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October 27, 2021

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pst314

Note that it isn’t an invitation to ponder whatever issues the writers of the thing feel should bear down upon us, their own tangle of assumptions and pointedly avoided realities. Instead, it’s a set of instructions.

Even mere invitations would be grossly out of line from an employer.

pst314

Oh, bollocks. I swear your reply wasn't there when I typed the above.

New posts do not appear when you click Preview or Post. Only when you refresh the page.

ccscientist

The myopic focus on US or Brit racism as if it were unique in the world is absurd. Every nation in history had slaves. It was not even about race--it was who you could conquer. It was the brits who spent decades and a fortune waging war on the atlantic slave trade and the US that fought a war over it--credit where credit is due?

The "land" dialogue thing is also absurd. You cannot undo history. Every place on earth has experienced conquest at some point, maybe many times. We try not to do that anymore, though Russia is looking expansionist these days.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

...though Russia is looking expansionist these days.

TBF, given that Siberia is part of Russia, and that is where the "indigenous" North Americans came from, this is nothing new...

Sam Duncan

“Man sings.“

“If you're cis and you won't date a trans person, then you're a transphobe”.

Okay, I'll add it to the list: heights, disease, spiders, crazy people.

WTP

These are the questions you will beg, and this is how you will feel, or pretend to feel, like we do.’ The presumptuous overreach is eye-widening. Imagine the kind of personality that could write those demands, proof-read them, circulate them, and still not feel absurd. Or pretentious. Or indeed creepy.

I have been in a few creepy business environments. People just conform. Jane Elliott style diversity class loaded with obvious (to me) things-that-never-happened, this was before Snopes, and people just sit quietly through it. Don't raise a fuss. The creepiest to me was a failing government project where our meetings, twixt three remote locations, never had the camera on the meeting leader/speaker. Cameras were pointed to the worker bee audiences while a disembodied voice informed us about the progress, or lack thereof, that we were making. Never saw the speaker. What made it most creepy, no matter how bad things were going and how little feedback was going back up the chain (worst of any project I ever worked), near as I could tell I was the only one who found it creepy/weird. Of course I was new to the project that had been going on at that volume of workers for 3 or 4 years so I was more of a fresh frog in the pot. And they were mostly Gen-X workers. Though they would speak privately about how bad the project was going in general, especially the absurd deadlines, horrible leadership (one team leader was known to break down crying in her office...and I had to work somewhat closely, if remotely, with her), horrible development strategy, and excessive overtime. But not too loudly as to make any difference.

Mark

Also, if you’re immersed in the “LGBT community,” in which browbeating people into dysfunctional, doctrinaire and coercive relationships is apparently considered an act of piety, perhaps it’s time to rethink your choices and find better company.

That.

Daniel Ream

[Ivy] completed her PhD from University of Waterloo in Philosophy in 2012

If I recall correctly, that was about the time the various professors at St. Jerome's (the attached Catholic liberal arts college) began to retire en masse. I expect that's not a coincidence.

Not just say "no", but also counterattack

I have referred to this as "normalizing the phrase 'no, and fuck off'".

“And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand?... The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin's thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt! If...if...We didn't love freedom enough. And even more – we had no awareness of the real situation.... We purely and simply deserved everything that happened afterward.”

The "land" dialogue thing is also absurd

Any time I am subject to these I shout "but you're not going to give it back, are you?"

There are always muffled laughs in the audience.

Darleen

At a supplement company, a Gen Z worker questioned why she would be expected to clock in for a standard eight-hour day when she might get through her to-do list by the afternoon.

Oh, that's not just Gen Z. That's the "just-enough-to-get-by" employee from every generation. I had a least a couple here and there who always came to me about 2 or 3 pm asking to leave for the day because they were "done" with "their stuff".

I always asked, "Have you asked anyone else on your team if they need help? Or I have a lot of other things that need to be done if you aren't busy." Or I'd tell them they had to use vacation time for the hours missed.

Frustrating.

And I was the kind of supervisor who was always to work with employees-in-need to flex hours where needed.

David

Any time I am subject to these I shout “but you’re not going to give it back, are you?”

As a rule, it takes quite a bit of provocation to make me disrupt a social gathering. I don’t generally like to cause a scene, and a non-woke version of The Blurting doesn’t appeal to me. But we are, I think, reaching a point where near-continual and quite loud derision does seem warranted, and perhaps necessary. To break the spell, as it were.

Geezer

https://www.haggardhawks.com/single-post/2015/03/25/Eleven

I got "PAGE NOT FOUND"
Try this:
https://www.haggardhawks.com/post/2015/03/25/eleven

Sam Duncan

“Try this:”

79 multiplied by 12? Give me a minute...

79 dozen.

I like the cut of these chaps' jibs.

Bo

Tubi has both The Detectorists and Father Ted free - with commercial breaks.

Also check out White Van Man.

pst314

This looks like Hell. Via here, where it is commented "wait i'm wrong, even in neal stephenson's wildest feverdream he still had windows on all the residence tower rooms"

Would it be impolite to suggest that the 97 year old billionaire who imposed this design should himself be stuffed in a tiny windowless pod and fed bugs until he changes his mind?

WTP

This looks like Hell

Meh. I've worked in worse environments, spending 10-11 hour days there, 6 days a week. Sometimes 7. No windows, 10 minute walk to the closest window, through two cypher doors. A skinny window that overlooked a loading dock. Sure, if you walked another 3 minutes or so there was a nice view. But by that time, what with return trip, train of thought was lost. Of course I had a computer monitor through which I could view the internet world. A small cheap one with crappy resolution. Beige 6cubical shared with a guy who was a bit of a jerk. Security environment, so bringing in my own was not an option. OTOH, plenty of headroom, unlike say a submarine, and six figure salary, decent health insurance, matching 401k so...still damn near went crazy.

These kids will be in and out of the dorm all day. It's just a place to crash. Wouldn't be for me though. I was stupid enough to go to college once. Certainly not dumb enough to repeat the experience. Nor would I encourage others to do so.

WTP

Not sure what happened there... maybe html didn't like apostrophes? Alternatively stated...spelled out in words...
"Beige six foot by five foot (IIRC) cubical..."

Farnsworth M Muldoon

This looks like Hell.

Eight people sharing one crapper and one shower, yeah, that is going to work swell.

Pooklord

This looks like Hell.

I never realized how good I had it as a college undergrad -- I feel sorry for todays yutes and the crappy world they are entering.

Uma Thurmond's Feet

The university I went to had 10-story towers. Eight concrete-block rooms to a side. Each person had half the room, big enough for a bed, desk and closet. There was a window. All 16 students shared a bathroom with 3-4 stalls and a shower room with multiple shower heads. We did have a window.

Like people said, we spent most of our time out of the room. Considering the students are going to be there four months at a time, it's not going to be too bad. But, damn, $1.2 billion? And he only contributed a measly $200 million?

Of course, it's California. Can't let the market supply the demand there.

Uma Thurmond's Feet

Meanwhile, white supramacists caught acting like Democrats in Virginia.

NateWhilk

For folks in the USA, you might have access to hoopladigital through your local library. hoopladigital also has Father Ted AND the Detectorists. Re the latter, Diana Rigg's daughter, Rachel Stirling, appears in almost every episode.

David

Diana Rigg’s daughter, Rachel Stirling, appears in almost every episode.

Ah, the vicar’s wife in The Murder at the Vicarage. I thought I knew the face.

What?

Hey, I’m familiar with the white-knuckle adventures of Miss Marple.

WTP

and the US that fought a war over it--credit where credit is due?

No, no. The US fought a war over states' rights. Certainly not over slavery. If you say that war was over slavery, well you're just a dumb, dumb ignorant dummy who wasn't properly educated. See how that works?

Ted S., Catskill Mtns, NY, USA

Any time I am subject to these I shout "but you're not going to give it back, are you?"

I like to point out that the so-called "First Nations" are the ones that ethnically cleansed the Zeroth Nations to points further south.

anon a mouse

reaching a point where near-continual and quite loud derision

Well, I do have a bit of a reputation for laughing out loud. While pointing.

I've found it remarkably effective over the years...

Steve E

Re the latter, Diana Rigg's daughter, Rachel Stirling, appears in almost every episode.

I did not know that. I know her from The Bletchley Circle and saw her most recently in an episode of Midsomer Murders. My wife didn't like the Detectorists so we stopped watching half way through the first episode.

Rach

even in Neal Stephenson's wildest feverdream he still had windows on all the residence tower rooms

It seemed that the 1960's hippies had thoroughly won their cultural war against 1960's technocrats, but those technocratic ideas - Le Corbusier machines for living, nuclear power, factory-made food - are making a comeback as a means for the first world to address its moral obligations simultaneously to lower the carbon footprint, birthrate and economic expectations of its own people, and to build megacities to accommodate third world immigrants.

...would qualify as the eighth densest neighborhood on the planet, falling just short of Dhaka, Bangladesh.

... utterly detached from its physical setting

... out of place with the scale and texture of the rest of campus

... an alien world parked at the corner of the campus, not an integrally related extension of it.

.. will long outlive the circumstances of its origin and will impact the life of the campus and the lives of its students for multiple generations.

That's the pattern of mass immigration. Pod living, and not only for students, is just one way the pattern embodies itself in every aspect of life. And yes, it's for ever.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

My wife didn't like the Detectorists...

Nekulturny!

Steve E

Nekulturny!

Da

Baceseras

1960s hippies . . . against 1960s technocrats

The hippies of the 'sixties weren't wrong to put a wrench into the technocracy; but their favored tool was magical thinking. And a woozy idea came to their aid from far-out anthropology: that magic is primitive technology -- and primitive is not a pejorative term.

Jerome Rothenberg called primitive poets "Technicians of the Sacred" -- everything from Gilgamesh to Oh-Wah-Re-No and beyond: his anthology was a hippie bestseller, and it's still in print.

Meanwhile the hippie poet Richard Brautigan dreamed of a coming peace-and-happiness, "all watched over by machines of loving grace." Hippie magic would become the new technology, and from it would come a new technocracy unlike the old technocracy.

It takes a vague and cloudy thought process just to leave such ideas unhooted, and that much cloudier to earnestly pursue them. Alas, the climate of our time has favored the pursuit. At a drowsy pace, to be sure, which incidentally masked the goal or made it seem no real threat. The faith in hippie magic has been internalized, poeticized: never or seldom expressed in frank terms that could be refuted.

True believers, some of them at least, may know that utopian dreams in the past have turned murderous. But they feel that this time will be different. They feel that Real Utopia has never been tried

pst314

Meanwhile the hippie poet Richard Brautigan dreamed of a coming peace-and-happiness, "all watched over by machines of loving grace." Hippie magic would become the new technology, and from it would come a new technocracy unlike the old technocracy.

Ursula K. Le Guin had a similar dream which she described in her Always Coming Home/Kesh stories.

pst314

It seemed that the 1960's hippies had thoroughly won their cultural war against 1960's technocrats...

And yet the hippies' embrace of primitive technology was somewhat ambiguous: For instance, there was much enthusiasm for Paolo Soleri's Arcologies.

Richard Cranium

@pst314, I visited one of those arcologies in the late 1990s. When I mentioned that they could perhaps do IT type work instead of creating bells, the response was similar to the response they would have had I if had said they could use the entrance as an open latrine.

So, from my limited experience, those arcologies are as primitive as idiot humans that live in dense cities think things should be.

MC

These are political tomatoes. This is political tomato sauce.’

Reading that NYT article, 2 things struck me. 1 - all the companies mentioned were dead certs for the B ark. 2 - the owners and managers of those businesses seemed utterly incapable of exerting authority over their employees; it didn’t seem to even occur to them. Instead we have experienced adults worrying about whether the youngsters who work for them think their emojis are cool.

pst314

So, from my limited experience, those arcologies are as primitive as idiot humans that live in dense cities think things should be.

Thanks, I never did visit. The most I did was attend a lecture and slide show by a hippie student who was enthusiastic about them.

One of the first things I noticed was that there was little room for individuality in the arcology he proudly showed us: No individual homes, only apartments in large planned structures. And massive concrete structures at that.

So...hippie primitivism combined with Soviet Central Planning?

pst314

Ursula K. Le Guin had a similar dream which she described in her Always Coming Home/Kesh stories.

I was struck by how enthusiastically many radical feminists embraced the utopia described by those stories.

pst314

Hey, where is everybody?

[ looks for key to shed where David keeps the bush-whomping machine ]

pst314

Meh. I've worked in worse environments

Sorry to hear that. But that doesn't make that dorm less awful.

These kids will be in and out of the dorm all day. It's just a place to crash.

Not really. I spent many hours studying in my dorm room. And relaxing, listening to music, reading for pleasure, or talking with a friend or two.

Also, those dorm rooms all use built-in furniture. There is no chance to personalize a room beyond hanging a few pictures etc. In contrast, some of the residents of the dorms I lived in replaced the beds, brought their own desks, and so on.

Again, I do not want to live in a pod, and I do not want billionaire tech oligarchs training kids to live in pods.

semi retired conservative

Again, I do not want to live in a pod, and I do not want billionaire tech oligarchs training kids to live in pods.

Architects Against Humanity
https://twitter.com/arch_crimes

@arch_crimes

Sam Duncan

“... falling just short of Dhaka, Bangladesh.”

It's always Dhaka, isn't it? Never Manhattan, whose population density is, as near as dammit, identical (75,000 people per sq.mi.).

I'm not saying that the building is any good, just that... well, there are lies, damned lies, and statistics. Having the same population density as Dhaka doesn't in itself make someplace a shithole.

I mean, sure, we can argue about Manhattan's shitholosity till the cows come home. But the point is, whatever else is wrong with it, it's certainly not like Dhaka. The vast majority of its 75k-per-square-mile live comfortably. Therefore, by the same token, whatever else is wrong with Dhaka, it can't simply be population density.

Bangladesh as a whole has the eleventh highest population density in the world, behind such overpopulated hellholes as Monaco, Singapore, Gibraltar, the Maldives, and Bermuda. It's just ahead of Guernsey in 12th place.

David

Reasons to dislike Microsoft, #262.

“Your settings are out of date” barks an ominous alert. “There is a problem with your account.” Turns out the ‘problem’ is that I’ve chosen not to swap my existing calendar for the Microsoft calendar, which is inferior.

This alert repeats every couple of days.

Darleen

Also, those dorm rooms all use built-in furniture. There is no chance to personalize a room beyond hanging a few pictures etc

IOW a prison cell ... where at least there is a window for natural light.

pst314

Architects Against Humanity

Yes, good one.

IOW a prison cell

In the glorious woke green future, everyone will live in a prison cell. Larger cells with more amenities will be available to those of greater economic value and greater political fervor. Only members of the Inner Party will have detached homes, cars, personal electronics and appliances, and so on. And everyone will be happy. Or else.

pst314

Reasons to dislike Microsoft, #262.

I think you left off a few zeros. #262,000 maybe?

If there is a large tech company which does not deserve hatred, I have not heard of it. IT technology gives amoral people so many more ways to do wrong.

WTP

Also, those dorm rooms all use built-in furniture. There is no chance to personalize a room beyond hanging a few pictures etc., etc.

Oh, don't get me wrong. It does look like a hell-hole to me as well. As stated, that project I worked nearly drove me crazy but everyone else was cool with it...on the surface. The miserable griping and complaining about work from people who otherwise seemed pleasant was a tell. But hey, they were willing to take it just as these college students will. I'm sure the place will look (somewhat) appealing for the first semester or two. But over time, the standard destructive behavior of (mostly) college freshmen will degenerate the surroundings. The built-in furniture being far more difficult to replace/maintain/upgrade. The whole thing looks like a communist human warehousing project to me. But that's what these people (say they) want. Curious if/who they are paying of to get this past the fire warden.

On another note, over at Ace the book thread spoke of a book coming out regarding The Battle of Castle Itter. Ace's link to the actual book was broke but the gist of it is as the war was winding down, a small unit of the Wehrmacht joined forces with a small US tank unit to fight 100-150 Waffen-SS and save many French and other prisoners (some Czechs, etc. loaned out from Dachau) including Charles de Gaulle's sister, a French tennis star, and couple former PMs, and liberate a small Austrian town. Seems like a story ripe for a Hollywood movie yet in all these years, sooo many WWII movies, especially prison escape movies, this is the first I've ever heard of it. Anyone else here WWII buffs heard of this? Daniel Ream, you were a tank guy right? Or have I mixed you up with Richard Cranium again?

David

I think you left off a few zeros.

I leave a more technical appraisal to others, but it seems to me that if you have to deceive your customers into using your products – instead of, you know, making better products - then something is amiss.

WTP

Turns out the ‘problem’ is that I’ve chosen not to swap my existing calendar for the Microsoft calendar, which is inferior.

Well be careful. I got banned from ever asking Apple for help ever, ever again because I questioned (and supported someone else who questioned) why I MUST have Muslim holidays on my "American" calendar. An no, pointing out the calendar didn't have the 365 Hindu holidays either did not help my case one bit.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Seems like a story ripe for a Hollywood movie yet in all these years, sooo many WWII movies...

Preproduction.

CliffsNotes version.

Or have I mixed you up with Richard Cranium again?

Yes.

pst314

I'm sure the place will look (somewhat) appealing for the first semester or two. But over time, the standard destructive behavior of (mostly) college freshmen will degenerate the surroundings.

I hear that in the welfare housing in the banlieus of Paris, much use is made of concrete furniture.

pst314

if you have to deceive your customers into using your products – instead of, you know, making better products - then something is amiss.

Another kind of deception is to publish glowing but rather general descriptions of what an app can do, but "forget" to publish a User's Guide which describe exactly what the app can and cannot do. The hope is that customers will start using the app and only later (too late?) discover unfortunate limitations.

semi retired conservative

The inimitable Mark Felton has also covered the battle at Castle Itter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80ZyPeoDUqk

Baceseras

There are genuine primitive technologies that (just like modern technology) meet standards of function, design, fitness, and acceptability to the users. At their best these technologies embody sound principles; their appeal to the hippie ethic was that they came without the cultural accretions of our latter-day -- and ever-higher -- high tech. It was the accretions, not the tech, that the hippies despised.

The very first hippies were practical about the skills of living. They knew how to make and fix things, or to learn how, or to exchange with someone who knew. It was a personal choice to favor simplicity and "low-tech." They didn't want to change society, but to live differently in it. Not unlike the later survivalists going off-grid. If they romanticized themselves sometimes as a "primitive" tribe living unnoticed in the shadows of a towering "civilization" -- well, that was a fable told to amuse, or to tease out speculation: and must be taken lightly, or best not heed it at all.

But "the very first hippies" were very few in number. Definitely not a "movement." That came from the flood of publicity in glossy fashion magazines like Esquire, Ramparts, Psychology Today. They weren't, as they pretended, reporting on a trend, but drumming one up. After that, to be a hippie meant to wear the costume, smoke pot, flash "peace," smile and say "groovy."

I came along too late to have been an original hippie, if I was even inclined that way. But I met a few of the real ones. What they told me was, the hippie movement was over the minute it became a movement. At the time I put that down to old-timers chaffing a greenhorn. I wanted the hippie dream to be viable, even if it wasn't for me. But they were right, those old freaks, God bless 'em, it was over.

Anything original, if it garners attention, gets imitated. A failed imitation, dying, can kill its original. A successful imitation cannot fail to kill its original. Sic transit and so forth.

Uma Thurmond's Feet

Baceseras, the same thing happened to the "thrift movement." In the late 1990s, a woman, Amy Dacysyzen (pronounced "Decision") had a goal: to get married, have a lot of kids, and live off her husband's Navy pension. To share her ideas and maybe make a little money, she started a newsletter, "The Tightwad Gazette," in which she talked about frugality, saving money, and spending money only on things that you want, rather than what the culture thinks you want.

Over the years, her readership expanded, and by the time she stopped publishing (she had run out of things to say), she was mailing 100,000 newsletters a month, and hired local women in her small Maine community to get the thing out.

Well and good, but it also sparked the "simplicity" movement and that was eagerly taken up by New York media companies. Simplicity pumped for buying products to replicate what they thought the simple life should be, rather than simply making do with what you have and adding only when you need to (which, of course, doesn't make as much money for the advertisers to said simplicity magazines).

It was played out pretty quickly, but "The Complete Tightwad Gazette" is still for sale, and the advice is still powerful to anyone who wants to use it.

WTP

I tried the simple life. I found it's not so simple. I mean it's not like I had to beg or borrow. But now I live life like there's no tomorrow and all I've got I've had to steal. But that's how it is...living at a pace that kills. Consequently I've got no love. Well no love you'd call real. Nobody waiting at home, anyway.

Fred the Fourth

Ha, Uma.
Reminds me of the time I dissected a small waste bin to describe in excruciating detail how many parts it had. Part of my ongoing effort to point out reality to fuzzy romantics.
Damn thing had AT LEAST 30 parts, depending on how you counted.
And the brand name?
Simple Human.
Lol.
(Anyone remember the Whole Earth Catalogs?)

PiperPaul

Hey WTP, now do 'Beautiful Girls', willya?

Geezer

(Anyone remember the Whole Earth Catalogs?)

In one of my boxes is The Last Whole Earth Catalog (along with a Harold Hedd comic book).

Daniel Ream

This looks like Hell

Munger Hall, in comparison, is a single block housing 4,500 students with two entrances

That cannot possibly satisfy the fire codes.

non-woke version of The Blurting

You're not wrong. But as Mark Steyn says, politics is downstream from culture and we've reached the point where we're expected to simply nod along with these inanities (insert Dalrymple quote here).

Social graces are a form of Geneva Convention: as long as we all agree to play by the same rules of courtesy we can avoid the kind of scorched-earth arguments that lead to broken relationships. The left abandoned that convention decades ago; we've been treating our POWS to coffee and chocolate biscuits while they've been shoving bamboo splinters under the fingernails of theirs.

It's long past time to remind the Left of what the Geneva Convention originally meant: if you don't use poison gas on the battlefields, we won't nuke your civilian cities until they glow. But if you step over that line, we'll come back across it with MIRV-armed ICBMs.

pst314

It's long past time to remind the Left of what the Geneva Convention originally meant

Very long past.

Baceseras

Uma's Feet, so-called lifestyle coaching has been a marketing strategy since a little before the full-on 1980s. A smart cookie like Martha Stewart aimed for it. An honest broker, like Amy D., gets hoovered up. "Simplicity pumped for buying products," the instances multiply. When they were high-end mail-order houses, Brookstone's and Sharper Image offered desktop zen gardens, with a little brass rake for the certified pure sand. The mass popularity of yoga now is as an excuse to buy a cute new outfit....


Anyone remember the Whole Earth Catalogs
I do, thank you, and that prompts thought of Stewart Brand's How Buildings Learn (1994), in which he formulates an aphorism that can bear on the Munger Hall situation. A library doesn't need windows, a library is a window. (He doesn't mean a library building; he's talking about a room used as a library.) And the bearing is this: the residence hall's room-pods reminded me at first of my library carrel at university. A place to keep my books, and do a long-ish stretch of reading and writing in private. Long-ish and longer-ish: there were times I would have liked to stay overnight.

But that was in addition to my place of residence. It's monstrous to deny students the dignity of A Room Of One's Own.

pst314

Anyone remember the Whole Earth Catalogs

Yes, and the Whole Earth magazine. Sometimes interesting. Sometimes very very weird.

Stewart Brand's How Buildings Learn

Was that the one in which he criticized "innovative" architectures which ignored all the lessons learned over centuries? I seem to recall that he criticized geodesic domes for the hellish maintenance problems of all those joints: With no overhanging roof, leaks will be a constant problem.

Baceseras

criticized geodesic domes

I remember reading that but not where specifically -- it fits Brand's view though, so probably yes.

Frank Lloyd Wright's Johnson & Johnson Building leaked too, as I recall. In the Executive Conference Room to make it even better. I think when the firm's directors complained, Wright advised them to buy a bucket.

pst314

Frank Lloyd Wright's Johnson & Johnson Building leaked too, as I recall.

You can't expect an artist to bother with bourgeois concerns like leaking roofs.

WTP

Frank Lloyd Wright's Johnson & Johnson Building leaked too, as I recall.

Yes. And his famous Fallingwater house had the notorious cantilever problem. I see now where Wright enthusiasts are wordsmithing Wiki to shift the blame from Wright to wherever they can, either Wrights engineers or the construction engineers. Kind of a metaphor for the whole mess. But if you dig into the source material, Wright's ego appears to have been something of an obstacle. Some say short man's disease was a factor.

I have a friend whose new beau builds/refurbishes domed architecture buildings. We may be getting together with them this week. This might be interesting. Depending on how sober they plan to be.

Baceseras

You can't expect an artist to bother with bourgeois concerns like leaking roofs.

Don't get me started on Frank Gehry.

pst314

Don't get me started on Frank Gehry.

With a cat o' nine tails?

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