David Thompson
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December 03, 2021

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pst314

The above is on top of the common tendency for people's circle of friends to shrink as they age. Many elderly people become increasingly lonely as their lifelong close friends die off.

Squires

Family estrangement increasingly caused by Woke children

The atomization of society will continue until collectivism achieves utopia.

pst314

The atomization of society will continue until collectivism achieves utopia.

Going at least as far back as Karl Marx, who declared the family to be an enemy standing in the way of socialist utopia.

Squires

...who declared the family to be an enemy standing in the way of socialist utopia.

For all to be one, all must be no one.

Megaera

pst314: a friend of ours, a Ukrainian, several times mentioned in a somewhat negative fashion, what he called "Slav humor" ... challenged for an example he shrugged and described a farmer who somehow liberates a genie from magical captivity. The genie, to repay the obligation, tells him he'll give him anything he wishes for (one time), but that there is (of course) a catch: whatever he asks for, his neighbor down the road will get it double. The farmer, unhesitating, tells the genie, "I want to go blind in one eye."

pst314

Is it time to bring up such English delicacies as spotted dick?

That's another item I haven't seen lately on the International Food aisle shelves.

CMOT Amazon to the rescue

pst314

a friend of ours, a Ukrainian, several times mentioned in a somewhat negative fashion, what he called "Slav humor"

Heh. I've heard a few variations on that joke. The longest was told by Dave Allen. Speaking of which, some of his comedy routines can be found on YouTube, but no collections on Amazon. Too bad.

asiaseen

Jobs not on my shortlist: testing hippos for WuFlu

Belgian zoo hippos test positive for Covid

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-59516896

pst314

My political journey:

...except that I would change "2008" to "1980".

Richard Dale

Damn, that Geocities one creeped me out. Not because it reminded me of university, in the early days of the interwebs, but because I thought it was somehow finding my name when it came up with Dr Dale's Cyber Clinic.

anon a mouse

"CMOT Amazon to the rescue"

Perused linkage... Hmm. Amazon adds "Auntie's Steamed Puds" - also available in Chocolate.

*walks away*

pst314

Perused linkage... Hmm. Amazon adds "Auntie's Steamed Puds"

My God, I thought you were being silly but you weren't lying.

Jocelyn

But the BBC blindly accepts a BLM supporter as a reliable reporter of his parents' "white supremacy".

Scott says his mother recently tried calling him. But he texted her saying he’d only consider re-establishing contact with his children if she recognised her comments had been “horribly racist” and apologised. So far, he says she hasn’t done that. “Even if all those things happened, I would always limit what I tell them about my life and certainly supervise any visits with the kids. Unfortunately, I don’t see any of that happening.”

Related...

It’s up to you to set the parameters of your own grandkid strike. Maybe you’ll be satisfied if your parents prove to you, via voting booth selfie or supervised completion of an absentee ballot, that they voted for the sufficiently progressive candidate of your choice.
John

I hope the recipients of the grandkid strike respond to any such text with the highly effective “Off to the solicitors tomorrow to talk about my will”.

Steve E

My God, I thought you were being silly

From the recommendations on the same page: Poop Like a Champion Ultra Fiber Cereal. Reminds me of this vintage cereal ad from SNL.

pst314

From the recommendations on the same page: Poop Like a Champion Ultra Fiber Cereal. Reminds me of this vintage cereal ad from SNL.

Who could ever forget Colon Blow? And Quarry?

Also from the recommendations on that page: Eat a Bag of Dicks gummi candy. If there's one thing I appreciate about the internet, it's the subtlety and refinement. (As you can tell from some of my comments.)

pst314

Also: Puppy Uppers and Doggie Downers.

Darleen

Chickens roosting except for those who demand we not see the chickens.

Abdullah called Avant's killing "horrific and appalling" and said Black Lives Matter mourns with her family. But she said officials must not be allowed to use Avant's death or recent property crime to push for more policing, cash bail or other tough-on-crime measures that she said have been proved not to work.

"We need to think about what kind of economic desperation actually creates property crime and how do we get people out of that state," Abdullah said. "How do we create livable wage jobs? How do we create affordable housing?"

pst314

Chickens roosting

" 'The fact that this has happened, her being shot and killed in her own home, after giving, sharing, and caring for 81 years has shaken the laws of the Universe,' declared Oprah Winfrey"

Silly bint.

actual laws of the universe

pst314

Chickens roosting

The killer has a long criminal record and is into rap, gangs, and Rastafarianism. And that reminds me of another example of the moral blindness of liberals: A key component of Rastafarianism is racial identity politics. This should be a red flag, but liberals refuse to see anything problematic, although they can immediately see the problem with any white racial identity religion.

pst314

David, is this now the recommended "stay safe" attire?

pst314

Insufficient Christmas spirit.

Steve E

A key component of Rastafarianism is racial identity politics.

When you believe that Haile Selassie was the second coming of Christ all other tenets of your belief pale by comparison.

Steve E

David, is this now the recommended "stay safe" attire?

It's been a hard day's knight...

[ Hides behind pillar ]

Henry

Normally I'm opposed to surly negativism, but this is directed at influencers, instagram and tik-tok, so I'm sort of fine with it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iik6btbRXsw

see also
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIHKZLZfaTE
and probably the rest of the videos on that channel. Embrace the

WTP

Poop Like a Champion

Well, you're gonna need the Squatty Potty to do that properly of course...

David

[ Fixes up-bargled link. ]

WTP

Umm?

pst314

It's been a hard day's knight...

And you'll be sleeping like a log.

[ Pulls out cosh. ]

[ David pulls out comprehensive list of my sins. ]

[ Puts away cosh. Slinks out door. ]

sonny wayz

"How do you comprehend a wokeist?"

'Think of a normal person, and take away reason and accountability.'

I may not have gotten the quotes exactly correct.

pst314

How to stop a carjacking, part 1

pst314

That does, by the way, remind me of Niven's "The Deadlier Weapon".

WTP

Think of a normal person, and take away reason and accountability.'

ISWYDT. Heh.

pst314

'Think of a normal person, and take away reason and accountability.'

Also take away prudence, temperance, kindness, humility,...

Steve E

'Think of a normal person, and take away reason and accountability.'

Thank god it's Sunday night and the wife goes to bed early because of work on Monday, but isn't that the definition of a woman. At least that's what they said at the last meeting of the patriarchy.

Sorry, David has brought back all the "good" dishes. I've got boxes of Corelle everyday dishes in the trunk/boot of my car. Extra income in my retirement and all that.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

...because leftists are so intolerant.

Meanwhile, in Inglewood, California, wypipo look at books in a "black space" with predictable results.

Then one morning, glancing out my front window, I saw a young white couple stopped at the library. Instantly, I was flooded with emotions — astonishment, and then resentment, and then astonishment at my resentment. It all converged into a silent scream in my head of, Get off my lawn!

The difficulty appears to be the ytes looked at books, but didn't take any from the "black space", well, that and daring to be in a "black space".

What I resented was not this specific couple. It was their whiteness, and my feelings of helplessness at not knowing how to maintain the integrity of a Black space that I had created.

I guess the writer is a fan of George "Segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever!" Wallace.

Inglewood is predominantly Hispanic, BTW, and this histrionic should be denounced both for colonizing an Hispanic space AND culturally appropriating the wypipo's little libraries.

David

What I resented was not this specific couple. It was their whiteness,

When someone is fixated by race, and makes it their go-to topic of conversation, the thing around which their world is built, it’s generally a good idea to back away slowly and fumble for your car keys. Given that such people tend to be quite unpleasant. However, our betters appear bent on encouraging these preoccupations, and seem to imagine, all evidence to the contrary, that the phenomenon will be different, and somehow must be different, depending on the skin colour of the individuals in question.

But such is wokeness.

Darleen

The infantilization of college students continues apace

For many educators, these aspects are key to being trauma-informed. Carello notes that trauma-informed teaching is similar to other “anti-oppressive” best practices, like “safe spaces” and “pedagogy of discomfort.”

(snip)

“When students arrive to class, tired, hungry, stressed out, traumatized, marginalized, I consider that a valid way of knowing about their own lives,” she said in the workshop.

To mitigate trauma, Wood has used practices like starting class with meditation, leading breathing exercises, or holding class outside with puppies.

David

The infantilization of college students continues apace

For some reason, this came to mind.

Farnsworth M Muldoon

Seems legit, what could possibly go wrong?

Darleen
Yet my resentment was not analogous to the white resentment of generations past (and of now, I’d argue). White resentment has always been legitimized, and reinforced, by legal and cultural dominance, a dynamic evident in everything from the rise of Trumpism to the current battle against the political boogeyman of critical race theory.

What a racist a**hole that somehow thinks her racism is special and unique. She sneers at the "white flight" that allowed Inglewood to be predominantly black/Hispanic but also hates "white return". How dare young people look for housing bargains in "her" neighborhood if they are the wrong color.

She has met the KKK and it is her.

WTP

The infantilization of college students continues apace

Darleen, what you quoted came from someone at Penn State University, AKA (well, long ago) "Linebacker-U", not some backwoods community college or lefty-girly Brynn-Mawr (or however TF it's spelled). You really should point such a thing out. You see, out there in the world, somewhere "in the cloud" likely/even there are pictures of me as a young boy wearing a Penn State t-shirt, a sweater, and likely a football pillow so labeled in the background. I need to know this information so that I can Yezhov those pics. These things are important.

Meanwhile, 38 people in my immediate community found this story funny:

Many decades ago there lived a feral cat that would jump up on my truck at night and spray inside the hood vents. You can imagine what that smelled like and it only grew worse as the engine heated up. One night I forgot to roll my windows up and the cat sprayed in the cab. With that its fate was sealed.
I saw the cat walking around my house and armed with a high-powered pellet pistol I cornered it inside a walled patio. Cowering and desperate the cat asked, "What did I do that you would kill me?" Angrily I said, "This is for"...and rattled off his offenses. With those yellow eyes peering at me he asked, "Would you kill me for being a cat?
May you receive this story and it's message in the spirit it is given. Happy holidays.
Not one question or hmmm or anything. So it must mean something...right? Like maybe one of those coded messages that Nazi spies used to put in personal ads in Allied newspapers during the war?

pst314

However, our betters appear bent on encouraging these preoccupations, and seem to imagine, all evidence to the contrary, that the phenomenon will be different, and somehow must be different, depending on the skin colour of the individuals in question.

I'm sure you are right that some of these Smart People think it will be Different This Time, but I am also certain that as you move up the hierarchies of money and power you see that illusion replaced by a knowing, cynical use of such people as tools--catspaws--in a play for absolute power: They cultivate Antifa and BLM as their own equivalent of Hitler's Brownshirts and Mussolini's Blackshirts.

pst314

Speaking of which, has anyone done a thorough investigation of George Soros' background, to trace the likely roots of his malevolence?

Daniel Ream

begged students not to major in wildlife because there were no jobs--their honesty was refreshing.

Back in 2006, "Zed" Shaw (a famous Ruby-on-Rails programmer) penned an essay called "Rails is a Ghetto" in which he said that if all you know is programming, you'll be stuck in low-wage trivial coding jobs your whole life. If you know something else and a little bit of programming, you can write your own ticket for the rest of your life because there are tons of fields out there that could desperately benefit from automation and software engineering.

I tend to be very skeptical of all these Learn to Code/Teach Kids to Code initiatives, because they always focus on coding to the exclusion of anything else rather than teaching kids how to use coding to improve other things they know.

A former colleague of mine has a tidy side income from an app he helped develop that uses AI to help you learn how to play guitar better - he's a competent guitarist as well as a competent programmer.

By comparison, my current job is programming the web portal and analysis engine for sensors on industrial tanks of high-pressure gases. They've been having a terrible time getting the pressure => how much gas is left in the tank calculations correct and at one point I point-blank asked "what is the damn problem - it's just Ideal Gas Law with the CRC handbook constants for the specific gas mix and pressure ranges" and the devs all looked at me blankly. "Wait a minute - is there anyone here with even basic first year physical chemistry??" and the devs all looked at me blankly. I don't know how the hell a company that only does this ended up with no developers that know anything at all about the topic, but it's extremely common.

So whole there may not be a lot of jobs in the forestry or wildlife space, spend two years getting a programming diploma on top of those and a wide array of lucrative options become available.

Darleen

A former colleague of mine has a tidy side income from an app he helped develop that uses AI to help you learn how to play guitar better - he's a competent guitarist as well as a competent programmer.

The husband with a background in music, electronics and a smattering of programming (as well as years as a systems admin) is doing this from the ground up. Just getting ready for the coding of the voice cards stage.

David

The husband with a…

I’m tempted to ask exactly how many husbands Darleen has.

Tempted, yes, but not foolhardy.

David

[ Decides to check something or other in the cellar. ]

Darleen

Tempted, yes, but not foolhardy.

David

Frankly, I was picturing your domestic arrangements as a scene from She.

“You, Tuesday. Attend to my gloriousness.”

WTP

Back in 2006, "Zed" Shaw (a famous Ruby-on-Rails programmer) penned an essay called "Rails is a Ghetto" in which he said that if all you know is programming, you'll be stuck in low-wage trivial coding jobs your whole life. If you know something else and a little bit of programming, you can write your own ticket for the rest of your life because there are tons of fields out there that could desperately benefit from automation and software engineering.

Do you remember Yourdon's Decline And Fall Of The American Programmer, 1992 followed by his Rise & Resurrection of the American Programmer , 1996? Not to mention his Y2K freak out. I was a fan of his methodology, in the context of the time, but rolled my eyes at the "Decline and Fall" thing after a little rumination about it. Thank God I hadn't seen that a few years earlier. By the time 1996 rolled around and there was much competition in the software Guru..."evangelists" even...game I was on my way to mentally checking out on what the "experts" had to say. By the time XML was being hyped, I had essentially decided, even though I was on the elite programming team at my company, that keeping up with "the industry" was a fool's errand. I did my job, did it to best of my ability, but after Dr. Dobbs went web-only I decided if any new tech was all that important, I would hear it from someone else. I still did some advanced stuff. At one of my last efforts I was the one assigned to get their Kafka operation working after a couple guys failed, did some limited Spark/Flink stuff.

That said, "Zed" was himself full of s**t. Unfortunately. I mean, that's probably how things could/should/ought to be but to be a decent programmer it's not so important to understand *specific* things other than programming anymore than it is to understand the latest-and-greatest thing. Though I agree with you on PV=nRT or whatever it was. That's basic high school stuff that people should know*. Far more important is the ability to pick up something you don't know, have no fear of playing around with it, and in many important respects, not being afraid to ask "dumb" questions. And it's this latter bit that can get you into trouble for no good reason. I have on occasion asked a dumb..."dumb" question to try to ferret out if perhaps a fundamental assumption may be wrong. Now there's a jerk way to do this in which you project how f'n smart you are and a proper, yet vulnerable way to do this such that it would be in your best interest to know/understand the personalities of the people on your team first. I found a lot of this got sooooo much easier once my pile of F*** You Money had reached sustainable levels.

I say all this not to bore the non-tech programmers to tears (as I fear we may be doing so) but because the fundamental principles underlying this apply to much more of life in general. Supposedly a liberal, or even "liberal" educations was intended to teach you how to learn by learning many different things. From being around many different people and understanding how much you think you know that you don't know. Somehow we got to a point fundamentally opposite that, where we tolerate the intellectual preening of those who need to be seen rolling their eyes and stating "Obviously...." when someone asks a question, especially one outside the Narrative of whatever domain. And I blame our colleges and universities, especially those with huge 200-300 student lecture classes where questions are only tolerated in "office hours" sessions. Especially those kinds of office hours where the students are lined up out the door.

*"Stuff people should know"...As, thanks to internet and social media and such, I am in somewhat frequent contact with many of the "smart" kids I knew in high school, and quite a few of the "not-smart" ones as well, I am often quite amused at the things the "smart" kids who got better grades than I in certain subjects seem to know less about those subjects all these years later than one would expect. I'm talking the basic stuff, like how electricity generally works, non-political stuff from basic civics classes, etc. not detail stuff about how to do LaPlace Transforms.

Well, that's longer and even more boring than I had hoped as I find I get in trouble beyond two paragraphs...or less...

pst314

Though I agree with you on PV=nRT or whatever it was. That's basic high school stuff that people should know*.

People do tend to forget the basic high school stuff that they don't actually use. But someone has to either know that stuff or know to seek out an expert who does know. At the larger companies I worked for in the 70's/80's, analysts would work with engineers to develop the specifications and design, and then hand that off to a team of programmers.

pst314

Darleen: That Morticia is the perfect comment.

WTP

This is gonna be GR-R-R-R-REAT! Please update your atlases accordingly...

WTP

People do tend to forget the basic high school stuff that they don't actually use. But someone has to either know that stuff or know to seek out an expert who does know. At the larger companies I worked for in the 70's/80's, analysts would work with engineers to develop the specifications and design, and then hand that off to a team of programmers.

Oh, I get that. Guilty as charged as well. The details, yes. But the general ideas? Surely one who took AP history should have some idea/understanding of the Federalist Papers. Not the details as to which specific ones or even a favorite, but that they were there and relevant to the SCOTUS rulings. And yes, in general that is how requirements gathering is done, systems engineers and/or business analysts design the data, data flow, the requirements, etc. I worked on cell phone billing systems for many years. The details of how those things are constructed and/or how the switches work, even in context, I certainly cannot discuss off the top of my head. But the general idea, and especially when being presented by things that make no logical sense, a person should be able to look at/understand these things without having to know the details. The details are what the documentation is for. Though good luck with most of that.

I have written code for billing systems, land line telephone inventory for foreign countries, fingerprint systems, military hardware logistics, rocket launchy thingies, and many other disparate business and military and security systems that in their fundamentals I could not discuss off the top of my head nor did I have any deep, nor sometimes even shallow knowledge about before taking the job. Even the military stuff which I kinda knew on a superficial level as a kid was long gone from detail memory but the general understanding that there are 'splody things and life-support things and landing-things etc. that obey the general laws of physics. But what I can do in all of that, and this is what I was getting at regarding the "other things a programmer should know" is the ways in which there is fundamental logic in how these systems could/would/should work. It's not so much important to know everything, in fact it's bloody impossible, but to understand the philosophical/logical/physical underpinnings of them and how to make them work that is important. Talking about technology or writing a program while people look over your shoulder in an interview, not so much. Talking about how to solve a problem, yes. This gets disparaged, and somewhat rightly so, but I find the way-outside-the-box questions like "how would you stack quarters as tall as the Empire State Building" to be more valid questions than the technical ones. Though more specific "Why are manhole covers round?" to be stupid. AIUI, the latter "correct" accepted answer was itself wrong. Wonder how many companies eliminated people who knew the right answer.

pst314

WTP: Well said. We may have made the non-tech programmers' eyes glaze over, but you make good points which are relevant to many areas of endeavor.

Daniel Ream

That's basic high school stuff that people should know

Ah, but see, it isn't.

The Ideal Gas Law only holds for temperatures and pressures near STP. At extreme temperatures and pressures - like, say, inside a large pressurized industrial gas vessel - the gas molecules are packed close enough to each other that the stereochemistry of the gas molecules starts to matter. Exactly how much you have to modify the Ideal Gas Constant to account for this is a function of the specific gases, their proportion and the pressure and the temperature inside the vessel. Since there's no convenient equation for this, you have to know how to interpolate properly between data points that have been determined by exhaustive experiment.

Which is why "Zed" Shaw was 100% correct. The biggest problem in the software industry is autodidacts mired deep in the Dunning-Kruger effect who think that a superficial knowledge of their problem domain acquired in a weekend constitutes mastery.

pst314

“It’s not enough that we treat media veterans with revulsion and contempt. They also deserve our pity.” (Via Instapundit.)

I'm not so sure about the pity part.

Heiko

wypipo look at books in a "black space" with predictable results

charming, birdhouse-like structures filled with books that invite neighbors and passers-by to take a book, or donate a book, or both

I like passing on the books I've read to friends who I think might enjoy them, and who might have insights that I've missed. But it's specific books to specific friends. I wouldn't leave books out for strangers: it would be presuming that my box of discards is a public amenity, not only for whatever reading material can be recycled from it, but as a catalyst of conviviality.

But the birdhouse image really gets to the appeal of it, how people imagine it's going to work. It's charming, it's twee, it's well intentioned, it sets a good example for the children, it adds to the neighborhood scenery by itself and by the activity it generates, it's an indicator of a good neighborhood if it can stay out without being vandalized, it's Stuff White People Like.

A library is not so much a marker of wealth and whiteness as it is an affirmation of community and cozy, small-town camaraderie that Inglewood, a mostly Black and Latino city in southwestern Los Angeles County, has plenty of.

How many lies, or hopeful claims, are in that sentence?

Birdhouse libraries come out of white camaraderie and white concepts of coziness and community. We know this because it happened. It's as white as a white bread and mayonnaise lunch at the skating outing of a Pat Boone fan club.

Are community, coziness, and camaraderie universal concepts that by universal laws lead to book boxes springing up on the curbside? Surely blacks have different concepts of what's cozy and communal? Block parties with loud music, for example?

She broadcasts the Pat Boone music and pretends to be offended that whites turn up, pretends that Pat Boone is a universal that every culture can adopt as its own.

The response to the library was slow at first — it was the first in the area, and some people mistook it for a birdhouse, or a mailbox. But I was pleased to soon see people stopping by to browse and take home books. Then one morning, glancing out my front window, I saw a young white couple stopped at the library. Instantly, I was flooded with emotions — astonishment, and then resentment, and then astonishment at my resentment.

This would be a great college application essay. The personal initiative taken, the slow but promising takeup, the racial problematization, the "as a Black woman" emotional response, the contextualization of the response within systems of redlining and Black Hair.

I suspect that the initiative didn't quite snowball, if I that metaphor is acceptable, among her black neighbors, that it's still just a box of mostly unwanted books and not a self-sustaining communal chain reaction.

She's looks like she might have a white parent or grandparent, she was married into a Jewish family, she moves in SWPL circles, she has SWPL tastes in birdhouse libraries. I read the article before seeing her picture, and I assumed that she was a with-it white who was living in a black neighborhood and complaining about less with-it whites.

Is she angry because of her own internal conflict between her SWPL tastes and her ancestral black loyalties? Is she angry because her disappointment at the lukewarm takeup among her black neighbors has to be redirected to the SWPL passers by?

WTP

Which is why "Zed" Shaw was 100% correct. The biggest problem in the software industry is autodidacts mired deep in the Dunning-Kruger effect who think that a superficial knowledge of their problem domain acquired in a weekend constitutes mastery.

No. Not really. One can easily go the other way. While I haven't coded directly with math geniuses, I have seen the results of their code and worked with those with decent authority on the subject. The Dunning-Kruger effect goes both ways. The problem isn't the domain space, it is the insecurity of certain didactics to play "gotcha" games. A reasonable person with reasonably good troubleshooting skills can, with proper information, produce the proper code. Granted, not everything can be understood in a short timeframe, but if it were necessary for every single coder to have full knowledge of every single domain that they need to work in, nothing would get done. There simply is not enough time/space/human capacity to do that. The deeper into specifics of a more complicated domain space, the greater the need for subject matter experience. I'm not denying that. But that is a small slice of the greater business domain.

Steve E

but if it were necessary for every single coder to have full knowledge of every single domain that they need to work in, nothing would get done.

Isn't that the role of a good business analyst? I've been programme manager and ultimate business owner of many tech projects and I always got the best results when I gave significant time to both analysts and coders usually together. The investment of my time in the end always saved in development time. I say that as someone with no coding experience. I brought the business expertise and a tight definition of business requirements. I always found that the more the coders knew about what the end users were going to be doing and the limitations they faced in the way they had to do it, the more coders were able to get to a deliverable that worked.

David

What a racist a**hole that somehow thinks her racism is special and unique.

Ah, but hers is a statusful racism, the kind that’s now taught in any number of universities. And so, like so many others, Ms Kaplan chooses to drag around her boutique psychological baggage, which she seems to regard as a kind of social jewellery, a basis for status, while complaining in print about how unhappy she is made by innocuous events, which seems largely a result of her boutique psychological baggage. Which she won’t put down.

pst314

Meanwhile, in Inglewood, California, wypipo look at books in a "black space" with predictable results.

Note this passage from that guest editorial:

"As more Black families moved to the neighborhood, white people moved out in droves. The ground shifted under Uncle Paul’s feet. That white flight forged the chiefly Black and brown South Central of popular imagination and created similar demographics in other city neighborhoods across the country, including Inglewood."

The author neglects mention that South Central became a hell-hole of crime and disorder and every pathology of lower-class dysfunction. Those white people had good reason to move away. Or does the author somehow think that white people were to blame? That, by moving out, they magically transformed honest black citizens into stupid and vicious criminals?

I have known many people who had to move away from neighborhoods they had assumed they would live in all their lives, due to crime and other dysfunctions caused by newly arrived blacks. This put a dent in their retirement savings, made for longer commutes, and disrupted their networks of friends and neighbors.

WTP

I always found that the more the coders knew about what the end users were going to be doing and the limitations they faced in the way they had to do it, the more coders were able to get to a deliverable that worked.

Oh this, definitely. Also I've been on a number of projects where it gets discussed that perhaps a walk-down of a wire center or a trip out to the launch pad or a visit to the POS site would be a good idea and generally speaking, the development staff is hungry for that. But it only goes as far as talk and disappears. Sure anyone can walk into a store for POS experience and buy something, but that's not the same as sitting with a CSR or sales person for 20-30 minutes while they handle multiple customers with multiple issues.

Daniel Ream

if it were necessary for every single coder to have full knowledge of every single domain that they need to work in, nothing would get done.

The vast majority of software serves no useful purpose and has been created by autodidacts seeking a get-rich-quick scheme. The discipline of software engineering is still very much in its infancy despite fifty-some-odd years of knowing full well what works and what doesn't.

At a wild-assed guess, I'd say about 50% of development time is outright wasted due a lack of any kind of engineering discipline requiring expensive rewrites and bugfixing that could and should have been caught before release. That's time that could be spent training the software engineers in their problem domains to ensure that the code does what it's supposed to.

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