David Thompson
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December 08, 2020

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David

Right, I have episodes of Larry Sanders to watch, and then sleep. This week’s Ephemera should materialise in a couple of hours.

Barry Homan

You haven't the slightest idea how tough it is. Every day, you get covered in mud, dirt and shit, back-breaking work, and you can never, ever take a frigging vacation or a day off

Ah, but you see, I do. I live on a 100-year-old farmstead, we run a plant nursery there, with only one employee who just makes floral arrangements. You just described my daily routine in your post. Up at 6, unending chores, loads of maintenance, delivering flowers, cleaning ditches, replacing roofs, burning weeds, killing moles, repairs needed everywhere. The fun never ends, and I still travel 5 hours to occasional casting calls where I seldom make the final cut. Plus practice and rehearsing on my own stage act. The one day in the week we're closed is the day we can finally get some work done. Vacation? What's that? We're open all year round. I take it all in stride, and still stand by my original post. Acting IS tough, just try it.

WTP
Imagine my irritation when in a college class it was taught that the One True Way of interpreting Turn of the Screw...

Heh...of all the books for you to mention...that was exactly the first book that I was assigned that I didn't bother to read. 11th grade English class. I decided to do a little experiment as I was never pulling better than a C+. I thought, "What if I just listen extra careful in class to what teacher says, not let any of my own interpretation into the picture, maybe skim the Cliff Notes a little, and let's see what happens." Sure enough, I get a B (B+ IIRC) on the test. Don't remember squat about the book as I do recall the reason I picked that one to experiment with was that it seemed very uninteresting to me. I figured I'd probably never finish reading it anyway so why bother even starting to read it?

WTP

Also, God bless you Cloudbuster. You saved me (and likely several others) a lot of aggravation.

WTP

Fixed? Sorry about that. Could have sworded I previewed. I had an ellipsis twixt backslash i and backslash blockquote...maybe that threw me off?

WTP

Or did Barry Hoffman do this to us? Hmm....

WTP

Or Barry Homan...whatever...

Baceseras

[It was a gallant attempt, however unsuccessful.]

Baceseras

(meaning mine, not yours WTP.)

Baceseras

I mean, yours was both.

Baceseras

Gallant and successful, that is.

(positively final effort to clarify)

Richard Cranium

You haven't the slightest idea how tough it is. Every day, you get covered in mud, dirt and shit, back-breaking work, and you can never, ever take a frigging vacation or a day off

Ah, but you see, I do. I live on a 100-year-old farmstead, we run a plant nursery there, with only one employee who just makes floral arrangements.

There's a reason why it's called "work" and not "happy fun time".

I must admit that I've never seen the draw to go into a line of work where my level of success is directly proportional to how much I cannot be like myself. When I'm in a bad mood, it's phrased more along the lines of being in a line of work where I have to lie so convincingly that other people believe that I am someone else.

Obviously, the last sentence is an over-simplification of acting. Nonetheless, a good actor is capable of making me believe that I'm dealing with some other human being. Gary Oldman, for example, is a human chameleon; outside of acting, he may well be a straight-up person. Even so, I'm not certain that I'd believe anything he told me. YMMV.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Also, God bless you Cloudbuster. You saved me (and likely several others) a lot of aggravation.

I don't know, between someone who produces food and an actor/flower arranger, this has all the makings of a one sided Four Yorkshiremen skit.

"Mucking out a dairy barn at 4AM - luxury - we were picking flowers in the snow, uphill both ways, with naught but barbed wire on our bare feet for traction, AND, while reciting Hamlet".

Hal

The near unanimous, nearly singular perspectives of the themes and such sounded a little too similar.

Better or worse than coming to a text with preconceptions from literary criticism that are so strong that the actual text is smothered even when it's read?

Vimes gingerly picked out the little scroll and unrolled it. It was covered with meticulously written but unfamiliar symbols. What made them particularly noteworthy was the fact that their author had apparently made use of the only liquid lying around in huge quantities.

“Yuk,” said Vimes. “Written in blood. Does this mean anything to anyone?”

“Yes, sir!”

Vimes rolled his eyes. “Yes, Constable Visit?”

“Visit-The-Infidel-With-Explanatory-Pamphlets, sir,” said Constable Visit, looking hurt.

“‘The-Infidel-With-Explanatory-Pamphlets * ’ I was just about to say it, Constable,” said Vimes.

“Well?”

“It’s an ancient Klatchian script,” said Constable Visit. “One of the desert tribes called the Cenotines, sir. They had a sophisticated but fundamentally flawed...”

“Yes, yes, yes,” said Vimes, who could recognize the verbal foot getting ready to stick itself in the aural door. “But do you know what it means?”

. . . .

“It’s ancient Cenotine, sir. It’s out of one of their holy books, although of course when I say ‘holy’
it is a fact that they were basically misguided in a...”

“Yes, yes, I’m sure,” said Vimes, sitting down. “Does it by any chance say ‘Mr. X did it, aargh,
aargh, aargh’?”

. . . .

“Besides, I looked at other documents in the room and the paper does not appear to be in the deceased’s handwriting, sir.”

Vimes brightened up. “Ah-ha! Someone else’s? Does it say something like ‘Take that, you bastard, we’ve been waiting ages to get you for what you did all those years ago’?”

“No, sir. That phrase also does not appear in any holy book anywhere,” said Constable Visit, and hesitated. “Except in the Apocrypha to The Vengeful Testament of Offler,” he added conscientiously. “These words are from the Cenotine Book of Truth,” he sniffed, “as they called it. It’s what their false god...”

“Could I just perhaps have the words and leave out the comparative religion?” said Vimes.


---Terry Pratchett, Feet Of Clay


Oh, whether right wing or left wing or “literary" instead of actually just reading the text, it's all the same variety and quality of “discussion”. . . . . .

Fred the Fourth

Poor, dear woman...

[Jots down "statement issued from safe 15000 kilometers distance." ]

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