan.

David

If anyone has trouble with comments not appearing, email me, top left, and I’ll rattle the spam filter. Which is again being capricious.

Jonathan

The people of England are descended from a long series of immigrant "invasions". The English are a mixed race,

Celts, Angles, Saxons, Jutes, Vikings and Normans all come from a small area in Northwest Europe, the Romans left no genetic trace here.

But I have absolutely no intention of attempting to engage with the likes of Jonathan.

How surprising.

Alex

The Celts come from "a small area in Northwest Europe"? They were spread across the continent. The Galatians, for example, were of Celtic descent, and they lived in Turkey.

As for "the Romans left no genetic trace here," try https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/04/11/did-romans-leave-genetic-legacy-britain/, where at least in southeast England they did.

Steve E

Prospero's character is entirely driven by the fact that he is a father of a naive, young and nubile daughter. Making him a mother screws with the whole dynamic.

That's what I thought going to see the play. But I found that it worked. Martha Henry is what made it work despite the role of her daughter Miranda being played in a too shrill and whiny manner. She was captivating in the role. The play was also technically well staged and created an excellent atmosphere for magic.

YMMV

Eric Brown

Fire up the default web browser. Notice that you're using Edge, not Chrome. Again, no Google.

Except that Edge is now based on Chromium for website compatibility. Oops. Nice try, though.

Daniel Ream

Nice try, though.

Nginx is based on v1.3 of Apache and yet somehow they're two different companies competing for the same market niche.

don't know how the Internet works and don't want to learn

Mark Kovacic

Daniel Ream

Nginx is based on v1.3 of Apache and yet somehow they're two different companies competing for the same market niche.

Interesting non-sequitur, it is irrelevant to the fact that ALL modern browsers are built on the chromium core, and not all use the switch that removes googles tracking and reporting code from the body.
The pretense that because there is no google software loaded on ones computer, means that google is not involved in the use thereof is a bit thin.
What modern computer user does not immediately begin browsing the internet? And when doing so was stated,blocking google cripples a majority of websites, because they use all the "free" tools that google provides. Those tools being provided so that google can track the users browsing habits.
You arguments are built on a computer usage pattern that has not existed since the early 90's. People are often looking for passive consumption of media, and the revenue model for such is, and has been, ad driven.
Sites that do not directly market a service, are almost entirely supported by ad revenue, and the largest revenue system for ads is the Alphabet entities.

Steve E

it is irrelevant to the fact that ALL modern browsers are built on the chromium core

Firefox? Safari? Tor Browser? Pale Moon?

Maccaligan

RIP Spencer Davis

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