David Thompson
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March 02, 2021

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David

And I suppose we mustn’t forget this little gem.

sk60

But they remained silent at the event, as did everyone else, out of “respect.”

When you start lying it's hard to stop.

David

As noted in the post linked above:

I sometimes wonder if the Clown Quarter of academia might actually be a massive and rather perverse behavioural experiment, the point of which is to see just how credulous and mentally deformable human beings are.

Or to see just how neurotic and dishonest they can be made to be.

David

When you start lying it’s hard to stop.

Not entirely unrelated.

And also, this.

Again, wokeness is stupefying. It corrodes a sense of realism.

Squires

When you start lying it's hard to stop.

...to see just how neurotic and dishonest they can be made to be.

Fear is a hell of a drug.

J West

The problem with providing (free) post-secondary education to Indians is that they take their arts degree or their watered-down law degree and immediately go to work in the 'Federal Indian industry' where they can lobby for more FREE Indian stuff and more vilification of the white man.

Everyone must assimilate or there will never be a true Canadian culture. Everyone needs culture. It is communists who are devoid of culture. A country can only have one culture is that country values peace.

Stephanie Richer

That reminded me of a time I walked into a voodoo shop in New Orleans. The fellow behind the counter spotted the camera I was holding and lectured me sternly that I could not take any pictures because it would anger the spirits and cause bad mojo, most of which would follow me and cause calamity in my life. I nodded and as much of the shop was not within his visual line of sight at the counter, where he was comfortably ensconced with his lunch and graphic novel, proceeded to take pictures regardless.

I’m still waiting for the promised woo to catch up with me. I hope that mother is not still waiting on the corn pollen to work.

Jen

Readers will note that the beneficiary of this “respect” is the peddler of primitive woo, the one being deferred to as a quasi-magical being, some kind of leprechaun. Not the mother whose child was in need of medical attention

That.

David

That.

Well, it is, I think, rather symbolic of progressive attitudes more generally. In that, attendees seem to have been much more concerned with appearance, with seeming - and with not being denounced by their peers as low-status racists – than with suggesting anything that might actually help. In this case, might help a child in need of medical attention, and presumably in pain.

David

I’m still waiting for the promised woo to catch up with me.

You ended up here. Just sayin’.

anon a mouse

It's simple, really - you're all using an outdated woo.

Us "indigenous" folk are on ver 6.3.

Killer Marmot

The Desperately Woke will eat this stuff up like granola, and come away thinking they're terribly enlightened and open minded.

But when diagnosed with cancer, they'll be on time for every single appointment at the oncology clinic.

Connor

the elder stated that the parent should “rub corn pollen on his feet and do a sunrise ceremony.”

If it doesn't work it isn't 'medicine' or 'knowledge'.

Karl

When I was a younger man I hated the idea of the world continuing without me and hoped it would end when I did.

These days I'm not sure I'll live that long...

David

These days I’m not sure I'll live that long...

I do like to leave readers feeling warm and fluffy inside.

David

Instead of “readers,” I almost wrote “my regulars,” but that had… unhappy connotations.

Thomas

And they can have ceremonies in which they can burn grass in a no smoking government building. My buddy promptly whipped out some sacred tobacco and lit one up and got in deep doo doo. Respect!

Daniel Ream

When you start lying clapping it's hard dangerous to stop

Fixed that for you.

I should probably note that the actual Indians in the Indian industry in Canada are fully aware that what they're spouting is complete bollocks. It's all just part of the game by which they extort money and concessions from the government.

NEO

*
Reg: "All right, but apart from the sanitation, medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, the fresh water system and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?"

Attendee: "Brought peace?"

Reg: "Oh, peace - shut up!"

*

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Somewhat related: Guardian columnist denounces Western medicine as “outdated,” champions use of bush dung.

We all know western medicine sucks, like everything, Chinese is much better.

Sam

These professors deserve to lie awake contemplating the suffering of that child every night for the rest of eternity. Though I'd bet they sleep like babes. Fucking sociopaths.

anon a mouse

by which they extort money and concessions from the government.

*contemplates moving to Canada. Looks at temperatures. Nope....
Hey, how about a casino!*

aelfheld

Isn't utopianism just another form of magical thinking?

[+]

a poster promoting a similar event instructed women to skip the ceremony if they were menstruating.

No feminist meltdown?

anon a mouse

feeling warm and fluffy inside.

Hmm. Aren't we supposed to skin rabbits before cooking and eating?

Alex DeWynter

feeling warm and fluffy inside.

Hmm. Aren't we supposed to skin rabbits before cooking and eating?

Not sure he was talking about rabbits. sideeyes sausage roll, which seems to've edged closer

anon a mouse

FWIW, said pollen tripe is nothing new...
"Deacon Paula Hansen, a native Navajo and deacon in the Episcopal Church, led us in prayer and the traditional corn pollen blessing"

https://diocese-oregon.org/navajo-corn-pollen-blessing-at-sunrise/

Darleen

they remained silent at the event, as did everyone else, out of “respect.”

Somehow I believe if invitee had been Gwyneth Paltrow and she talked about the health benefits of a warm jade egg up the vagina, respect isn't the word that would be in use here.

anon a mouse

she talked about the health benefits of a warm jade egg up the vagina

The script for Mulan III just writes itself, huh?

Liam

If it doesn't work it isn't 'medicine' or 'knowledge'.

But I've been told political correctness is just about being polite. /sarcasm

Daniel Ream

The script for Mulan III just writes itself, huh?

You owe me a new monitor.

David

just about being polite.

Sarcasm aside, I understand the reluctance to be impolite, and there have been any number of situations in which I’ve bitten my tongue to avoid causing a scene or derailing a social gathering. (Shockingly, tragically, my interactions with other people aren’t always about me.) But when this inclination is combined with condescension and an obligation to flatter, and then wrought as institutional policy, resulting in a Designated Victim Group whose protected status hinges on a display of arrested development… well… dishonesty and farce are hard to avoid.

cayleygraph2015
a poster promoting a similar event instructed women to skip the ceremony if they were menstruating.

No feminist meltdown?

Feminists want every excuse to skip that ceremony, just like real people.

Heinz

But they remained silent at the event, as did everyone else, out of “respect.”

At a talk in college given by an authentic Buddhist monk, I sighed and rolled my eyes along with most of the room when one audience member, a representative of a student Christian group, insisted on dragging the discussion from the lovely warm bath of generic Eastern Wisdom into difficult theological concepts, and further spoiled the empathetic vibe of the night by suggesting that the Buddhist notions that we're all really One and that suffering is an illusion might make Buddhist people and cultures more and not less callous than Christian people and cultures.

Like a lot of the student audience, I was attached to an idea of myself as a smartass and skeptic. I was inclined to nitpick teachers and think highly of myself for doing so. If the talk had been by a Christian monk our ignorance of theology wouldn't have made us too embarrassed to ask impertinent questions. We were in an institution dedicated to Reason as the way of cutting through the weeds of tradition and adjudicating claims by competing authorities in a complex world. But all of that was left at the door when we went into the domain of exotic indigenous wisdom.

Maureen from Regina

No big surprise here - the Canadian government and the Indian industry has been playing games for decades, at the root of it all is how much money can the Indian industry squeeze from the government or other institutions - such as universities. Results (as in improving the lives of indigenous people) is irrelevant. I think I have a solution, but it will never happen. The Canadian government spends annually about $15 billion on indian programs - housing education, health, social services, etc. etc. etc. While Canadians have a responsibility to ensure indigenous people have a good life, that doesn't mean it has to be a bunch of expensive programs that never have any results. My solution is to double the amount annually that goes to indigenous people BUT the catch is that it is given directly to individuals, band councils, tribal councils whatever - the only government involvement is 4 or 5 people who write the cheques every April. The indigenous community can decide how they want to split up the money (give them a year to come up with a formula). The other catch is that it is entirely up to them on how they spend it. BUT if they run out of money before April 1 each year, that is sad, but don't come back to us. If the indigenous authority getting the money decides to spend it on housing - go at it; decides to spend it on education - go at it; decides to spend it on traditional knowledge medicine - go at it; if they decide to spend it on spending everyone to Mexico for 7 months each year - go at it. I'm 65 - at one time I used to care - I NO LONGER CARE. The Indian industry has told white people for decades that only they know how to deliver services to indians and they could do a better job. This approach allows you do that - have at it. But if it all goes tits up, don't blame me and I don't care.

David

But all of that was left at the door when we went into the domain of exotic indigenous wisdom.

I’ve mentioned before a supposedly serious astronomy documentary that opened with a fawning audience with a group of aboriginal Australians. The blathering was inane and utterly devoid of both scientific content and discernible relevance, and yet there was a hush of profundity. It was absurdly indulgent, as if These Magical Brown People were privy to the very secrets of creation. We, the audience, were presumably supposed to ignore the inanity of it, the air of condescension, and the sudden, quite dramatic, drop in standards.

WTP

Canadians have a responsibility to ensure indigenous people have a good life

While Canadians are free to impose that responsibility on themselves, let's not pretend it's universal. The opportunity to create a good life for themselves, just as other citizens have? Most definitely. But one cannot ensure that other people have a good life. It's simply impossible.

anon a mouse

You owe me a new monitor.

*bows, then heads for exit while eyeing henchlesbians...*

Steve E

While Canadians are free to impose that responsibility on themselves, let's not pretend it's universal.

Canadians are obligated by treaty to make provisions for Indians (the word is used in treaties and government acts) whether that obiligation includes "have a good life" is debateable not to mention how that phrase translates from an 18th and 19th century perspective to today.

The opportunity to create a good life for themselves, just as other citizens have?

Indians are not Canadian citizens in the way non-indigenous Canadians are citizens. They are essentially wards of the Crown (today the government). Turdeau the First offered to scrap the Indian Act and make Indians full-fledged Canadians with all the inherent rights and responsibilies. They turned it down.

I blame England.

[ Looks east across the Atlantic. Shakes fist. ]

exdemocrat

Reminds me of Attenborough's excruciatingly embarassing pandering effort in his recent Great Barrier Reef documentary (see here for the blow-by-blow account https://subsaga.com/bbc/documentaries/science/great-barrier-reef-with-david-attenborough/episode-1.srt - scroll down to about 245). In which we learn that the reef was in fact formed by a stingray angered by being speared, and that we must be incredibly grateful that this vital knowledge is available to us via aboriginal song and dance.

Stephen J.

I have to admit that every time I hear some official M.C.-type at any public event repeat the "We acknowledge we are on the shared land of the Mississauga tribe" or similar platitude, I find it harder and harder to resist jumping to my feet, grabbing the microphone, and just demanding of the audience, "Is a single person here prepared to sell their home at far below market price to an indigenous Native person and move all their family back to Europe? No? Then SHUT UP. You want to apologize for the crimes of previous generations without making actual restitution, be my guest, but STOP MAKING THE REST OF US SIT THROUGH IT."

Unfortunately I am far too Canadianly polite (read: cowardly) to ruin everybody else's evening with this kind of stunt.

Steve E

"Is a single person here prepared to sell their home at far below market price to an indigenous Native person..."

Oddly enough the Indians were prepared to do just that. After the Crown purchased land from the Mississaugas and granted its use to Six Nations the first thing Joseph Brant tried to do was sell prime plots to white settlers.

David

[ Looks east across the Atlantic. Shakes fist. ]

[ Peers through enormous atomic binoculars, squints. ]

Oh, there’s someone waving. That’s nice.

[ Waves back. ]

Sam

Attenborough's descent into blubbering fool has been sad, as watching his older stuff with my parents are treasured memories.

Ditto Jeremy Clarkson, while we're on the subject of be-jowled goofs who've become twattish self-parodies.

Steve E

When does "traditional healing medicine" become folk remedies and old wives tales.

My eastern european grandmother had a bag of traditional healing medicine that was just as goofy as the corn pollen cure. My favourite was her cure for warts which included rubbing said wart with luncheon meat (my grandmother preferred bologna) and then burying the meat in a secret place in the backyard. Of course, it had to be done at night and the moon had to be full. I've never had a wart so I haven't been able to test it.

So, who's wooing who.

David, it would appear that, if my fist shaking did anything, it freed me from the dreaded mark of Hal. I like this blue avatar.

pst314

"My favourite was her cure for warts which included rubbing said wart with luncheon meat..."

"Aha! Talk about trying to cure warts with spunk-water such a blame fool way as that! Why, that ain't a going to do any good. You got to go all by yourself, to the middle of the woods, where you know there's a spunk-water stump, and just as it's midnight you back up against the stump and jam your hand in and say:
  'Barley-corn, Barley-corn, injun-meal shorts,
  Spunk water, spunk water, Swallow these warts.'
and then walk away quick, eleven steps, with your eyes shut, and then turn around three times and walk home without speaking to anybody. Because if you speak the charm's busted."
--From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

pst314

Ditto Jeremy Clarkson, while we're on the subject of be-jowled goofs who've become twattish self-parodies.

How many years back must I go to find the fun Jeremy Clarkson? I've seen only a few excerpts from Top Gear, but my local library has DVD's of most of the seasons.

WTP

vital knowledge is available to us via aboriginal song and dance.

One of my desperate routines to chill and get to sleep is to read moderately interesting, yet not quite too interesting, items on Wiki. I try to avoid the overtly controversial. The other night I somehow meandered to Tasmania and eventually this page on Aboriginal Australians in which I learned "Aborigines and Papuans diverged from each other genetically earlier, about 37,000 years BP, possibly because the remaining land bridge was impassable, and it was this isolation which makes it the world's oldest civilisation.". Now this was news to me. As I understand it, a civilization is "the stage of cultural development at which writing and the keeping of written records is attained". Now you (or more correctly, David Attenborough) tell me this knowledge is available by song and dance? Is there nothing written down? No written "record", shall we say, of this momentous event and/or myth?

"My favourite was her cure for warts which included rubbing said wart with luncheon meat..."

In my day it was a potato. You would cut a potato in half, rub it on the wart, then bury that half of the potato in the back yard. Oddly, that didn't work either. Don't ask me how I know.

Sam

Per Critical Drinker, The Boys S2 was enjoyable but jumbled with woke messaging threatening to derail the series. Drinker can be a bit sensitive to these things but overall we share the same tastes.

Per Robot Head, manbaby neckbeards should man up and not be lone shooters and people in general should see this brilliant show as the cutting satire that it is. Besides, Nazi's were integral to early American spaceflight so it's not woke. Or something. Not his best video though he's a great reviewer.

I don't trust Amazon with, well, anything past Season 1 so I was going to skip it per usual. Thoughts?

David

Thoughts?

Had a few, a while ago.

Squires

...rubbing said wart with luncheon meat (my grandmother preferred bologna) and then burying the meat in a secret place in the backyard.

Your grandmother couldn’t think of a simpler way to engage in secret bologna snacking.

...suggesting that the Buddhist notions that we're all really One and that suffering is an illusion might make Buddhist people and cultures more and not less callous than Christian people and cultures.

It is unimaginable how anyone could have come to such a conclusion. Callousness? In my East Asia!

Sam

Had a few, a while ago.

Ah...I see the usual suspects also weighed in.

[ dons Hat of Shame ]

Instincts are useful things. In [current year] you will not be wrong by being too cynical.

Daniel Ream

Indians are not Canadian citizens in the way non-indigenous Canadians are citizens. They are essentially wards of the Crown

Canada is an apartheid state. That's not hyperbole or sarcasm; we are literally an apartheid state by any definition.

I find it harder and harder to resist jumping to my feet

I routinely shout out "but you're not going to give it back, are you?" at this point. At first there were shocked gasps, and there are certain theaters I am no longer allowed to patronize. Of late I have been noticing less shocked gasping and more snickering and suppressed chuckling. So I suspect people are starting to get fed up with the hypocrisy.

Thoughts

The deconstruction of superheroes has been going on since long before Marvel movies became popular, and it's just as tedious and juvenile as "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex" or Farmer's deconstruction of Tarzan. Deconstructionists hold their audience in contempt; they honestly believe that the rubes think this stuff is real, like late night infomercials and professional wrestling, and need to have their illusions shattered for their own good.

Suffice it to say that after being inundated with gritty, shades-of-gray superhero deconstruction over the last couple of decades, I'm inclined to think ill of the whole genre.

Jay Guevara

“Western Medicine vs. Traditional Healing Medicine.”

Great. We should encourage traditional healing medicine. Sometimes Darwin needs a boost.

bobby b

"Readers will note that the beneficiary of this “respect” is the peddler of primitive woo, the one being deferred to as a quasi-magical being, some kind of leprechaun. Not the mother whose child was in need of medical attention"

Should also note that the beneficiary of any "affirmative action" policy is never the bad-doctor's patient, the bad-engineer's bridge, the bad-lawyer's client, the bad-teacher's students, or the bad-government-workers subject.

It all becomes form over content. We used to do content. No more.

Maureen from Regina

"Canadians have a responsibility to ensure indigenous people have a good life" - I probably should have clarified. The Canadian government has a treaty obligation to indigenous people (but we shouldn't assume that should be a whole range of government run programs that do nothing). But I do want to see indigenous people have a good life with opportunities - just like I want to see anyone have a good life. But for indigenous people, the barrier is not the Canadian government or Canadians but their own leadership who demand that indigenous people don't do anything on their own (and believe the silly mantra of traditional healing/medicine). My brother lived next to an indigenous family - husband was Cree from the Prairies and wife was from a west coast band - neither lived on their 'reserve' or depended on their band for anything. They pay homage to their culture and supported their aging parents, but as far as they were concerned the reserve politics was toxic and if they had stayed they would have become nothing instead of leaving and becoming a skilled in demand tradeperson and a nursing manager.

David

Ah...I see the usual suspects also weighed in.

Heh. As I said, I enjoyed season one. Not outstanding or anything, but entertaining enough. Season two less so, mainly because of pacing issues, thinness of plot, and the fact that nihilistic gore grows tiresome pretty quickly. It is, or was, fun, of a kind, but, like you, I don’t think of the series as “cutting satire.”

Still, it was more engaging than WandaVision.

WTP

I do want to see indigenous people have a good life with opportunities - just like I want to see anyone have a good life.

As do I. I have spent considerable time in volunteer efforts to help people help themselves. Yet every time these efforts eventually run up against people who don't understand the basic socio-economic factors that make that happen. This desire to just give people stuff and think that that will solve the problem. It doesn't work that way. It fails time and time and time again because it addresses the wrong problem. In a free society, Normal, healthy people are not materially poor because they lack material things. They are poor because of a poverty of hope, of reason, of soul. Yes, even the dumb ones. The number of "smart" people whom I have known who are failures out number the "dumb" ones I know who are moderately successful. I don't think my experience is unusual.

Daniel Ream

The number of "smart" people whom I have known who are failures out number the "dumb" ones I know who are moderately successful. I don't think my experience is unusual

Dr. Jordan Peterson's popular books are not particularly clever, sophisticated, or even insightful, consisting mostly of common sense and experience. Native IQ will not substitute for hard-won life experience of the type that used to be passed on within the family.

In my personal experience, I've seen an awful lot of smart people torpedo their chances in life precisely because they think they're smarter than the "common folk wisdom".

pst314

Dr. Jordan Peterson's popular books are not particularly clever, sophisticated, or even insightful, consisting mostly of common sense and experience.

Yes. His value lies in the fact that forthright common sense is now so rare and so hated:
"In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act."

And that recalls an authentic comment Orwell made:
"The really frightening thing about totalitarianism is not that it commits 'atrocities' but that it attacks the concept of objective truth."

Steve E

"The really frightening thing about totalitarianism is not that it commits 'atrocities' but that it attacks the concept of objective truth."

I know what Orwell was trying to say but too many people have no idea of the atrocities commited under totalitarian regimes. I've had conversations where I've talked about death toll under communism and people just stare at me doubtfully. Atrocities are the logical outcome when there is no objective truth and despite the evidence all around us too many people can't see what happens when the authorities have to be infallible.

Oh no! I see in the preview screen my avatar is back to the mark of Hal. Me and my damned hubris.

tolkein

In my day it was a potato. You would cut a potato in half, rub it on the wart, then bury that half of the potato in the back yard. Oddly, that didn't work either. Don't ask me how I know.

It does work. I was 17 and desperate.

Alex DeWynter
Dr. Jordan Peterson's popular books are not particularly clever, sophisticated, or even insightful, consisting mostly of common sense and experience.

Yes. His value lies in the fact that forthright common sense is now so rare and so hated:

One of my favorite Aba & Preach videos is them discovering their common-sense philosophy of not getting spun-up over stupid sh*t has a name.

WTP

Don't underestimate the value of Doing Nothing, of just going along, listening to all the things you can't hear, and not bothering.

A. A. Milne
--------
All that needs to be done for evil to prevail is good men doing nothing.

Edmund Burke
=======

I'm confused...

pst314

I'm confused...

Roscoe

It would be easier to accept this kind of crap if the purveyors crushed their iPhones,threw out their TVs, got rid of their snowmobiles, atvs, cars and trucks, nylon outdoor gear, guns, white bread, publishing in non-indigenous languages, Crisco, air travel, wooden houses with central heating, polio vaccines,Hot Pockets and Nacho Cheese Doritos, steel harpoons and fishing hooks,anything made from aluminum,steel,or copper,deodorant,emergency rooms,toothpaste, and everything else they did not invent with their traditional ways of knowing.

This goes for the rest of the braying cultural appropriation jackasses. IF you are wearing pants, socks, and underwear, you are stealing my culture.

pst314

as tedious and juvenile as "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex" or Farmer's deconstruction of Tarzan

"Man of Steel..." should have remained an item in a fanzine, but too many fans liked it too much. (Fans. Shrug.)

I never read Farmer's Tarzan and have no idea what it's like, but the half dozen books I have read were less than impressive and I long ago stopped paying attention to glowing reviews.

On the other hand, what did you think of the Gil the ARM organlegger stories? Current events seem to make them good candidates for a movie.

Daniel Ream

I never read Farmer's Tarzan and have no idea what it's like

Basically, it's "Tarzan would have tried to have sex with chimps and apes as a teenager and would have had no problem eating human flesh" (in the original books, he has an instinctive revulsion for it). Never mind the whole "would have gotten eaten five minutes after birth" problem, we're just going to gloss over that. It's the whole problem with a genre deconstruction; to make it clear you're deconstructing it you have to retain some of the conventions, but then there's really no point to the exercise: so you think these genre conventions are silly and trite and unrealistic, but these other ones are just fine and dandy, so why do we have to accept your judgement on where the line gets drawn? I just wanted to watch some pro wrestling and boo the bad guys.

the half dozen books I have read were less than impressive

Do you mean Burroughs' Tarzan or Farmer's other works? I'll freely admit I find Burroughs a bit of a slog to get through. It feels like the Barsoom books should be more exciting than they are.

Gil the ARM organlegger

I know I read them when I was in high school but I have almost no recollection of them beyond the central conceit. I'll give them another go.

Maybe we can start a book club. Church this place up a bit.

Apropos of absolutely nothing I've been re-reading Andre Norton and I was quite amused by how much the early parts of Sargasso of Space read exactly like Harry Potter IN SPAAAACE. If they made a movie out of it critics would be sniffing at its use of the formula.

PiperPaul

IF you are wearing pants, socks, and underwear...

Heh. My normal attire for reading Guild of Evil posts is only one of these and I'm not telling which.

David

[ Rings tiny silver bell. ]

Fetch more paper towels.

Steve E

Fetch more paper towels.

And lysol, lots of lysol.

pst314

Apropos of absolutely nothing I've been re-reading Andre Norton and I was quite amused by how much the early parts of Sargasso of Space read exactly like Harry Potter IN SPAAAACE. If they made a movie out of it critics would be sniffing at its use of the formula.

Funny thing: I was recently listening to an interview with the late Terry Pratchett who remarked in passing that some critics/reviewers declared that he had been strongly influenced by Harry Potter, not knowing that he came first.

pst314

Maybe we can start a book club. Church this place up a bit.

As long as we don't worship the writers. (David, might you install a gentler behavior modification device in the correction booth for fans who go squee?)

Speaking of reading, Terry Pratchett mentioned that in his youthful reading he ran across Henry Mayhew's London Labour and the London Poor and that this (as well as Dickens) influenced his writing. None of the local libraries have a copy (!) which means that I'll have to ask them to locate one through WorldCat.

pst314

Basically, it's "Tarzan would have tried to have sex with chimps and apes as a teenager and would have had no problem eating human flesh

Oh Good Lord. Let me guess: there were pornographic sex scenes (Farmer wrote some other pornographic sf stories.) Am I right?

pst314

Do you mean Burroughs' Tarzan or Farmer's other works?

Farmer. I haven't read Burroughs since my early teens, although I still have a dozen antique hardbacks in my library and intended to take another look to see how they stand up.

It can be interesting to re-read the books of one's childhood and see which are still enjoyable. Tolkien stands up well. Likewise some boy's biographies of famous Americans such as Daniel Boone and Ben Franklin. About 20 years ago I tried re-reading some Andre Norton and Lester Del Rey stories and was disappointed.

Daniel Ream

It can be interesting to re-read the books of one's childhood and see which are still enjoyable

There are some books that are timeless classics, and some books that we thought were awesome because we were eight years old and had no taste.

I find Andre Norton to be awfully dull, although I think much of that is a problem with a lot of Golden Age SF: at the time it was the first time anyone had ever done these story elements and the novelty was enough. By now, though, we've seen these same tropes used over and over again such that when Norton takes a good three chapters slowly revealing that the Witch World protagonist Is Not In Kansas Any More, we're impatiently muttering "yes, he's in a different dimension, we get it, move on already". The Solar Queen series fares better, probably because while Scoundrels & Starships has been done to death, Legitimate Businessmen Trying to Make A Buck hasn't quite.

Susan Cooper's The Dark Is Rising quintet is still good, I think, as long as you take into account that the early books are for very young readers and so use extremely simple language. I find C.S. Lewis to be unreadably smug these days. J. D. Fitzgerald's The Great Brain series is still fun, although I doubt Scholastic is pushing it these days.

pst314

I find C.S. Lewis to be unreadably smug these days.

Uh-oh. He's on my list, too. I'd hate to be disappointed again.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

And lysol, lots of lysol.

Don't forget the UV light, can't tell if it is really clean without it.

pst314

Don't forget the UV light, can't tell if it is really clean without it.

pst314

Oh Good Lord. Let me guess: there were pornographic sex scenes (Farmer wrote some other pornographic sf stories.) Am I right?

I am indeed curious about this, in order to gauge the degree of inaccuracy in the book reviews I read when it was published. Slowly, over the years, I came to distrust sf book reviewers as tending to slant reviews to benefit their friends and those whose opinions they approved of.

Sue Sims

pst314: Project Gutenberg has all five volumes of Henry Mayhew: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search/?query=london+labour+and+the+london+poor&submit_search=Search

pst314

pst314: Project Gutenberg has all five volumes of Henry Mayhew

Thanks for the reminder: Project Gutenberg is wonderful; all sorts of treasures. In this case I requested via interlibrary loan, in order to get away from the computer screen.

Daniel Ream

I came to distrust sf book reviewers as tending to slant reviews to benefit their friends and those whose opinions they approved of

The appropriate rejoinder to Sturgeon's Law is that crap is still crap and I don't want to read it.

I'd hate to be disappointed again

It's a bit ironic when reading, say, The Screwtape Letters and the protagonist is describing those kinds of newly-minted Christians who swagger about in their newfound moral certainty, all the while the condescension drips off the page.

Brian Snelling

Back to warts. In Kent in the1950’s my mother swore that she rid me of warts by “selling them to the gypsies“. The gypsies received precious metal(Silver or gold) and agreed to take your warts.
Later, as an adult, walking in the bush in British Columbia a friend pointed out a plant called Indian Pipe. It looks like a fungus but is actually a plant lacking chlorophyll. He said It was used originally by Local Natives as a specific against warts. I asked him how it was used and he did not know so I rubbed some against some warts on my forearm and completely forgot about it until a week later when I noticed the three warts were gone.
Who knows?

pst314

Maybe we can start a book club. Church this place up a bit.

How about a recurring thread on "books and movies to buy before they get cancelled"?

Daniel Ream

Here in Soviet Canuckistan, it's still possible to buy this.

NateWhilk

In my day it was a potato. You would cut a potato in half, rub it on the wart, then bury that half of the potato in the back yard. Oddly, that didn't work either.

Obviously you used the wrong half.

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